The Technical Details On My New B&W Wild Horses Fine Art Prints

July 13, 2019  •  Leave a Comment

Technical Details on my Wild Horse B&W Fine Art Prints I've been working hard on my new Wild Horses of Missouri portfolio and I am excited to share some of my latest prints with you some of the technical details with you in this article. 

The exact origin of the wild horses of Shannon County, Missouri is unknown, but many believe the herds formed during the great depression when locals abandoned their homes and farms and left their horses and livestock behind.  The horses were thought to have gone feral and found a way to survive.  The landscape of the Missouri Ozark's is ancient, dating back at least to over 1.5 billion years ago when a major volcanic event happened which formed the St. Francois Mountains and left behind remnants that we still marvel at today. 

Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Fine Art Print by Tim Layton The story of the wild horses totally captured my attention in 2014 when I was looking to purchase some land to build my new cabin and darkroom off the grid. Once I investigated where to find them and finally made it to the field to see them in person, it was all over for me... I knew at some point in the future, I had to tell the story of these majestic animals and do whatever I could to raise awareness about them. 

They are protected by law now, but this hasn't always been the case.  They were actively hunted and some eliminated and others were removed without any details on their new location before the people of Shannon County got the attention of fellow horse lovers and some key politicians that ultimately helped sponsor a the new law to protect them.  You can read more about the wild horses.

Tim Layton Holding "New Life" Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Silver Gelatin PrintTim Layton Holding "New Life" Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Silver Gelatin Print If you love horses, join my Free Wild Horse Journal where I bring you behind the scenes in my darkroom and studio and provide my latest updates and special offers.  Current members are automatically entered for a chance to win one of my wild horse fine art gallery prints every month.  

Join me and other horse lovers from around the world in my Wild Horses of North America Facebook Group.  I share behind the scenes photos and videos in the group that you won't see anywhere else.

I am starting to do Live Video Broadcasts from my new studio and darkroom while I am working and making prints and even doing live art shows too.  I will be making my big 30x40 and 40x50 silver gelatin wild horse prints and also platinum and palladium too.  You can connect with me live on my new YouTube Channel, and in the Darkroom Underground Facebook Group, and the Wild Horses of North America Facebook Group.

WILD HORSE B&W PRINT TECHNICAL DETAILS

Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton I use black and white film to photograph the wild horses because it allows me to communicate the emotion that I have for these majestic wild horses in a way that just isn't possible if I used modern digital gear. 

My process is simple, pure, and full of joy and emotion, just like the wild horses.

My giclée prints are made with black and white film using pH neutral cotton rag paper and archival pigment inks for an archival rating that is likely to exceed 400 years. 

The choice of paper is critical to the overall aesthetics of the artwork, but also for its archival permanence and this is why I use Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta. 

Consumer grade papers are typically made using alpha-cellulose (wood pulp). But over time, the pH changes and the resulting acidity causes the paper fibers to turn yellow and eventually break down. The print becomes so fragile, it can no longer be handled without falling apart. 

The best quality papers are made from pH neutral cotton fibers, referred to as "rag" or "cotton rag" and this is why we have standardized on using Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta paper.

Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton The Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta paper has a 100% cotton base with a very finely textured gloss surface finish that is very similar to our silver gelatin fine art gallery prints.  This paper also contains barium sulfate to further enhance the density, color gamut, color gradation, and sharpness while maintaining the feel and quality of a traditional darkroom paper.  The paper is also archival with no optical brightening agents (OBA) along with being acid-free and calcium carbonate buffered. Hahnemühle has been making beautiful papers since the 15th century, and we are proud to create our most exceptional artwork on their paper. 

By using archival-based pigment based inks with the Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta paper, I can produce extremely high quality and archival artwork that can last for hundreds of years.  

According to comprehensive tests conducted by Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc. (WIR), the world's leading independent permanence testing laboratory, our Designer Series fine art prints have permanence ratings that likely exceed 400 years.  This is all possible because of our choice of Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta paper and the Epson UltraChrome HD pigment inks that we use to make the prints.

Tim Layton Washing Wild Horse Large Format Silver Gelatin Print

I offer Free Art Consultations to help you figure out the best size and details for any piece of artwork that I create.

You can contact me and share a couple of dates, times, and your best phone number and then I will confirm a date and time for our meeting. I can do Facetime video or Zoom meetings, if you would like to share your space with me as we work through designing your new artwork together.

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

Wild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.comWild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.com Wild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.comWild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.com Wild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.comWild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.com Wild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.comWild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.com Troublemaker - Wild Horse Fine Art by Tim LaytonTroublemaker - Wild Horse Fine Art by Tim Layton Princess Warrior - Wild Horse Fine Art by Tim LaytonPrincess Warrior - Wild Horse Fine Art by Tim Layton

HISTORY OF THE WILD HORSES OF SHANNON COUNTY MISSOURI

8/1/20 - Shawnee Creek Mare - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton8/1/20 - Shawnee Creek Mare - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton Shannon County is home to an extraordinary herd of wild horses that very few people know about. Hidden away in Southeast Missouri in the Ozark National Scenic Riverways on public land about 130 miles from Springfield and 150 miles from St. Louis, 4 herds of wild horses roam the beautiful and rugged landscape. 

Ozark National Scenic Riverways is the first national park area to protect a river system and the only place in the state where wild horses still roam free.

It hasn't been an easy path for the wild horses over the last 100 years and it would be foolish to think current conditions couldn't change and put the horses back in danger again. 

During the 1980s the National Park Service announced a plan to remove the wild horses, and people were outraged. 

In 1993 the U.S. Supreme Court denied a final appeal to protect the horses and gave the National Park Service the right to remove the horses from federal land at their discretion.  

The national park service started the process of removing the wild horses in a way that was profoundly upsetting to local residents and horse lovers around the country.  The people of Shannon County and horse lovers around the country rallied together and the Wild Horse League of Missouri was formed.

Wild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim Layton Luckily, by 1996 the Wild Horse League of Missouri, which formed in 1992 to save the wild horses, received help from the people of Shannon County, Congressman Bill Emerson, and Senators Kit Bond and John Ashcroft.

Their tireless efforts paid off, and President Clinton signed a bill into law on October 3, 1996, to make the wild horses of Shannon County a permanent part of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways.  

Now, people from around the world visit Shannon County Missouri in hopes of seeing these majestic wild horses.

The Missouri Wild Horse League works with the National Park Service to capture some of the horses when the herd exceeds the maximum agreed upon limit of 50 horses.  The captured horses are taken into care and evaluated before being adopted by loving families for permanent homes.

It is important to remember that these horses are wild. When looking for them, be sure not to approach them or attempt to feed them. It is essential to keep these animals wild and free, and for you to be safe. The horses are big, strong, and unpredictable and for your own safety as well as theirs, keep a safe distance of 100 yards or more between you and the horses. 

 

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

 


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