Darkroom Diary 8/03/2019: Using The Beseler C-6 Large Format Camera For My Wild Horses Photography

August 02, 2019  •  1 Comment

Darkroom Diary - Using The Beseler C-6 Large Format Press Camera For My Wild Horses Photography Yes, you read the title correctly... I am excited to share that I am using the very rare Beseler C-6 4x5 Press Camera to photograph the Wild Horses of Missouri.

I should say, I am "attempting" to work out the technical details of using a 1950's press camera to help me tell the story of these rare and majestic horses.

This camera was made in 1958 for the United States Air Force and I am digging into the history of this camera and will follow up when I know more.  I do know that it is a rare camera and not very many were made in comparison to other press cameras and very few are available for purchase.  It is the cream of the crop when it comes to handheld 4x5 press cameras.  The all-metal exterior and the simplicity of operation made it a great choice for my Wild Horses project and it also opens the door to 4x5 handheld photography that I have never been able to do before.

Wild Horses of Missouri Pano B&W Print From Beseler C-6 4x5 Press Camera The entire reason I wanted to find a solution that would allow me to create 4x5 large format negatives of the wild horses is to allow me to create large silver gelatin prints in the darkroom using my Heiland LED cold light and split-grade controller. Since I am using film, I always have the option of scanning the negatives and making archival pigment ink prints as well. For my lower-priced prints aimed at meeting the needs of the casual art buyer, I scan the film and make pigment ink prints on Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta Glossy FineArt Paper, and for my collectors, I make handmade silver gelation limited edition gallery prints.

If you are interested in more technical details on the Beseler C-6 camera, Jo Lommen has a really good article on his website that you will appreciate. 

Beseler C-6 4x5 Large Format Camera

My Actual 1958 Beseler C-6 4x5 Press Camera 

Tim Layton Holding "New Life" Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Silver Gelatin PrintTim Layton Holding "New Life" Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Silver Gelatin Print If you love horses, join my Free Wild Horse Journal where I bring you behind the scenes in my darkroom and studio and provide my latest updates and special offers.  Current members are automatically entered for a chance to win one of my wild horse fine art gallery prints every month.  

Join me and other horse lovers from around the world in my Wild Horses of North America Facebook Group.  I share behind the scenes photos and videos in the group that you won't see anywhere else.

I am starting to do Live Video Broadcasts from my new studio and darkroom while I am working and making prints and even doing live art shows too.  I will be making my big 30x40 and 40x50 silver gelatin wild horse prints and also platinum and palladium too.  You can connect with me live on my new YouTube Channel, and in the Darkroom Underground Facebook Group, and the Wild Horses of North America Facebook Group.

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton
My first outing was a success in my opinion because I was able to use the rangefinder to focus on the horses and I used the focal plane shutter. I practiced at home on the dogs and some stationary subjects and I also verified the accuracy of the rangefinder focusing by confirming it on the ground glass.  I wanted to be able to work with total confidence in the field because things change very quickly and there is no time to second guess your equipment or your process.  

This is important for two reasons.  First, the horses are constantly moving, even when I find them grazing, so focusing on the ground glass would never work.  Secondly, the leaf shutter on the lens is limited when compared to the focal plane shutter speeds.  I can use shutter speeds up to 1/1500 I was able to find the Shawnee Creek herd out in the middle of a recently mowed field, so my job was much easier this time.  Last week the grass and weeds were nearly six feet tall at this exact same location.  

By using the focal plane shutter, I can leave my film holder loaded in the camera with the dark slide out and my finger hovering over the shutter release button.  This is a huge benefit over working off the ground glass.  This also means I can use some of my vintage barrel lenses from the late 19th century at some point in the future.  This camera is also setup to work with a 250mm lens, so I plan to see if I can use my Nikkor 240mm lens after I get comfortable with the standard lens.  

Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton The focal plane shutter has two lightproof curtains that are wound onto rollers.  Jo Lommen has a really nice paragraph on the focal plane shutter that I will include here for you.  "The relative positions of the end of the curtains can be varied to provide rectangular openings of different width for the control of shutter speed. The shutter controls located on the right side of the camera body consist of a shutter winding knob (1), a time setting knob (3) with associated shutter speed dial (2), a selector button (6) and a synchro knob(4). Synchronized speeds marked on the indicator dial are: 1/1000 - 1/500 and 1/250. The unsynchronized speeds are T (Time) - B (bulb) 1/30 - 1/50 and 1/125. The shutter is self capping and that means that the shutter can be wound without fogging the film when the dark slide of the film holder has been removed. In other words, both blinds or curtains travel as one unit together along the film surface not allowing light to reach the film surface."

Being able to leave the dark slide out and wind the shutter without fogging the film is an amazing feature that adds a lot of flexibility for me in the field. 

I used Ilford HP5 B&W film rated at my normal EI 250 and developed in D76 1:1 using my N (normal) development time.  Based on the lighting conditions, I used a focal plane shutter speed of 1/125 at F5.6 for this first test image.  I couldn't be any happier with the results.  

Beseler C-6 4x5 Press Camera

Tim Sr. Working With The Beseler C-6 4x5 Press Camera

Photo by Tim Jr. 

Beseler C-6 4x5 Press Camera

My First Negative Was Sharp!

As you can see from the photo of my first negative above and the print below, the horse that I focused on was very sharp and because I elected to use an aperture of F5.6 on the standard 135mm lens, the other horses and the background progressively got softer as I wanted.   

Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Print Made With The Beseler C-6 4x5 Press Camera

Wild Horses of Missouri Pano B&W Print From Beseler C-6 4x5 Press Camera

My First Print From the Beseler C-6 4x5 Press Camera

I did a quick scan of the Ilford HP5 negative on my Epson V750 scanner at 2000 DPI and edited the image in Photoshop.  I played around with some various compositions and ultimately I liked the 1:3 Pano crop which allowed me to make a new print on my Epson P800 printer. 

I made a 22" panoramic print that you see me holding in the photo above, but I had enough pixels to make a 40" print if I wanted to do that.

I used Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta Glossy FineArt Paper for this print and I used the Epson P-800 Advanced B&W mode along with the Sepia toning option. I like the heavy 315 gsm weight of this paper and the feel of the print in my hands.  The 100% cotton paper is critical for the long-term archival performance of the print along with the choice of pigment inks.    

For a first field test, I accomplished everything I had hoped and now I have the confidence to go back in the field this week and wait for the right opportunities and compositions.  I will be able to work with total confidence now and I am really excited to create some negatives that I can print in the darkroom.

I will also be taking my Fuji GX617 panoramic camera out in the field to photograph the wild horses as well, so I will be sharing how all of that works out in a future edition of my Darkroom Diary. I plan to also test some Portra color negative film with the horses before fall colors in a couple of months.

Tim Layton Washing Wild Horse Large Format Silver Gelatin Print

I offer Free Art Consultations to help you figure out the best size and details for any piece of artwork that I create.

You can contact me and share a couple of dates, times, and your best phone number and then I will confirm a date and time for our meeting. I can do Facetime video or Zoom meetings, if you would like to share your space with me as we work through designing your new artwork together.

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

Wild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.comWild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.com Wild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.comWild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.com Wild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.comWild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.com Wild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.comWild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.com Troublemaker - Wild Horse Fine Art by Tim LaytonTroublemaker - Wild Horse Fine Art by Tim Layton Princess Warrior - Wild Horse Fine Art by Tim LaytonPrincess Warrior - Wild Horse Fine Art by Tim Layton

HISTORY OF THE WILD HORSES OF SHANNON COUNTY MISSOURI

8/1/20 - Shawnee Creek Mare - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton8/1/20 - Shawnee Creek Mare - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton Shannon County is home to an extraordinary herd of wild horses that very few people know about. Hidden away in Southeast Missouri in the Ozark National Scenic Riverways on public land about 130 miles from Springfield and 150 miles from St. Louis, 4 herds of wild horses roam the beautiful and rugged landscape. 

Ozark National Scenic Riverways is the first national park area to protect a river system and the only place in the state where wild horses still roam free.

It hasn't been an easy path for the wild horses over the last 100 years and it would be foolish to think current conditions couldn't change and put the horses back in danger again. 

During the 1980s the National Park Service announced a plan to remove the wild horses, and people were outraged. 

In 1993 the U.S. Supreme Court denied a final appeal to protect the horses and gave the National Park Service the right to remove the horses from federal land at their discretion.  

The national park service started the process of removing the wild horses in a way that was profoundly upsetting to local residents and horse lovers around the country.  The people of Shannon County and horse lovers around the country rallied together and the Wild Horse League of Missouri was formed.

Wild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim Layton Luckily, by 1996 the Wild Horse League of Missouri, which formed in 1992 to save the wild horses, received help from the people of Shannon County, Congressman Bill Emerson, and Senators Kit Bond and John Ashcroft.

Their tireless efforts paid off, and President Clinton signed a bill into law on October 3, 1996, to make the wild horses of Shannon County a permanent part of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways.  

Now, people from around the world visit Shannon County Missouri in hopes of seeing these majestic wild horses.

The Missouri Wild Horse League works with the National Park Service to capture some of the horses when the herd exceeds the maximum agreed upon limit of 50 horses.  The captured horses are taken into care and evaluated before being adopted by loving families for permanent homes.

It is important to remember that these horses are wild. When looking for them, be sure not to approach them or attempt to feed them. It is essential to keep these animals wild and free, and for you to be safe. The horses are big, strong, and unpredictable and for your own safety as well as theirs, keep a safe distance of 100 yards or more between you and the horses. 

 

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton


Comments

Robin Jamesom(non-registered)
We also have Eson P-800. Very good printer.
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