Darkroom Diary 7/13/2019: B&W Wild Horses Print Comparison Using Kodak P3200 and Tri-X in D76

July 12, 2019  •  1 Comment

Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton I decided to try the new emulsion Kodak T-Max P3200 film this week while photographing the Wild Horses of Missouri. 

I regularly work in early morning low light scenarios and sometimes I need the ability to rate my films at EI 1600 and EI 3200.  

In case you are not aware, P3200 is not an ISO 3200 film, it is technically an ISO 800 film that Kodak claims can be pushed to EI 3200 as opposed to Tri-X that is an ISO 400 film that is suggested not be pushed beyond two stops to EI 1600.  The P in P3200 stands for "Push". You can download a PDF about P3200 directly from Kodak to review the technical details and development suggestions.

I decided to try some of the new emulsion T-Max P3200 because I wanted to know how it would render the grain, sharpness, and tonal values for my style of wildlife photography at EI 3200 or even EI 6400 as compared to Tri-X at EI 1600 in D76 1:1. 

Tim Layton Holding "New Life" Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Silver Gelatin PrintTim Layton Holding "New Life" Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Silver Gelatin Print If you love horses, join my Free Wild Horse Journal where I bring you behind the scenes in my darkroom and studio and provide my latest updates and special offers.  Current members are automatically entered for a chance to win one of my wild horse fine art gallery prints every month.  

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In this video, I share some of my new wild horse prints with you and discuss my findings and thoughts about Kodak P3200 and Tri-X.  

7-13-19 Darkroom Diary - B&W Wild Horses Print Comparison Using Kodak P3200 and Tri-X

FILM DEVELOPMENT BACKGROUND INFO

Shawnee 07/2019Shawnee 07/2019 I decided to develop my roll of T-Max P3200 in D-76 because this is the de facto black and white film developer.  Kodak recommends using D-76 stock and developing the film when rated at EI 3200 for 14 minutes when using a rotary processor.  Since I have not tested this film, I decided to use Kodak's recommendation to see how this would render my shadow values (based on exposure) and highlight values (based on development time).

I had high hopes for P3200, but it didn't meet my creative intentions as I discussed in the video.  It was flat and I didn't care for the grain pattern.  The prints felt lifeless to me. 

I used Tri-X for most of my wildlife photography because I like the higher contrast of Tri-X over HP5 and when developing Tri-X in D-76, it is a very forgiving combination.

Why even bother with P3200?  There are times when I need EI 3200 when photographing the wild horses and elk at first light in the morning and in the late evenings.  I thought since I loved Tri-X at EI 1600 that I would also love P3200 at EI 3200.  I was wrong...

From an exposure and film development perspective, my shadows were reasonably good and the highlight values were not blown out or underdeveloped.  This indicated to me the exposure and development choices were reasonable.  

So, what's the problem then?

I simply did not like the "look" of my wild horse images with the T-Max P3200 and D-76 combination when comparing the images to my Tri-X at EI 1600 in D-76 1:1 or my Delta 3200 in Microphen.  

I assumed the amount of grain would be similar to Delta 3200 and the sharpness would be better because of the T-Grain technology in T-Max films.  I was wrong on both accounts.  

CAMERA GEAR USED

My core gear for photographing the wild horses includes the Nikon F6 camera with the 600 F4 or 300 F2.8 lenses.  Tim Jr usually shoots the F5 or the F100 with whatever lens I am not using.  Having two of us with two different focal lengths has opened up more opportunities than either of us had originally thought possible.  I normally rate Tri-X between EI 400 and EI 1600 and develop in D-76 1:1 for the majority of my wildlife images.  I like the higher contrast of Tri-X versus the lower contrast HP5 film.  If I want a lower contrast scene, then I reach for Ilford HP5 and I also develop that in D-76 1:1.  

ILFORD DELTA 3200 COMPARISON

I didn't include my Delta 3200 prints in the video, but I thought I would add some of my thoughts here in the article.

I photographed some wild elk at sunrise with Delta 3200 developed in Microphen and LOVED the tonal pallet, grain, and overall feeling and mood of the images.

I thought since P3200 was part of the T-Max family the film would be very sharp and most likely have less grain than Delta 3200. As indicated above, I was wrong in both cases.    

I reserve my final opinion about film and paper choices until I am holding the print in my hand.  I felt like the grain and tonal range of the Delta 3200 was exactly what I was looking for.  I liked the mood of the prints and I was really surprised by the level of detail.  

Based on my elk photos, I know that I can use Delta 3200 at EI 3200 and develop in Microphen and produce the type of prints that meet my creative vision.  This is good news, however, it also means that I would have to keep Delta 3200 and Microphen on hand and if I can avoid that, I would prefer that.  

KODAK TRI-X AT EI 1600 COMPARISON

Kodak Tri-X rated anywhere between EI 250 and EI 1600 is my standard film for my wildlife photography.  I develop this film in D-76 1:1 based on my detailed film and developer testing process.  

Below are some of my latest images and all were shot at sunrise in very low light at EI 1600 and developed using my standard process with D-76 1:1 in my Jobo CPP-3 processor.

The images below are scans of the negatives and edited in Photoshop.  I scanned the films with the Nikon ES-2 Film Digitizer and the Epson V-850 Pro scanner.  I made some prints from these scans with my Epson P800 in the advanced B&W mode on Hahnemühle Fine Art Baryta paper. Those prints look very similar to the digital images below and I am very happy with them.  I haven't had time to make some split-grade silver gelatin prints of these images yet, but I plan to do that soon. 

Wild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim Layton

Early Morning Centuries

Wild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim Layton

Get Back & Give Me Some Space

Wild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim Layton

New Foal With Mom at Sunrise

WHERE TO GO FROM HERE?

I have been trying to simplify every area of my life over the last several years, so using one film and one developer for the majority of my wildlife photography has been a good fit for this mindset and I haven't given up anything creatively. 

Based on some missed opportunities and field conditions, I am struggling with finding an EI 3200 and even an occasional EI 6400 film and developer combination that works for my style.  I don't want my EI 3200 images looking drastically different that the rest of my body of work if that can be avoided.  

My plan is to expose some Tri-X at EI 3200 this coming week and do a 

I have been told by several readers that they like T-Max P3200 in T-Max developer, so that is an option that I may consider as well. 

In an email with David Bivins, David shared some of his work with Delta 3200 at EI 3200 and Tri-X pushed to EI 3200 developed in Rodinal.  David has inspired me to try some Tri-X at EI 3200 and develop in Rodinal.  David developed in a daylight tank for 11 minutes with a 30 second initial agitation, then a gentle tip every minute.  I plan to try a stand and semi-stand development with Rodinal in an attempt to tame the grain a little more and then evaluate the new prints to see how I feel about them.

It would be so much easier and less expensive if the Tri-X at EI 3200 performs, but the only way to know for sure is to invest the time and make the prints.

For the pigment ink prints, I've been printing on Hahnemühle's gloss, satin, and new metallic papers and I have really been impressed with the quality, tonal rendering, and overall aesthetics.

Tim Layton Washing Wild Horse Large Format Silver Gelatin Print

I offer Free Art Consultations to help you figure out the best size and details for any piece of artwork that I create.

You can contact me and share a couple of dates, times, and your best phone number and then I will confirm a date and time for our meeting. I can do Facetime video or Zoom meetings, if you would like to share your space with me as we work through designing your new artwork together.

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

Wild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.comWild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.com Wild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.comWild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.com Wild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.comWild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.com Wild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.comWild Horses of Missouri Fine Art Prints by Tim Layton www.timlaytonwildhorses.com Troublemaker - Wild Horse Fine Art by Tim LaytonTroublemaker - Wild Horse Fine Art by Tim Layton Princess Warrior - Wild Horse Fine Art by Tim LaytonPrincess Warrior - Wild Horse Fine Art by Tim Layton

HISTORY OF THE WILD HORSES OF SHANNON COUNTY MISSOURI

8/1/20 - Shawnee Creek Mare - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton8/1/20 - Shawnee Creek Mare - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton Shannon County is home to an extraordinary herd of wild horses that very few people know about. Hidden away in Southeast Missouri in the Ozark National Scenic Riverways on public land about 130 miles from Springfield and 150 miles from St. Louis, 4 herds of wild horses roam the beautiful and rugged landscape. 

Ozark National Scenic Riverways is the first national park area to protect a river system and the only place in the state where wild horses still roam free.

It hasn't been an easy path for the wild horses over the last 100 years and it would be foolish to think current conditions couldn't change and put the horses back in danger again. 

During the 1980s the National Park Service announced a plan to remove the wild horses, and people were outraged. 

In 1993 the U.S. Supreme Court denied a final appeal to protect the horses and gave the National Park Service the right to remove the horses from federal land at their discretion.  

The national park service started the process of removing the wild horses in a way that was profoundly upsetting to local residents and horse lovers around the country.  The people of Shannon County and horse lovers around the country rallied together and the Wild Horse League of Missouri was formed.

Wild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim Layton Luckily, by 1996 the Wild Horse League of Missouri, which formed in 1992 to save the wild horses, received help from the people of Shannon County, Congressman Bill Emerson, and Senators Kit Bond and John Ashcroft.

Their tireless efforts paid off, and President Clinton signed a bill into law on October 3, 1996, to make the wild horses of Shannon County a permanent part of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways.  

Now, people from around the world visit Shannon County Missouri in hopes of seeing these majestic wild horses.

The Missouri Wild Horse League works with the National Park Service to capture some of the horses when the herd exceeds the maximum agreed upon limit of 50 horses.  The captured horses are taken into care and evaluated before being adopted by loving families for permanent homes.

It is important to remember that these horses are wild. When looking for them, be sure not to approach them or attempt to feed them. It is essential to keep these animals wild and free, and for you to be safe. The horses are big, strong, and unpredictable and for your own safety as well as theirs, keep a safe distance of 100 yards or more between you and the horses. 

 

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton


Comments

Wang(non-registered)
I've known that Spur Speed Major may be a great developer for P3200 at EI 3200. Would you consider to try it?
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