Tim Layton Fine Art: Blog https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog en-us (C) Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved (Tim Layton Fine Art) Sat, 01 May 2021 13:50:00 GMT Sat, 01 May 2021 13:50:00 GMT https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/img/s/v-12/u131224912-o510457233-50.jpg Tim Layton Fine Art: Blog https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog 80 120 New Darkroom - Big Wild Horse Prints - Exploring Options https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/new-darkroom-big-wild-horse-prints-exploring-options New Darkroom Diagram by Tim LaytonNew Darkroom Diagram by Tim Layton I am in the process of designing and building out my new darkroom for making 30"x40", 40"x60", and 48"x60" silver gelatin wild horse prints for my art buyers and collectors.  I am designing everything around the larger 48x60 size.  In other words, all my trays, print washer, etc in my workflow is built around the larger 48x60 dimension. 

The basic dimensions of the new darkroom are about 30 ft. x 30 ft as shown in the first draft illustration to the left of this text. 

I plan on spending a lot of time in the darkroom before I commit to a final build plan.  I am using blue painters tape to lay things out on the floors and walls to help give me a sense of the size.  

You will notice in the center of the diagram I have my large DEV/STOP/FIX 1 trays.  This is actually a 4 ft x 12 ft table where these three trays sit on top and the other three for FIX2, WASH, and HCLR sit on a shelf below until I need them.  I am designing a flip out top on one side to allow all six trays to available for use during a production run.  A few years ago I attempted to use a very large PVC tube for making my big prints in an effort to save the floor space, but that never worked out for me above 30x40.   

I also have a large utility cart that I sit one of the trays on and I can wheel it around as needed for when I am doing things like selenium toning.  The floors are finished concrete, so it makes moving things around very easy and also very sturdy and stable. 

8x10 large format negative by Tim Layton8x10 large format negative by Tim Layton At the heart of the process is my Beseler 45V-XL 8x10 enlarger with the Heiland cold light head and split-grade controller.  You can see in this photo where Tim Jr and I custom built a vertical mount solution and had the 48x60 easel on the floor.  Now that I have more than twice the space as before, I hope to either elevate the easel off the floor because that kills my knees and back, or possibly explore a horizontal solution this time.  I won't know until I start the process and trying things. 

My first order of business is to get my floor to ceiling 24" deep shelving build on the right side of the darkroom for a massive amount of storage.  It only takes up 2 feet of floor space and I will end up with over 120 feet of linear storage.  I can't wait!! 

Then, I plan to start in on all of the 1x12 shelving around the interior walls that will hold all of my "stuff".  With this much space, I will be able to get really organized and optimized for each of my silver and platinum workflows.   

Over the last few years I have been capturing a lot of the wild horse images on my Nikon F6 35mm SLR and 600mm F4 lens and then making smaller silver gelatin enlargements as well as making enlarged 8x10 analog negatives for making my bigger 30x40 and 40x50 silver gelatin prints.

I even have my Linhof Master Technika configured with three different lenses that are properly cammed to the rangefinder so I can do some select handheld 4x5 exposures of the wild horses too.  I am using HP5 rated at either EI 400 or EI 800 to help keep the shutter speeds up at a level where I can get sharp handheld images.  That is an incredible amount of fun!!

You are welcome to connect with me on my personal Facebook account where I share behind the scenes updates with my friends and family that I don't share anywhere else.

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Over the last several months, I have been capturing thousands of wild horse images using my Nikon D5 and the same 600mm F4 lens.  I have typically used the D5 for 4K video and some select wildlife photography.  

Tim Layton Holding "New Life" Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Silver Gelatin PrintTim Layton Holding "New Life" Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Silver Gelatin Print I have figured out a way to create an FP4 analog negative from my D5 digital captures and I have made some test prints from these new negatives.  This is a proprietary process that Tim Jr and I created.  

I am exploring the idea of getting an Epson SureColor P9570 printer to make the 40x60 archival pigment ink wild horse prints. 

I haven't ordered it yet because I need to get the space ready for it in the new darkroom first and I want to buy a couple test prints that are made with this specific printer.  I need to hold some prints in my hand and hang them on the wall and view them for a while to make sure they meet my expectations.  

The D5 files being upsized to make 40x60 prints is arguably challenging for even the best Photoshop wizard, however, Adobe just released a new "Super Resolution" feature in Adobe Camera RAW 13.2 that effectively doubles the resolution of your image along with some Adobe magic sauce. I have tested this on about 10 or so wild horse images and so far, I am really liking what I see. 

Here is what Adobe has to say about this new feature: "Enhance provides a set of features such as Raw Details and Super Resolution to help improve image quality using Camera Raw. 

Raw Details, previously called Enhance Details produces crisp detail and more accurate renditions of edges, improves color rendering, and also reduces artifacts. The resolution of the enhanced image stays the same as the original image. This feature is especially useful for large displays and prints, where fine details are visible.

Super Resolution, introduced in Camera Raw 13.2, helps create an enhanced image with similar results as Raw Details but with 2x the linear resolution. This means that the enhanced image will have 2x the width and 2x the height of the original image, or 4x the total pixel count. This feature supports the same file types as Raw Details, plus additional file types such as JPEG and TIFF. Super Resolution is especially useful to increase the resolution of a cropped image."

All of this could mean that my awesome D5 with its incredible low-light and AF performance could produce images that are comparable to the D-850 which is twice the resolution.  Some initial basic testing has me very hopeful, but I need more experience and time to see if it will really hold up.  If it doesn't, then I could just use a D-850 with the additional grip and that will produce more than enough pixels for the 40x60 pigment ink prints.  There is also the Gigapixel AI option for file enlargements as well.  Until I see the prints in person, all of this is just theory and a hopeful dream.  

I am super excited to look at my big 40x60 and 48x60 silver gelatin prints next to the Epson archival pigment ink prints and see what I think.  I am not in the mindset of trying to do a direct comparison, but looking at the pigment ink prints to make sure I think they are what I want to share with my art buyers and collectors. 

My priority and heart will always be with the silver gelatin wild horse prints.  The pigment ink prints could be a more cost friendly option for new or first time art buyers making it possible to get more wild horse prints hung on the wall for even more people.  

Based on previous experience, I will be trying Canson Platine Fiber Rag paper as my first paper if I move forward with the P9570 printer.  I think this paper is about as close as you can get to silver gelatin fiber baryta paper, but only time and experience can confirm this for me. I have made some 16x20 prints on my P800 and this is the basis for my current theory. 

I also want to compare one or two Hahnemühle Photo Rag papers because I absolutely love Hahnemühle papers and their quality is something that I have relied on with my platinum prints for many years.  

I will share new articles, photos, and updates as I work on the new darkroom and the wild horse prints. 

-Tim Layton

Tim Layton Washing Wild Horse Large Format Silver Gelatin Print

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Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white darkroom fine art wild horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/new-darkroom-big-wild-horse-prints-exploring-options Fri, 30 Apr 2021 22:39:54 GMT
Everything Has Changed https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/everything-has-changed Everything Has Changed by Tim LaytonEverything Has Changed by Tim Layton In case you didn't already know, I lost my youngest daughter Abigail in a car accident recently.  Her sudden and crushing loss has changed everything that I previous thought and knew.  

Prior to this tragic accident and loss with Abby, I was on a path to retirement from Tim Layton Fine Art and pursing some personal passion projects.  I didn't get too far into this chapter when this accident turned my world upside down. 

As I grieve and work through the loss of my daughter, I have realized that I am at my best helping others. 

Over the years I have made a lot of friends with analog photographers around the world and I always closed out the week feeling good about what I had accomplished and the people that I helped.  

I have received a lot of emails and notes from many of you in regards to losing Abby, and I want to say thank you again for your friendship, support, and encouragement.  I deeply appreciate it more than you probably know. 

You are welcome to connect with me on my personal Facebook account where I share behind the scenes updates with my friends and family that I don't share anywhere else.

As I move forward, I plan to be actively writing new helping articles, tutorials, and possibly even some new training workshops and guidebooks.  I want and need to stay busy and sharing my knowledge and experience with fellow photographers is a form of therapy for me.  By helping you, I am helping myself heal.

I purchased a new home a couple of months ago and I am in the process of buying a new small building and converting it into my new darkroom.  As I work through that process, I will share my design choices and everything about the build process in hopes that it may give you some ideas.

-Tim Layton

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Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

Buy Your Photography, Video, & Technology Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

B&H Photo VideoB&H Photo Video COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white black and white photography darkroom darkroom digest fine art large format photography silver gelatin https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/everything-has-changed Thu, 29 Apr 2021 14:45:00 GMT
Wild Horse Field Diary - Sunday April 25, 2021 - Wild Horses of Missouri Broadfoot Herd https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/wild-horse-field-diary---sunday-april-25-2021 Tim Layton - Wild Horses of MissouriTim Layton - Wild Horses of Missouri It was a magical morning with the Wild Horses of Missouri Broadfoot herd today. 

I got out to the Broadfoot area before sunrise and the valley was completely covered in a blanket of fog.  

I patiently waited for the light and suddenly the herd appeared.  I could barely make them out because the fog was so heavy, but I could hear and smell them from the woods where I was located.  

I got to see the three new foals today and that is always a joy.  There are a total of 15 in the Broadfoot herd as of today, counting the three new foals.  

You are welcome to connect with me on my personal Facebook account where I share behind the scenes updates with my friends and family that I don't share anywhere else.

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The real magic today was I got to watch the stallion court one of his mares at sunrise and I got several great photos as well some some incredible 4K video footage of the event too.  You will see a few of those photos in the section below. 

I will share additional photos from today and the 4K video in the near future after I get the editing completed. 

For the photos today, I used my Nikon D5 with the Nikon 600mm F4 lens and for the video I used the Canon C200 with a 150mm-600mm zoom lens. 

Broadfoot Herd - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton 04-25-21Broadfoot Herd - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton 04-25-21 Broadfoot Herd - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton 04-25-21Broadfoot Herd - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton 04-25-21 Broadfoot Herd - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton 04-25-21Broadfoot Herd - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton 04-25-21 Broadfoot Herd - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton 04-25-21Broadfoot Herd - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton 04-25-21 Broadfoot Herd - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton 04-25-21Broadfoot Herd - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton 04-25-21
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HISTORY OF THE WILD HORSES OF MISSOURI

8/1/20 - Shawnee Creek Mare and New Foal - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton8/1/20 - Shawnee Creek Mare and New Foal - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton Shannon County is home to an extraordinary herd of wild horses. Located in Southeast Missouri in the Ozark National Scenic Riverways on public land about 130 miles from Springfield and 150 miles from St. Louis.

Ozark National Scenic Riverways is the first national park area to protect a river system and the only place in the state where wild horses still roam free. It hasn't been an easy path for the wild horses over the last 100 years and it would be foolish to think current conditions couldn't change and put the horses back in danger again. 

During the 1980s the National Park Service announced a plan to remove the wild horses, and people were outraged. 

In 1993 the U.S. Supreme Court denied a final appeal to protect the horses and gave the National Park Service the right to remove the horses from federal land at their discretion.  

The national park service started the process of removing the wild horses in a way that was profoundly upsetting to local residents and horse lovers around the country.  The people of Shannon County and horse lovers around the country rallied together and the Wild Horse League of Missouri was formed.

Wild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County Missouri by Tim Layton Luckily, by 1996 the Wild Horse League of Missouri, which formed in 1992 to save the wild horses, received help from the people of Shannon County, Congressman Bill Emerson, and Senators Kit Bond and John Ashcroft.

Their tireless efforts paid off, and President Clinton signed a bill into law on October 3, 1996, to make the wild horses of Shannon County a permanent part of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways.  

Now, people from around the world visit Shannon County in hopes of seeing these majestic wild horses.

The Missouri Wild Horse League works with the National Park Service to capture some of the horses when the herd exceeds 50.  The captured horses are taken into care and evaluated before being adopted by loving families for permanent homes.

It is important to remember that these horses are wild. When looking for them, be sure not to approach them or attempt to feed them. It is essential to keep these animals wild and free, and for you to be safe. The horses are big, strong, and unpredictable and for your own safety as well as theirs, keep a safe distance of 100 yards or more between you and the horses. 

 

Free Wild Horse Fine Art Journal by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Fine Art Journal by Tim Layton

 

The Wild Horses of Missouri are generally organized into 4 herds and 5 bands to include: Shawnee Creek, Broadfoot, Round Spring, and Rocky Creek. You can click on each of the herd names and review the latest information about each herd.  If you would like to get more information on where to find the Wild Horses of Missouri, review my detailed online guide for the latest information.

Wild Horses of Missouri Broadfoot Herd by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri Broadfoot Herd by Tim Layton Wild Horses of Missouri Rocky Creek Herd by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri Rocky Creek Herd by Tim Layton

Wild Horses of Missouri Round Spring Herd by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri Round Spring Herd by Tim Layton Wild Horses of Missouri Shawnee Creek Herd by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri Shawnee Creek Herd by Tim Layton

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Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

Buy Your Photography, Video, & Technology Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

B&H Photo VideoB&H Photo Video COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) Broadfoot Missouri Shanon County Wild Horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/wild-horse-field-diary---sunday-april-25-2021 Sun, 25 Apr 2021 22:16:12 GMT
Adox Lupex Silver Chloride Contact Printing Paper + Digital Negatives Part I https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/adox-lupex-silver-chloride-contact-printing-paper-digital-negatives-part-i Adox Lupex Silver Chloride Contact Paper + Digital Negatives Part I by Tim LaytonAdox Lupex Silver Chloride Contact Paper + Digital Negatives Part I by Tim Layton I am working on something exciting, so I thought I would share this with you from the very beginning.  

Last year I made several large format silver chloride contact prints of wild horses from some 8x10 enlarged negatives that I created via my pure analog process. 

Basically, I use my Nikon F6 with either Tri-X or HP-5 in the field using my 600mm F4 lens to create the exposures and then using the classic analog process to make an interpositive before ultimately making the enlarged analog negative.  I mostly make 8x10 enlarged negatives from the original 35mm film for both contact prints or my big silver gelatin enlargements.  

You are welcome to connect with me on my personal Facebook account where I share behind the scenes updates with my friends and family that I don't share anywhere else.

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Wild Horse Silver Gelatin Fine Art Print by Tim LaytonWild Horse Silver Gelatin Fine Art Print by Tim Layton This year, I am going to take everything that I know about creating custom curves in Photoshop and digital negatives for making platinum and palladium prints and using that to create a new curve and digital negatives for making silver chloride contact prints. 

I have waited for almost 7 months for the Adox Lupex silver chloride paper to come back in stock and I was finally able to order some 16x20 paper yesterday! 

I also have several large format negatives that have either some small imperfections or something making them undesirable to use for making contact prints.  If this project goes well, I will scan these large format negatives, make the necessary repairs/edits in Photoshop and make a new digital negative.  This could possibly open up a lot of new printing opportunities.  

I am going to start with making some smaller 8x10 prints first while I explore a variety of developers ranging from Amidol to others and then dial in the look and feeling of the prints before going larger.  The plan is to start making some 16x20 silver chloride contact prints and dry mounting them on 20x24 for final presentation. 

As I work my way through the technical details and creative choices, I will create additional articles sharing my thoughts, findings, and analysis.  

8x10 large format negative by Tim Layton8x10 large format negative by Tim Layton I have always loved silver chloride contact prints in Amidol and I hope that I make some nice discoveries in this new adventure.  

I should mention that my wild horses project is the driving force behind me exploring these new options.  The vast majority of my work with the horses is captured on my F6 35mm SLR using my 600mm F4 lens because I need the mobility and focal reach.  

I plan to first create some digital negatives from my 35mm film scans and see how that goes.  I do a lot of video of the horses in the field with my D5 or D6, and I also have a fair amount of digital captures that I can use for testing too.  If this all works as good as I hope, I could potentially start capturing using the D5 or D6, making the digital negatives, and then make the silver chloride contact prints.  

I will keep you posted as I make progress or hit the wall with issues.

Stay tuned!
 

Analog Photography Learning Library by Tim LaytonAnalog Photography Learning Library by Tim Layton

ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY TRAINING LIBRARY

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

Buy Your Photography, Video, & Technology Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

B&H Photo VideoB&H Photo Video COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) Adox Adox Lupex analog photography black and white darkroom fine art Silver Chloride Wild Horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/adox-lupex-silver-chloride-contact-printing-paper-digital-negatives-part-i Sat, 24 Apr 2021 18:35:38 GMT
How To Mix D-76 B&W Film Developer at Home & Save a Lot of Money https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/how-to-mix-d-76-b-w-film-developer-at-home-save-a-lot-of-money How To Mix D-76 B&W Film Developer at Home & Save MoneyHow To Mix D-76 B&W Film Developer at Home & Save Money If you develop your own black and white film at home, then you already know that you probably go through periods where you develop a lot of film and then nothing for a while.  Many people end up wasting a lot of developer because they have to discard it.  Not only is this costly, it isn't so great for the environment either. 

In this article today, I share the D-76H formula which is a version of the original D-76 formula minus the undesirable Hydroquinone agent.  This version of the formula performs exactly the same as the original formula and it is much more friendly to our environment too.  

There is good reason why D76 is the developer that all other developers are measured against and you will find D-76 on every film manufacturers recommended developers data sheet. 

You are welcome to connect with me on my personal Facebook account where I provide behind the scenes updates for my friends and family that I don't share anywhere else.

Free Analog Photography Resource Guides by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Resource Guides by Tim Layton

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Being able to mix your black and white film developer on demand has a lot of obvious advantages ranging from a significant cost savings to being less wasteful and more eco-friendly to our environment.

If you are looking for the ultimate results in your black and white work, then you should consider mixing your own developer as I outline in this article and properly testing each of your films.  I have a visual-based step-by-step video workshop that walks you through the entire film testing process from beginning to end. 

In the article below, I include everything you need to know to start mixing your own black and white film developer today. 

The formula that I share with you today omits hydroquinone and increases metol by 0.5g. This formula is reported to prevent the increased contrast associated with the original D-76 formula during storage, but it does not prolong the shelf life. However, the most important point is that the use of this developer does not discharge hydroquinone to wastewater.  I tested aged D-76 on a couple of different occasions and could never measure the increased pH that is reported to occur.  Even if that is the case, this formula is better for the environment. 

Hydroquinone is a carcinogen.  The chemical has been identified as both a potential clastogen and mutagen. A clastogen is a toxin that has the capability of cause breaks in chromosomes, cause sections of them to be destroyed, and to rearrange the sections and thus cause mutations that can lead to various types of cancer.  A mutagen is a material that causes mutations and damage in DNA. When the DNA is altered, it can cause any number of chain reactions that can negatively impact the health, including cancerous growth of cells and cell division.Other than its use in darkroom photography, hydroquinone is still one of the most commonly used skin lightening agents on the market in the United States.  The ingredient has been banned due to numerous safety issues and serious toxicity concerns in Europe, Japan, and several other countries. I am not a chemist, however, it is my understanding that hydroquinone in conjunction with UV light can magnify its toxicity.

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D-76H Film Development Formula

Formula to prepare 1 liter of the stock developer

Distilled Water @ 125F/52C 500ml

Metol - 2.5g
Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous) - 100g
Borax (decahydrate) - 2g
Distilled water to make 1 liter

** Developed by Dr. Grant Haist (Kodak) as an alternative to regular D-76

Mixing Instructions

  • Heat 500ml of distilled water to 52C/125F in a clean 1000ml+ graduate
  • Dissolve 2.5g Metol in a separate and clean graduate with distilled water and then add to main 1000ml beaker
  • Dissolve 100g Sodium Sulfite in a separate and clean graduate with distilled water and then add to main 1000ml beaker
  • Dissolve 2g Borax in a clean and separate graduate using distilled water and then add to the main 1000ml beaker
  • Add chilled distilled water to the main 1000ml beaker to make 1000ml at 20C

Tip: I keep a one gallon jug of distilled water in the darkroom refrigerator at all times for this purpose.

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D-76H Usage

The D76-H formula can be used as a stock solution or 1:1. I personally use it as a one-shot developer diluted at 1+1 because I believe I get even better shadow detail.

To establish the correct development time for your black and white film, you really should properly test your film to identity the true film speed (EI) and then validate (N) normal, (N+) expanded, and (N-) contracted development times.

If you are a roll film user or you don’t need accurate or repeatable results with your films, use the Massive Dev Chart development times for D-76 as a good starting place. Since D-76 is the standard for all B&W film developers, the technical information sheet for your specific film will have a suggest development time.

A good strategy is to rate your roll film at two-thirds or one-half box speed and develop for 10% less than the suggest time.

I have tested HP5+ in D-76H using my Jobo CPP-3 processor and determined EI rating to be 200 with a N (normal) development time of 7 minutes.

CLASSIC D-76 Formula (with Hydroquinone)

Distilled Water @ 125F/52C 750ml
Metol 2g
Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous) 100g
Hydroquinone 5g
Borax (granular) 2g
Cold water to make 1 liter


If you want to review other darkroom formulas, you can visit the main Analog Photography Formulas Page.


B&W DEVELOPER PHOTOCHEMISTRY OVERVIEW BY TIM LAYTON

By understanding the basics of photochemistry and the relationships between developer components you will have the ability to select and modify formulas to meet your specific needs.

An entire book could and has been written on this topic, so keep in mind I have dramatically summarized the important points in an effort to save you time and help you apply the most important principles. 

When a photographic emulsion is exposed to light, the silver salt (i.e, silver bromide, chloride, iodide) which the light reaches, undergoes a definite, but invisible change to a form that is known as the latent image. The exposed parts of the emulsion gain an activation that makes it susceptible to the reducing action of a developer.  When placed in a developing solution the exposed (activated) particles of the silver salt are reduced chemically to black metallic silver, leaving the unexposed particles of silver salt unchanged. Reduction in this sense is a conversion of silver salt to free silver and of the reaction one or more reducing agents (developers) are necessary.  

B&W Darkroom Photography Formulary by Tim LaytonB&W Darkroom Photography Formulary by Tim Layton The Reducing Agent: You will find a variety of reducing/developing agents used in black and white film photography.  Most of them are too powerful to be used alone because they would reduce all of the silver salt in the emulsion without regard to the latent image. A proper reducing agent must be selected which confines its action to the exposed particles of the silver salt, leaving the remainder unaffected. The most common reducing agents are metol, hydroquinone, and pyro, but there are several others to include Amidol, Glycin, and Rodinal to name a few.  

The effect of the developing agent is largely dependent on the agent used and the way it is used.  You will notice in several formulas that more than one agent is used and in various ratios.  I've realized that a high percentage of hydroquinone is synonymous with brilliant images, while metol produces softer results.  Knowing this type of information can help you identify the formula that is best suited for your photography. 

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B&W Darkroom Photography Formulary by Tim LaytonB&W Darkroom Photography Formulary by Tim Layton The Alkali (Activator): In addition to the reducing/developing agent, there are three other components in a developer that play an important role.  The first is the alkali which is ordinarily essential in most developers.  Most developers in use today are neutral or slightly acidic in their normal state, and in this condition, they are not very effective as a developing agent.

When an alkaline salt like sodium carbonate or potassium carbonate, for example, is introduced into the developing solution, something very interesting takes place.  The developing agent forms an alkaline salt which makes the developing agent more sensitive.  It is this alkaline salt that actually reduces the exposed grains of silver salt to metallic silver.  The alkali has a secondary effect on the developing solution which is also important.  It helps the gelatin emulsion swell and thus facilitates the penetration of the developing solution throughout the layer of the emulsion. 

For fine-grain developers, you will typically see a less energetic activator like borax used because you want the grain size controlled (softer development).  Another alkali used is sodium metaborate which is helpful in tropical climates when the target development temperature of 68F/20C is not possible. 

You must carefully weigh the alkali in your formula because too much can cause fog and too little can result in slow and soft development.  

You will find many formulas that use sodium carbonate as the activator because in the monohydrated form it is stable and predictable. 

B&W Darkroom Photography Formulary by Tim LaytonB&W Darkroom Photography Formulary by Tim Layton The Preservative: It is a common event for the reducing agent and alkali to combine freely and easily with oxygen.  Because of this, developing agents spoil very quickly when exposed to air.  To increase their usable life, and to allow the developing agent to do its work on the exposed silver halide, and to prevent the occurrence of stains, a preservative must be added to the developing solution. 

Sodium sulfite is frequently used as the preservative in many formulas.  In developers that require two stock solutions, a slightly acidic preservative such as sodium bisulfite or potassium metabisulfite is preferred.  In some fine-grain developers, a large amount of sodium sulfite is used to aid in keeping the grain size to a minimum.  

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Because developing agents keep better in acid solution than in one which is alkaline, it is common practice to use one of these acid sulfites as the preservative in the developer part of the stock solution.  In single-solution developers, sodium bisulfite is never used alone as a preservative, since it neutralizes some of the alkali in the solution and would result in softer development. 

B&W Darkroom Photography Formulary by Tim LaytonB&W Darkroom Photography Formulary by Tim Layton The Restrainer: The fourth and final important component of a typical developing solution is the restrainer, potassium bromide.  The restrainer acts as a "brake" on the chemical reaction of development and keeps the operation under control.  An increase in the concentration of the potassium bromide will result in slower development and too little may cause development fog.

With this information under your belt, starting reviewing the formulas for your favorite film and print developers and see if you can determine the four key components: developing agent(s), alkali, preservative, restrainer.   Next, compare these formulas against each other and see if you can start to understand why it behaves the way that it does. 


GENERAL TIPS FOR SUCCESS

  • Use chemically pure materials or your resulting formulas may not perform as expected. If you purchase from the vendors listed in the resources section, you should have reasonable assurance.  
  • Mix all components of a solution in the order listed in the formula.
  • Wait until each chemical is thoroughly dissolved before adding the next component. 
  • Use distilled water and not your local tap water. 
  • Use a proper scale capable of measuring two decimal places.  
  • Try and develop your film and paper at 68F/20C for optimum results.
  • Get my time/temp development conversion chart if you need to deviate from the standard 68F/20C temperature.
  • Use all formulas as one-shot solutions and eliminate the need for replenishing solutions.​​​​​​

FORMULARY SOURCES 

You will need sources to acquire the various chemicals, tools, and materials to make your processing chemicals, so I have included a link to some of the most notable resources to help you jumpstart your search. If you know of other good sources in your area, please contact me and let me know so I can update the list. 

View my Analog Photography Chemistry Directory for suppliers around the world.


DISCLAIMER

Tim Layton With Silver Gelatin Large Format PrintTim Layton With Silver Gelatin Large Format Print I do have to mention that if you choose to use any of the information contained on this website or in my guidebooks, it is at your own risk and I am not accountable for the outcome, your personal safety, nor do I guarantee anything by sharing this information.  The lawyers make me say this stuff...   

As with all chemicals, you should properly research each individual component and understand its purpose and potential hazards before using it in your own environment.

All of the information in the B&W Analog Photography Formulary is the public domain and has been published many times by various sources over the last 100+ years.  It is for this reason along with the fact that I may not accurately provide credit to the original publisher that I do not always cite each formula or recipe.

 

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ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY TRAINING LIBRARY

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

Buy Your Photography, Video, & Technology Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

B&H Photo VideoB&H Photo Video COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white D-76 darkroom film fine art Kodak large format photography https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/how-to-mix-d-76-b-w-film-developer-at-home-save-a-lot-of-money Fri, 23 Apr 2021 11:29:51 GMT
Working & Creating Through The Pain https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/working-creating-through-the-pain Working and Creating Through The Pain by Tim LaytonWorking and Creating Through The Pain by Tim Layton In case you don't already know, my youngest daughter Abby was tragically killed in a car accident on April 15, 2021. 

I am openly sharing my pain and suffering in hopes that it may help someone else. 

It has only been one week since I got the call that my daughter was killed in an auto accident on her way home from school.  I basically don't know how to process all of these feelings and emotions. 

I am writing this article today because I can't sit and dwell on these horrible thoughts.  I am not sure what to do, so I am just trying my best to put one foot in front of the other.

I have been walking for miles every morning because being outside and exercising somehow brings me some relief for a short time.  After I complete my basic human requirements like showering and eating, I am not sure what to do with myself.  

Today, I decided to at least attempt to work a little bit and see how that went.  I can't focus for long, but I am pushing through and trying to keep creating because creating new artwork is at the center of my soul.  It has brought me great joy for many years and hopefully it may in the future again.  

I don't feel up to going out in the field right now, so I am looking through my sizable backlog of negatives for possible candidates that I want to pursue.  

I am sure there are many people that read this article today have experienced similar loss.  I offer my sincere condolences to you.  Losing a parent or sibling is horribly difficult, but losing a child is beyond anything that I can accurately describe in words.  

I will close this brief article today with a plea.  Abby wasn't wearing a seat belt and while there is no way to be absolutely certain she would have survived if she was, I believe it could have made a significant difference.  I encourage all parents to be diligent, even with your adult children to remind them to wear their seat belts at all times whether they are driving or a passenger.  If Abby's tragedy can possibly help save a life in the future, then I know that would be exactly what she would want.   

-Tim Layton

If you would like to connect with me on Facebook, I provide a lot of my behind the scenes updates for my friends and family here.  Follow my new YouTube Channel to see the new videos as I design and build out the new darkroom.

 

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ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY TRAINING LIBRARY

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

Buy Your Photography, Video, & Technology Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

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Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) Creating Death Pain Suffering Surviving https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/working-creating-through-the-pain Thu, 22 Apr 2021 19:24:07 GMT
Video: Making The Platinum Print "Wildheart" https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/video-making-the-platinum-print-wildheart In this video, I share my process for making "Wildheart" platinum print. 

If you would like to connect with me on Facebook, I provide a lot of my behind the scenes updates for my friends and family here.  Follow my new YouTube Channel to see the new videos as I design and build out the new darkroom.

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Free Darkroom Diary Newsletter by Tim Layton

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ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY TRAINING LIBRARY

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

Buy Your Photography, Video, & Technology Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

B&H Photo VideoB&H Photo Video COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) Palladium Platinum Wild Horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/video-making-the-platinum-print-wildheart Thu, 22 Apr 2021 19:02:59 GMT
Video: Making The Platinum Print "A New King" https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/video-making-the-platinum-print-a-new-king In this video, I share my process for making "A New King" platinum print. 

If you would like to connect with me on Facebook, I provide a lot of my behind the scenes updates for my friends and family here.  Follow my new YouTube Channel to see the new videos as I design and build out the new darkroom.

Analog Photography Learning Library by Tim LaytonAnalog Photography Learning Library by Tim Layton

Free Darkroom Diary Newsletter by Tim Layton

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ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY TRAINING LIBRARY

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

Buy Your Photography, Video, & Technology Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

B&H Photo VideoB&H Photo Video COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) Palladium Platinum Wild Horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/video-making-the-platinum-print-a-new-king Thu, 22 Apr 2021 19:01:18 GMT
In Loving Memory of My Baby Girl - Abigail Elizabeth Layton https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/in-loving-memory-of-my-baby-girl-abigail-elizabeth-layton In Loving Memory of My Baby Girl - Abigal Elizabeth LaytonIn Loving Memory of My Baby Girl - Abigal Elizabeth Layton I share this article today with great pain in my heart, in fact, this pain is so great that I am unable to articulate it in words.

I don't believe that it is possible to truly understand this type of pain unless you experience it.  

I feel like I can personally take on just about anything in regards to myself, but when you get the tragic news that your youngest daughter was just killed in a car accident, your entire world gets turned upside down in the matter of a few seconds. 

The day started like most other days.  I went to work in my office, checking and responding to emails, and I had a few meetings scheduled.  Abby went to school, just like any other Wednesday, but this one was different.  

On her ride home from school with her boyfriend there was an accident on the highway.  She was ejected from the vehicle and didn't survive the crash.  She unfortunately was not wearing her seat belt, but her boyfriend was, and he survived the crash.  

You might be wondering why I am sharing something so deeply personal with you? 

I believe based on what I know that if Abby was wearing her seat belt, she would most likely be here today. 

I don't want another young person to lose their life over not wearing a seat belt, so I am on a mission to raise awareness about the importance and potentially life saving benefit of always wearing your seat belt while driving or being a passenger in a motor vehicle. 

I have been through many challenging and painful events in my life, but losing Abby is the type of pain that words cannot describe.  

I hope that I can find a way in the future to use Abby's horrible tragedy to help others.  For now, I know that I just need to start this journey by trying to save other young people by raising awareness about the importance of always wearing a seat belt.    

I will continue to write as I navigate my way through the grieving process because I want to keep Abby's memory alive and share what a wonderfully unique, talented, and special young lady she was.  Her life was just getting started.  Losing her at only 21 years old is nothing short of heartbreaking.   

Both Abby and I share I deep love and appreciation for nature.  I found my love for nature and wildlife as a very young boy and Abby discovered her love for nature as a teenager.  I believe I planted the love of nature in Abby because I took her on many hikes and outdoor adventures throughout her childhood.  Some of my most cherished photos of Abby are of us hiking and being in the outdoors.  

She also loved animals, especially cats and dogs.  She loved them so much, she could never have just one.

In her memory, I am creating Free NatureArtRx 4K videos that are specifically designed to use the healing powers of nature to lower your stress, help you relax, and even help you sleep better. 

I am struggling with stress, anxiety, and loss of sleep right now so I am trying to use my pain and suffering in a positive way by creating these new videos in Abby's honor.  


NatureArtRx Films by Tim LaytonNatureArtRx Films by Tim Layton

HEALING POWERS OF NATURE

Scientists and medical researchers have confirmed the healing power of nature in over fifty years of clinical and medical-based research.  We don't need doctors and researchers to tell us what we already know.  Nature has an amazing positive range of impacts on our mind and bodies and it is smart to connect with nature in any way that you can every day. 

Connecting with and being in nature has been proven to be beneficial for both human cognitive functioning and emotional wellbeing at all stages of life (Zaradic & Pergams, 2007) and we know that exposure to nature in any form increases intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual and physical development. (Kellert, 2005)

Researchers have also discovered that nature sounds change the connections in our brains, taking down the body’s fight-or-flight response. The nervous system prepares to fight or flee a threatening situation by releasing the hormones cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline. These stress hormones make it impossible to get a good night’s sleep.

Researchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School in England have determined that nature’s sounds, in contrast to artificial noise, build up the “rest-digest” response instead.  This opposite response to “fight-or-flight” helps the body relax and fall to sleep. 

This research study, published in Scientific Reports, is noteworthy for the use of heart-rate monitors, functional magnetic resonance imaging scans (fMRI) and social experiments to determine why the body reacts so positively to natural environments.

🔔 Free Video Library Better Sleep | Relaxation | Meditation

I suggest practicing slow and deep breathing to help relieve stress and emotional anxiety. Deep breathing is also known to relieve pain, improve your mood, improve focus, increase energy, and even improve your heart function.

Start with one minute deep breathing exercises and build up over time.  I honestly believe if you do this simple task, you will start receiving the positive benefits immediately. 

You can cast the video to your television in full 4K or watch on your larger desktop computer screen to get a deeper and more immersive experience connecting sight and sound together. 

By combining the therapeutic sounds of the rain falling with the ultra high definition video of the rain falling on the river, we are sending audio and visual queues to your mind and body to help you relax.

DEEP BREATHING

Did you know that deep breathing offers numerous health benefits, from stress reduction to a slower heartbeat and reduced blood pressure.  Additionally, deep breathing is particularly helpful for managing stress. Stressful thoughts may cause the "fight or flight" response, also known as the stress response, as a reaction to a perceived danger. With the stress response, the body's sympathetic nervous system alerts nerve pathways to trigger the adrenal glands, which then release adrenaline into the bloodstream. This adrenaline burst increases your blood pressure and pulse rate and may cause you to breathe short, shallow breaths from your chest.  

By breathing deeply from your diaphragm, you ignite the body's parasympathetic nervous system. This system reverses the stress response by slowing the heart rate, lowering blood pressure and calming the mind. With deep breaths, you can activate the body's relaxation response, a state of profound calm.

BENEFITS OF NATURE

Intellectual

Supports creativity and problem solving (Kellert, 2005) Enhances cognitive skills (Wells, 2000)

Reduces symptoms of the Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) (Kuo & Taylor, 2004)

Improves academic performance (Cooper, 2015)

Emotional/Social

Improves social relations (Burdette & Whitaker, 2005)

Improves self-discipline, Peace, self-control (Taylor, Kuo, & Sullivan, 2001)

Physical

Increases physical activity (Bell & Dyment, 2008)

Improves awareness and caution about nutrition (Koch, Waliczek, & Zajicek, 2006)

Encourage healthy behavior (Bell & Dyment, 2008)

Improves eyesight (less myopia, nearsightedness) (Rose, et al., 2008)

Reduces stress (Wells & Evans, 2003)

]]>
(Tim Layton Fine Art) Calming Deep Sleep Meditation Nature Nature Therapy Ocean Relaxation Sleep Sounds of Nature Water Waves https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/in-loving-memory-of-my-baby-girl-abigail-elizabeth-layton Mon, 19 Apr 2021 03:10:54 GMT
[TROPICAL WATERFALL] DEEP RELAXATION | FALL ASLEEP FAST (60 Min) 4K https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/tropical-waterfall-deep-relaxation-fall-asleep-fast-60-min-4k Tropical Waterfall | Fall Asleep Fast, Relax, Meditate | NatureArtRx FilmsTropical Waterfall | Fall Asleep Fast, Relax, Meditate | NatureArtRx Films Unwind and relax listening to this amazing tropical waterfall. Watch the 4K video for a totally immersive experience.   

You can enjoy this 1 hour of waterfall to help you go to sleep fast or relax at any time of the day or night.

After a few minutes, you can literally feel the stress leaving your body.

Science has confirmed in many credible studies that listening to nature helps us sleep better. We already know the soothing power of nature’s sounds calms our minds and slows our hearts down.

Researchers have discovered that nature sounds change the connections in our brains, taking down the body’s fight-or-flight response. The nervous system prepares to fight or flee a threatening situation by releasing the hormones cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline. These stress hormones make it impossible to get a good night’s sleep.

Researchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School in England have determined that nature’s sounds, in contrast to artificial noise, build up the “rest-digest” response instead.  This opposite response to “fight-or-flight” helps the body relax and fall to sleep. 

This research study, published in Scientific Reports, is noteworthy for the use of heart-rate monitors, functional magnetic resonance imaging scans (fMRI) and social experiments to determine why the body reacts so positively to natural environments.

🔔 Free Video Library Better Sleep | Relaxation | Meditation

I suggest practicing slow and deep breathing to help relieve stress and emotional anxiety. Deep breathing is also known to relieve pain, improve your mood, improve focus, increase energy, and even improve your heart function.

Start with one minute deep breathing exercises and build up over time.  I honestly believe if you do this simple task, you will start receiving the positive benefits immediately. 

You can cast the video to your television in full 4K or watch on your larger desktop computer screen to get a deeper and more immersive experience connecting sight and sound together. 

By combining the therapeutic sounds of the rain falling with the ultra high definition video of the rain falling on the river, we are sending audio and visual queues to your mind and body to help you relax.

DEEP BREATHING

Did you know that deep breathing offers numerous health benefits, from stress reduction to a slower heartbeat and reduced blood pressure.  Additionally, deep breathing is particularly helpful for managing stress. Stressful thoughts may cause the "fight or flight" response, also known as the stress response, as a reaction to a perceived danger. With the stress response, the body's sympathetic nervous system alerts nerve pathways to trigger the adrenal glands, which then release adrenaline into the bloodstream. This adrenaline burst increases your blood pressure and pulse rate and may cause you to breathe short, shallow breaths from your chest.  

By breathing deeply from your diaphragm, you ignite the body's parasympathetic nervous system. This system reverses the stress response by slowing the heart rate, lowering blood pressure and calming the mind. With deep breaths, you can activate the body's relaxation response, a state of profound calm.

NatureArtRx Films by Tim LaytonNatureArtRx Films by Tim Layton

Many people because of busy schedules or lack of access to nature simply don't have the ability to experience and benefit from the positive and healing powers of nature. 

I have created a completely free library of therapeutic nature and wildlife videos on YouTube, so you can get your daily dose of nature and feed your mind and body with goodness.  My hope is that you will sleep better, feel more relaxed, and have a joyful day. 

Use the videos and sounds to help you fall asleep fast, relax at any time during the day or night, and use for meditation or while you are exercising too.

🔔 Free Video Library Better Sleep | Relaxation | Meditation

NatureArtRx Films is dedicated to bringing you calming and relaxing music, nature sounds, and stunning 4K video for better sleep, relaxation, and meditation.

Join us daily and start sleeping better and feeling more relaxed.

HEALING POWERS OF NATURE

Scientists and medical researchers have confirmed the healing power of nature in over fifty years of clinical and medical-based research.  We don't need doctors and researchers to tell us what we already know.  Nature has an amazing positive range of impacts on our mind and bodies and it is smart to connect with nature in any way that you can every day. 

Connecting with and being in nature has been proven to be beneficial for both human cognitive functioning and emotional wellbeing at all stages of life (Zaradic & Pergams, 2007) and we know that exposure to nature in any form increases intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual and physical development. (Kellert, 2005).

BENEFITS OF NATURE

Intellectual

Supports creativity and problem solving (Kellert, 2005) Enhances cognitive skills (Wells, 2000)

Reduces symptoms of the Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) (Kuo & Taylor, 2004)

Improves academic performance (Cooper, 2015)

Emotional/Social

Improves social relations (Burdette & Whitaker, 2005)

Improves self-discipline, Peace, self-control (Taylor, Kuo, & Sullivan, 2001)

Physical

Increases physical activity (Bell & Dyment, 2008)

Improves awareness and caution about nutrition (Koch, Waliczek, & Zajicek, 2006)

Encourage healthy behavior (Bell & Dyment, 2008)

Improves eyesight (less myopia, nearsightedness) (Rose, et al., 2008)

Reduces stress (Wells & Evans, 2003)

 

]]>
(Tim Layton Fine Art) birds singing calming deep sleep meditation nature nature therapy rain relaxation sleep songbirds sounds of nature water https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/tropical-waterfall-deep-relaxation-fall-asleep-fast-60-min-4k Mon, 12 Apr 2021 16:35:49 GMT
[NATURE SOUNDS] RELAXING BIRDS SINGING (60 Min) 4K https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/nature-sounds-relaxing-birds-singing-60-min-4k Relaxing Birds Singing | Fall Asleep Fast, Meditate, Relax and DestressRelaxing Birds Singing | Fall Asleep Fast, Meditate, Relax and Destress Unwind and relax listening to birds singing in nature. Watch the 4K video for a totally immersive experience.   

You can enjoy this 1 hour of the sound of birds singing in nature.  This can help you go to sleep or relax at any time of the day or night.

After a few minutes, you can literally feel the stress leaving your body.

Science has confirmed in many credible studies that listening to nature helps us sleep better. We already know the soothing power of nature’s sounds calms our minds and slows our hearts down.

Researchers have discovered that nature sounds change the connections in our brains, taking down the body’s fight-or-flight response. The nervous system prepares to fight or flee a threatening situation by releasing the hormones cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline. These stress hormones make it impossible to get a good night’s sleep.

Researchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School in England have determined that nature’s sounds, in contrast to artificial noise, build up the “rest-digest” response instead.  This opposite response to “fight-or-flight” helps the body relax and fall to sleep. 

This research study, published in Scientific Reports, is noteworthy for the use of heart-rate monitors, functional magnetic resonance imaging scans (fMRI) and social experiments to determine why the body reacts so positively to natural environments.

🔔 Free Video Library Better Sleep | Relaxation | Meditation

I suggest practicing slow and deep breathing to help relieve stress and emotional anxiety. Deep breathing is also known to relieve pain, improve your mood, improve focus, increase energy, and even improve your heart function.

Start with one minute deep breathing exercises and build up over time.  I honestly believe if you do this simple task, you will start receiving the positive benefits immediately. 

You can cast the video to your television in full 4K or watch on your larger desktop computer screen to get a deeper and more immersive experience connecting sight and sound together. 

By combining the therapeutic sounds of the rain falling with the ultra high definition video of the rain falling on the river, we are sending audio and visual queues to your mind and body to help you relax.

DEEP BREATHING

Did you know that deep breathing offers numerous health benefits, from stress reduction to a slower heartbeat and reduced blood pressure.  Additionally, deep breathing is particularly helpful for managing stress. Stressful thoughts may cause the "fight or flight" response, also known as the stress response, as a reaction to a perceived danger. With the stress response, the body's sympathetic nervous system alerts nerve pathways to trigger the adrenal glands, which then release adrenaline into the bloodstream. This adrenaline burst increases your blood pressure and pulse rate and may cause you to breathe short, shallow breaths from your chest.  

By breathing deeply from your diaphragm, you ignite the body's parasympathetic nervous system. This system reverses the stress response by slowing the heart rate, lowering blood pressure and calming the mind. With deep breaths, you can activate the body's relaxation response, a state of profound calm.

NatureArtRx Films by Tim LaytonNatureArtRx Films by Tim Layton

Many people because of busy schedules or lack of access to nature simply don't have the ability to experience and benefit from the positive and healing powers of nature. 

I have created a completely free library of therapeutic nature and wildlife videos on YouTube, so you can get your daily dose of nature and feed your mind and body with goodness.  My hope is that you will sleep better, feel more relaxed, and have a joyful day. 

Use the videos and sounds to help you fall asleep fast, relax at any time during the day or night, and use for meditation or while you are exercising too.

🔔 Free Video Library Better Sleep | Relaxation | Meditation

NatureArtRx Films is dedicated to bringing you calming and relaxing music, nature sounds, and stunning 4K video for better sleep, relaxation, and meditation.

Join us daily and start sleeping better and feeling more relaxed.

HEALING POWERS OF NATURE

Scientists and medical researchers have confirmed the healing power of nature in over fifty years of clinical and medical-based research.  We don't need doctors and researchers to tell us what we already know.  Nature has an amazing positive range of impacts on our mind and bodies and it is smart to connect with nature in any way that you can every day. 

Connecting with and being in nature has been proven to be beneficial for both human cognitive functioning and emotional wellbeing at all stages of life (Zaradic & Pergams, 2007) and we know that exposure to nature in any form increases intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual and physical development. (Kellert, 2005).

BENEFITS OF NATURE

Intellectual

Supports creativity and problem solving (Kellert, 2005) Enhances cognitive skills (Wells, 2000)

Reduces symptoms of the Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) (Kuo & Taylor, 2004)

Improves academic performance (Cooper, 2015)

Emotional/Social

Improves social relations (Burdette & Whitaker, 2005)

Improves self-discipline, Peace, self-control (Taylor, Kuo, & Sullivan, 2001)

Physical

Increases physical activity (Bell & Dyment, 2008)

Improves awareness and caution about nutrition (Koch, Waliczek, & Zajicek, 2006)

Encourage healthy behavior (Bell & Dyment, 2008)

Improves eyesight (less myopia, nearsightedness) (Rose, et al., 2008)

Reduces stress (Wells & Evans, 2003)

 

]]>
(Tim Layton Fine Art) birds singing calming deep sleep meditation nature nature therapy rain relaxation sleep songbirds sounds of nature water https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/nature-sounds-relaxing-birds-singing-60-min-4k Mon, 12 Apr 2021 16:08:33 GMT
LIGHT RAIN & BIRDS SINGING | FALL ASLEEP FAST | SOUND OF LIGHT RAIN | 4K https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/light-rain-birds-singing Light Rain & Birds Singing For Better Sleep, Relaxation, & Meditation by NatureArtRx FilmsLight Rain & Birds Singing For Better Sleep, Relaxation, & Meditation by NatureArtRx Films Light Rain & Birds Singing is a 4K UHD movie of light rain falling on a river scene with birds chirping and singing. 

You can enjoy this 1 hour of the sound of rain falling to help you go to sleep or relax at any time of the day or night.

After a few minutes, you can literally feel the stress leaving your body.  

The hypnotic sounds of rain queues to your mind to relax and be peaceful.

Science has confirmed in many credible studies that listening to nature helps us sleep better. We already know the soothing power of nature’s sounds calms our minds and slows our hearts down.

Researchers have discovered that nature sounds change the connections in our brains, taking down the body’s fight-or-flight response. The nervous system prepares to fight or flee a threatening situation by releasing the hormones cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline. These stress hormones make it impossible to get a good night’s sleep.

Researchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School in England have determined that nature’s sounds, in contrast to artificial noise, build up the “rest-digest” response instead.  This opposite response to “fight-or-flight” helps the body relax and fall to sleep. 

This research study, published in Scientific Reports, is noteworthy for the use of heart-rate monitors, functional magnetic resonance imaging scans (fMRI) and social experiments to determine why the body reacts so positively to natural environments.

🔔 Free Video Library Better Sleep | Relaxation | Meditation

I suggest practicing slow and deep breathing to help relieve stress and emotional anxiety. Deep breathing is also known to relieve pain, improve your mood, improve focus, increase energy, and even improve your heart function.

Start with one minute deep breathing exercises and build up over time.  I honestly believe if you do this simple task, you will start receiving the positive benefits immediately. 

You can cast the video to your television in full 4K or watch on your larger desktop computer screen to get a deeper and more immersive experience connecting sight and sound together. 

By combining the therapeutic sounds of the rain falling with the ultra high definition video of the rain falling on the river, we are sending audio and visual queues to your mind and body to help you relax.

DEEP BREATHING

Did you know that deep breathing offers numerous health benefits, from stress reduction to a slower heartbeat and reduced blood pressure.  Additionally, deep breathing is particularly helpful for managing stress. Stressful thoughts may cause the "fight or flight" response, also known as the stress response, as a reaction to a perceived danger. With the stress response, the body's sympathetic nervous system alerts nerve pathways to trigger the adrenal glands, which then release adrenaline into the bloodstream. This adrenaline burst increases your blood pressure and pulse rate and may cause you to breathe short, shallow breaths from your chest.  

By breathing deeply from your diaphragm, you ignite the body's parasympathetic nervous system. This system reverses the stress response by slowing the heart rate, lowering blood pressure and calming the mind. With deep breaths, you can activate the body's relaxation response, a state of profound calm.

NatureArtRx Films by Tim LaytonNatureArtRx Films by Tim Layton

Many people because of busy schedules or lack of access to nature simply don't have the ability to experience and benefit from the positive and healing powers of nature. 

I have created a completely free library of therapeutic nature and wildlife videos on YouTube, so you can get your daily dose of nature and feed your mind and body with goodness.  My hope is that you will sleep better, feel more relaxed, and have a joyful day. 

Use the videos and sounds to help you fall asleep fast, relax at any time during the day or night, and use for meditation or while you are exercising too.

🔔 Free Video Library Better Sleep | Relaxation | Meditation

NatureArtRx Films is dedicated to bringing you calming and relaxing music, nature sounds, and stunning 4K video for better sleep, relaxation, and meditation.

Join us daily and start sleeping better and feeling more relaxed.

HEALING POWERS OF NATURE

Scientists and medical researchers have confirmed the healing power of nature in over fifty years of clinical and medical-based research.  We don't need doctors and researchers to tell us what we already know.  Nature has an amazing positive range of impacts on our mind and bodies and it is smart to connect with nature in any way that you can every day. 

Connecting with and being in nature has been proven to be beneficial for both human cognitive functioning and emotional wellbeing at all stages of life (Zaradic & Pergams, 2007) and we know that exposure to nature in any form increases intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual and physical development. (Kellert, 2005).

BENEFITS OF NATURE

Intellectual

Supports creativity and problem solving (Kellert, 2005) Enhances cognitive skills (Wells, 2000)

Reduces symptoms of the Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) (Kuo & Taylor, 2004)

Improves academic performance (Cooper, 2015)

Emotional/Social

Improves social relations (Burdette & Whitaker, 2005)

Improves self-discipline, Peace, self-control (Taylor, Kuo, & Sullivan, 2001)

Physical

Increases physical activity (Bell & Dyment, 2008)

Improves awareness and caution about nutrition (Koch, Waliczek, & Zajicek, 2006)

Encourage healthy behavior (Bell & Dyment, 2008)

Improves eyesight (less myopia, nearsightedness) (Rose, et al., 2008)

Reduces stress (Wells & Evans, 2003)

 

]]>
(Tim Layton Fine Art) Birds Singing Calming Deep Sleep Meditation Nature Nature Therapy Rain Relaxation Sleep Songbirds Sounds of Nature Water https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/light-rain-birds-singing Thu, 08 Apr 2021 11:44:49 GMT
Ocean Waves Nature Sounds & 4K Video For Better Sleeping, Relaxing, & Meditation https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/ocean-waves-no-1 Calming Ocean Waves | Fall Asleep Fast, Relax, Meditate | NatureArtRx FilmsCalming Ocean Waves | Fall Asleep Fast, Relax, Meditate | NatureArtRx Films Calming Ocean Waves is a 4K UHD movie of ocean waves gently lapping up on the shore creating a rhythmic and relaxing random pattern that only nature can provide. 

I have 10 minute,  30 minute and 60 minute versions so you can relax to the soothing and calming sounds that releases the stress from you body and calms your mind. 

The rhythmic sounds of the water sends queues to your mind to relax and be peaceful.  

The sounds of the waves coming in and then retreating back to the ocean create a peaceful break that you can take at any time of the day or night. 

This 10 minute version of Ocean Waves is a great opportunity to take a quick break during day or during lunch or you can even start your day to clear your mind.

For getting to sleep or for meditation, try the longer 30 minute or 60 minute versions. 

Science has confirmed in many credible studies that listening to nature helps us sleep better. We already know the soothing power of nature’s sounds calms our minds and slows our hearts down.

Researchers have discovered that nature sounds change the connections in our brains, taking down the body’s fight-or-flight response. The nervous system prepares to fight or flee a threatening situation by releasing the hormones cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline. These stress hormones make it impossible to get a good night’s sleep.

Researchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School in England have determined that nature’s sounds, in contrast to artificial noise, build up the “rest-digest” response instead.  This opposite response to “fight-or-flight” helps the body relax and fall to sleep. 

This research study, published in Scientific Reports, is noteworthy for the use of heart-rate monitors, functional magnetic resonance imaging scans (fMRI) and social experiments to determine why the body reacts so positively to natural environments.

🔔 Free Video Library Better Sleep | Relaxation | Meditation

10 Minute Version30 Minute Version | 60 Minute Version

I suggest practicing slow and deep breathing to help relieve stress and emotional anxiety. Deep breathing is also known to relieve pain, improve your mood, improve focus, increase energy, and even improve your heart function.

See if you can synchronize your deep breathing with the flow of the ocean waves. 

You can cast the video to your television in full 4K or watch on your larger desktop computer screen to get a deeper and more immersive experience connecting sight and sound together. 

By combining the therapeutic sounds of the ocean waves with the ultra high definition video of the ocean, we are sending audio and visual queues to your mind and body to help you relax.

DEEP BREATHING

Did you know that deep breathing offers numerous health benefits, from stress reduction to a slower heartbeat and reduced blood pressure.  Additionally, deep breathing is particularly helpful for managing stress. Stressful thoughts may cause the "fight or flight" response, also known as the stress response, as a reaction to a perceived danger. With the stress response, the body's sympathetic nervous system alerts nerve pathways to trigger the adrenal glands, which then release adrenaline into the bloodstream. This adrenaline burst increases your blood pressure and pulse rate and may cause you to breathe short, shallow breaths from your chest.  

By breathing deeply from your diaphragm, you ignite the body's parasympathetic nervous system. This system reverses the stress response by slowing the heart rate, lowering blood pressure and calming the mind. With deep breaths, you can activate the body's relaxation response, a state of profound calm.

NatureArtRx Films by Tim LaytonNatureArtRx Films by Tim Layton

Many people because of busy schedules or lack of access to nature simply don't have the ability to experience and benefit from the positive and healing powers of nature. 

I have created a completely free library of therapeutic nature and wildlife videos on YouTube, so you can get your daily dose of nature and feed your mind and body with goodness.  My hope is that you will sleep better, feel more relaxed, and have a joyful day. 

Use the videos and sounds to help you fall asleep fast, relax at any time during the day or night, and use for meditation or while you are exercising too.

🔔 Free Video Library Better Sleep | Relaxation | Meditation

NatureArtRx Films is dedicated to bringing you calming and relaxing music, nature sounds, and stunning 4K video for better sleep, relaxation, and meditation.

Join us daily and start sleeping better and feeling more relaxed.

HEALING POWERS OF NATURE

Scientists and medical researchers have confirmed the healing power of nature in over fifty years of clinical and medical-based research.  We don't need doctors and researchers to tell us what we already know.  Nature has an amazing positive range of impacts on our mind and bodies and it is smart to connect with nature in any way that you can every day. 

Connecting with and being in nature has been proven to be beneficial for both human cognitive functioning and emotional wellbeing at all stages of life (Zaradic & Pergams, 2007) and we know that exposure to nature in any form increases intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual and physical development. (Kellert, 2005).

BENEFITS OF NATURE

Intellectual

Supports creativity and problem solving (Kellert, 2005) Enhances cognitive skills (Wells, 2000)

Reduces symptoms of the Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) (Kuo & Taylor, 2004)

Improves academic performance (Cooper, 2015)

Emotional/Social

Improves social relations (Burdette & Whitaker, 2005)

Improves self-discipline, Peace, self-control (Taylor, Kuo, & Sullivan, 2001)

Physical

Increases physical activity (Bell & Dyment, 2008)

Improves awareness and caution about nutrition (Koch, Waliczek, & Zajicek, 2006)

Encourage healthy behavior (Bell & Dyment, 2008)

Improves eyesight (less myopia, nearsightedness) (Rose, et al., 2008)

Reduces stress (Wells & Evans, 2003)
 

]]>
(Tim Layton Fine Art) Calming Deep Sleep Meditation Nature Nature Therapy Ocean Relaxation Sleep Sounds of Nature Water Waves https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/ocean-waves-no-1 Mon, 05 Apr 2021 04:01:09 GMT
NatureArtRx Films by Tim Layton https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/natureartrx-films-by-tim-layton NatureArtRx Films For Better Sleep, Relaxation, & MeditationNatureArtRx Films For Better Sleep, Relaxation, & Meditation If you have been following me for very long, then you already know that I spent over three decades making handmade silver gelatin and platinum prints in the darkroom. 

I taught workshops for many years and made friends with photographers all around the world. It was an amazing chapter of my life and I wouldn't trade it for anything.   

I retired from Tim Layton Fine Art last year and effectively that just means that I get to finally follow and pursue my own work and passion projects. 

I couldn't be more excited about the future and this next chapter. 

The two key areas that I am focused on moving forward are making platinum and palladium wild horse prints and creating nature videos that help people relax, sleep better, and hopefully even feel better. 

I am starting a brand new YouTube Channel for NatureArtRx where I will be sharing the new nature and wildlife videos.

Many people because of busy schedules or lack of access to nature simply don't have the ability to experience and benefit from the positive and healing powers of nature. 

NatureArtRx Films by Tim LaytonNatureArtRx Films by Tim Layton

I have created a completely free library of therapeutic nature and wildlife videos on YouTube, so you can get your daily dose of nature and feed your mind and body with goodness.  My hope is that you will sleep better, feel more relaxed, and have a joyful day. 

Use the videos and sounds to help you fall asleep fast, relax at any time during the day or night, and use for meditation or while you are exercising too.

🔔 Free Video Library - Better Sleep, Relaxation, & Meditation

NatureArtRx Films is dedicated to bringing you calming and relaxing music, nature sounds, and stunning 4K video for better sleep, relaxation, and meditation.

Join me daily and start sleeping better and feeling more relaxed.

HEALING POWERS OF NATURE

Scientists and medical researchers have confirmed the healing power of nature in over fifty years of clinical and medical-based research.  We don't need doctors and researchers to tell us what we already know.  Nature has an amazing positive range of impacts on our mind and bodies and it is smart to connect with nature in any way that you can every day. 

Connecting with and being in nature has been proven to be beneficial for both human cognitive functioning and emotional wellbeing at all stages of life (Zaradic & Pergams, 2007) and we know that exposure to nature in any form increases intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual and physical development. (Kellert, 2005).

BENEFITS OF NATURE

Intellectual

Supports creativity and problem solving (Kellert, 2005) Enhances cognitive skills (Wells, 2000)

Reduces symptoms of the Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) (Kuo & Taylor, 2004)

Improves academic performance (Cooper, 2015)

Emotional/Social

Improves social relations (Burdette & Whitaker, 2005)

Improves self-discipline, Peace, self-control (Taylor, Kuo, & Sullivan, 2001)

Physical

Increases physical activity (Bell & Dyment, 2008)

Improves awareness and caution about nutrition (Koch, Waliczek, & Zajicek, 2006)

Encourage healthy behavior (Bell & Dyment, 2008)

Improves eyesight (less myopia, nearsightedness) (Rose, et al., 2008)

Reduces stress (Wells & Evans, 2003)

]]>
(Tim Layton Fine Art) Art For Healing Better Health Biodiversity Biophilia Biophilic Design Good Health Happiness Healing Love Natural Light Nature Neurological Nourishment Outdoors Relaxing Restoration Stress Reduction Sunshine Therapeutic Water Water Therapy Well-Being Wellness https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/4/natureartrx-films-by-tim-layton Sat, 03 Apr 2021 22:41:42 GMT
Running Free & Wild - Wild Horses of Shannon County Missouri https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/running-free-and-wild Wild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim Layton The day started like most other days. 

Little did I know that by later that morning I would be able to see a beautiful mare running free in a winter's fresh snow showing her strength, power, and agility. 

Tim Layton - Wild Horses of Missouri Broadfoot HerdTim Layton - Wild Horses of Missouri Broadfoot Herd This mare running full out in the fresh show is a symbol of freedom.  Seeing her run gives me hope that I can be free too.

She is doing exactly what she was born to do watching her run in her natural environment and thriving is pure joy. 

I often think about the 50 or so wild horses that make up the four main herds in Shannon County, Missouri.  You can learn more about their history below the main article, but I can assure you they are truly wild.  No one is feeding them, providing any type of medical care, or anything that could be thought of as directly helping them.  

The executive order signed by President Bill Clinton on October 3, 1996 did something very important for the horses.  The horses are protected by law and a permanent part of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways, which is part of the national park system.  That order allows for up to 50 horses to freely roam the National Scenic Riverways and an agreement with the Wild Horse League of Missouri allows them to capture some horses when the herds exceed the allowance.  The captured horses are adopted out to good homes.

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In the photos below, you can see the elegance, power, and beauty of this mare in her prime.  She is part of the Broadfoot herd which currently has 14 members.  Recently there were 15, so I am unclear at the time of this article the status of the 15th member.  

Based on observation this winter, I can see that at least two mares are pregnant and will be delivering new foals this spring. New foals, just like new babies are nothing short of amazing and magical.  I can barely wait to see the new foals.  Wild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim Layton

B&H Photo VideoB&H Photo Video COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) Broadfoot Herd Freedom Mare Missouri Shannon County Wild Horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/running-free-and-wild Sun, 31 Jan 2021 19:01:59 GMT
The Broadfoot Herd Trio in Fresh Winter Snow https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/the-broadfoot-herd-trio-in-fresh-winter-snow Wild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim Layton I was very fortunate to find the Broadfoot herd today right after sunrise in the fresh winter snow. 

The three mares that you see in this photograph were very alert and highly aware of anything new in their environment.

I was probably 400+ yards away from them when I found them and they already knew that I was in their space.  

I spotted the herd right after sunrise in the fresh snow.  Not a single track in the snow made the fields look like a painting.

The horses as well as the setting at Broadfoot on this morning was simply magical.  

If you would like to continue following my latest analog photography, visit my new website where I am creating handmade platinum and palladium prints of wild horses across North America. 

I felt like a small child filled full of pure joy and happiness.  I was completely relieved of all the adult stresses that we constantly manage and I felt free and fully engaged in watching the horses in their natural environment.

Many people probably don't realize the majority of my time in the field involves tracking, walking, and sitting for long periods of time.  I watch the horses for long periods of time with my camera at my side so that I can enjoy them without the distraction of the camera.  

I often lose track of time and forget to eat when I am tracking and watching the wild horses.

I encourage people to get out and view wild horses or any type of wildlife because it is a great way to relax and be reminded of how simple life can be.  Their social bonds and interactions can teach us how to be better people and remind us how important family is in life. 

One of the things that I have noticed over the years about the Broadfoot herd is they seem to vary in their sensitivity to outsiders.  

I have seen the herd so sensitive that they run away when the wind blows in their direction and other times they seem to be completely oblivious to external visitors in their environment. I am not sure I have a clear understanding why this varies so much, and hopefully over time I may get a better idea.

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

TIPS FOR VIEWING & WATCHING WILD HORSES

Wild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim Layton In order to successfully view and enjoy wild horses for more than a few seconds, it is important to approach them in a non-predatory stance and never get too close.  Most guidelines encourage people to never get closer than 40 to 50 yards, even if the horses will allow it because wild horses are unpredictable and close human contact is a threat to their continued wellbeing. 

Horses are prey animals with eyes on the side of their heads to help them watch for predators while grazing.  

Their ears and nostrils can detect you before you ever see them.  It is a good idea to keep a close eye on their ears because they can be indicators of their next actions.  

If you see their ears pointed strait up, then they are relaxed and curious.  If you see their ears pinned down and back, this means they are either stressed or about to take action.  You can use this as a basic guideline to know when you are getting too close and also help you predict what they may do next.   

Never walk briskly and directly towards wild horses because they will most certainly run.  

You want to act uninterested and meander slowly and keep your eyes averted away from them because they will perceive you as less of a threat.  

Wild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim Layton The sooner you can sit down or get lower to the ground the better chance you will have for watching them for longer periods of time. I love to get down on my knees to photograph the wild horses anyway because it creates a very inanimate connection between the horse and the viewer.  

Herds that frequently see people are more likely to tolerate visitors. This can be a good thing or it can also be unfortunate, depending on the behavior of the visitor. 

Wild horses that are used to positive interactions with people can become quite bold and this can lead to bad and undesirable outcomes for wild horses. 

I have seen this first hand with yearlings.  They are incredibly curious and want to explore everything new.

I’ve had to literally almost jog away from yearlings because of their curiosity and lack of fear of me.

Don't be fooled, foals and yearlings can move much faster than you realize, so you need to always have an exit plan at all times.  

I will put a larger version of the photograph below this text so you can see it better and enjoy the simple and pure beauty of these majestic mares in their natural environment. 

Wild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim Layton

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

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KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

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Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) Broadfoot Herd Missouri Shannon County Wild Horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/the-broadfoot-herd-trio-in-fresh-winter-snow Sun, 31 Jan 2021 10:19:14 GMT
A Majestic Mare In The Fresh Winter Snow https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/majestic-mare-in-fresh-winter-snow Wild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim Layton I was very fortunate to find the Broadfoot herd today right after sunrise in the fresh winter snow. 

The mare that you see in this photograph today is pregnant and I think she is likely to foal in early March based on when she foaled last year.  

I was very lucky that I got to see her new foal last year, probably within a week or so of the birth. 

On that day, I didn't even realize the foal was laying on the ground near her taking a nap because of the distance from me and lack of movement.

As I got closer, I noticed something that was on the ground, but at first, I couldn't determine what it was.  I became more curious and stood still for a while and whatever it was never moved.  I moved closer and got out my binoculars and realized it was a new foal.  I started to become concerned because the foal was not moving and I couldn't determine it was breathing because I didn't see any movement of the chest. 

If you would like to continue following my latest analog photography, visit my new website where I am creating handmade platinum and palladium prints of wild horses across North America. 

I was fearful the new foal was a still born.  I waited another 10 minutes or so and the mare continued to eat and walk around her new foal and still no movement.  Then, all of the sudden the new little foal popped up, stretched, and found her mom to get a drink after an apparently long and restful nap. 

I was relieved and enjoyed watching the baby foal stay close to her mom and graze next to her. I was thankful the new foal was healthy and happy and my day instantly improved. 

Tim Layton - Wild Horses of Missouri Broadfoot HerdTim Layton - Wild Horses of Missouri Broadfoot Herd Today was a much different story. 

It was the first real snow of the winter and after several failed attempts to find the other herds, I was fortunate the find the Broadfoot herd.

The beautiful mare that you see in this photograph greeted me as I found the herd.

She knew, as well as the rest of the herd knew I was in their space long before I found them.

As I made my way through the fresh and untouched snow, it was an absolute delight to find the Broadfoot herd today.  The moment I saw them, I felt joy and a sense of peace rush over me like I was standing in a cool waterfall on a hot summers day.  

The cool and crisp air was so fresh that it was a pure delight to breathe it in and enjoy it.  It was good to be alive and part of something special.  Today was one of those special days when everything felt right and special and I knew I was part of something that was unique and never to be repeated.  It is days like this that we know we are alive and blessed beyond anything that could ever be expected.   

I will put a larger version of the photograph below this text so you can see it better and enjoy her majestic beauty. 

Wild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Shannon County, Missouri in Winter Snow by Tim Layton

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

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ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) Broadfoot Missouri Shannon County Wild Horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/majestic-mare-in-fresh-winter-snow Sat, 30 Jan 2021 13:09:42 GMT
SP-8x10 Daylight Processing Tray Initial Review by Tim Layton https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/sp-8x10-daylight-processing-tray-review SP-8x10 Daylight Processing Tray Initial Review by Tim LaytonSP-8x10 Daylight Processing Tray Initial Review by Tim Layton In this article today, I am sharing my initial review of the SP-8x10 Daylight Process Tray.  

I develop multiple sheets of large format film almost every week whether I am in my darkroom or on the road.  At the time of this article, I have developed over 40 sheets of 8x10 and 4x10 large format sheet film and 8 8x10 dry plates in the SP-8x10.  

The SP-8x10 can be used for any size large format sheet film or silver gelatin dry plates up to 8x10.  

Bottom line up front, I absolutely love the SP-8x10 and use it multiple times per week to develop my large format sheet film and dry plates. I highly recommend it to any large format photographer that is looking for a cost effective and trustworthy way to develop sheet film and silver gelatin dry plates. 

If you would like to continue following my latest analog photography, visit my new website where I am creating handmade platinum and palladium prints of wild horses across North America.

 

SP-8x10 Daylight Processing Tray Review by Tim LaytonSP-8x10 Daylight Processing Tray Review by Tim Layton I will share my initial thoughts with you in this article and after I develop more film, I will follow back up with another article to share a longer term review. 

I have always loved developing large format film and dry plates in trays versus rotary systems because the method is simple, effective, and proven. 

Until the SP-8x10 was available, there wasn't a large format daylight tray development option other than using standard darkroom trays which requires total darkness for the entire development process and a lot more chemicals.

I have been using Paterson Orbital Trays for several years now that were designed for developing RA-4 color prints because I needed a daylight method for developing large format sheet film and dry plates.  I simply have too much going on in my darkroom at any given time to be shut down in total darkroom for a single task.

For the average large format photographer, the need to develop a lot of film is infrequent at best and paying for an expensive rotary processing system like a Jobo, simply is out of the question. 

If you have a mass volume of sheets to develop at once and you can justify thousands of dollars for a rotary system, then this can be a good method as well.  It just isn't practical or cost effective for 99% of large format photographers and this is why the SP-8x10 is such a good option.  

The SP-8x10 is a versatile and cost effective solution for developing any size of sheet film or plates up to 8x10.  The system comes with dividers for the most common sized films to include 4x5, 4x10, 5x7, and 8x10.  Those formats will cover the vast majority of contemporary large format photographers. 

I use a variety of vintage cameras that use odd sizes compared to today's standard film sizes like 3 1/4 x 5 1/2 and 4 1/4 x 6 1/2 and others.  The SP-8x10 will be a good solution for developing these films and plates too. 

You will need a dark tent/bag or dark room to initially transfer the film to the SP-8x10 tray from your holders.  Since a large format photographer already has a solution to load their film holders, a method for transferring the film from the holders to the tray is already solved.

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

MY DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

8x10 Large Format Negative of Klepzig Mill by Tim Layton8x10 Large Format Negative of Klepzig Mill by Tim Layton I use all of my processing chemicals (water, developer, stop, fixer) at 20C/68F. 

I have a warmer bath to keep all the development chemicals at the right temperature.

Once I place the solution into the tray, I don't use any additional method for maintaining temperature.  I keep all of my solutions in the warming bath until about 15 seconds before I need them. 

I use 200ml of solution for every step in my process at 20C/68F which is a deviation from the recommended 500ml.  I have found that 200ml provided a perfect development and this uses considerably less chemicals. 

I start with a pre-wash for 2 minutes with distilled water. 

Then, I develop my film or plates for the proper times established by my formal testing process.  I also mix my developer with distilled water. 

I use a very simple and continuous agitation method by gently lifting the front of the tray up, sitting it back down and repeating that for the entire development time. This is a gentle and simple movement.  

I like to use TF-5 so I don't need a stop bath or hypo clear after fixing, so I go straight from development to fixing with TF-5.  This is a huge time savings for me. 

Then I do a one minute wash in the tray with regular tap water after the TF-5 before placing my film or plates in my archival film washer.  

I then place the washed film in a tray of distilled water with a few drops of Photo-Flo 200 for about one minute and then hang to dry.  

It literally could not be easier.

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS & TIPS

SP-8x10 Daylight Processing Tray Review by Tim LaytonSP-8x10 Daylight Processing Tray Review by Tim Layton When I received my first SP-8x10 tray I did glance at the directions to make sure I loaded the tabs in the top part of the tray in the right position.  I suggest you do the same, but pay attention to the directions.

I should have read the directions a little bit closer because I loaded one tab in the wrong direction and I put a small scratch on my first test film. 

To be clear, it was 100% my fault and I should have reviewed the directions more closely.  I share my mistake with you so you won't do the same thing.  

In the photo next to this text, I have the tabs installed for developing 8x10 film.  You only need the center tabs for developing 5x7 or 4x5 films.

SP-8x10 Processing Tray Review by Tim LaytonSP-8x10 Processing Tray Review by Tim Layton In the illustration to the left, the tabs are a little easier to see because of the colors. 

The directions suggest 500ml of chemistry and I did not find this to be the case.  I tested with 200ml vs. 500ml and all of my films developed absolutely perfect.  This is a huge savings in chemistry over time and makes the SP-8x10 an even better value in my opinion.

Based on my personal experience, I highly recommend the SP-8x10 for large format photographers because I know it works perfectly and will literally pay for itself with the savings in chemicals over time. 

I make very large silver gelatin prints and contact prints too, so if there were any issues with my negatives developed in the SP-8x10, it would be immediately recognized and obvious to me. 

SP-8x10 Processing Tray Review by Tim LaytonSP-8x10 Processing Tray Review by Tim Layton In the illustration to the left, you will see the center divider.  This is only needed for developing 4x5 film or 4x10 film. 

In the case of 4x5 film, you would also add the center tabs in the lid as shown in the illustration above.

For 4x10 film, you would not need the tabs in the lid.

Also, you will see the baffles at the front of the tray where you fill and empty your solutions.  The baffles are clearly marked and so you won't get them confused when installing them.

I have several of the SP-8x10 trays because I wash the tray after each use and then let it air dry with a fan blowing on it.  After it is dry, I reassemble it and place it on my shelf until it is ready for use next time. While the current tray is drying, I am developing more film in the new tray. 

I personally have 5 trays because I typically shoot 4 to 6 sheets of 8x10 film per outing and both Tim Jr and I developing film at the same time.  We are usually developing with two trays at the same time staggering the times by one minute. 

I am thankful that we have organizations like Stearman Press that continue to design and create new tools and solutions for analog photographers in our digital world. 

If you decide to get an SP-8x10, send me a note and let me know how it works out for you as well. 

-Tim Layton

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

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Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white film large format SP-8x10 https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/sp-8x10-daylight-processing-tray-review Fri, 22 Jan 2021 15:31:40 GMT
Ilford Just Announced New 5th Generation RC Portfolio Paper https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/ilford-just-announced-new-5th-generation-rc-portfolio-paper Ilford Just Announced New 5th Generation RC Portfolio Paper by Tim LaytonIlford Just Announced New 5th Generation RC Portfolio Paper by Tim Layton I am really excited to share the brand new announcement from Ilford today. 

They announced they are releasing a 5th generation version of the RC Portfolio paper.  This is a welcomed announcement to me because I really loved the 4th generation portfolio paper and this new generation is even better and more substantial.  

This paper is 81 years in the making.  Ilford released their first generation of multigrade paper in 1940. The 4th generation (MGIV) papers were released over 25 years ago, so this new 5th generation paper is a big deal.  The previous generation of portfolio papers were available in sizes from 4"x6" up to 16"x20".  I only wished they made it available in roll paper so I could make my large wild horse prints on this paper.

If you would like to continue following my latest analog photography, visit my new website where I am creating handmade platinum and palladium prints of wild horses across North America. 

Using everything they have learned over the last 81 years, I am confident this new RC paper is a paper that I can trust. Ilford used the latest technology in making their new RC emulsions and this new 5th generation paper was redesigned from the ground up. Ilford reported the re-design project was in development for 8 years.

Ilford reports the 5th generation papers to have a slightly warmer base tint than their predecessor as well as better, deeper blacks, improved mid-grade spacing for easier printing and more consistent contrast throughout the tonal range.  I have found that to be true in my own prints in the other versions of the 5th generation papers. 

There are two key parts of the announcement that really stood out to me. 

"What sets MULTIGRADE RC PORTFOLIO apart is its double-weight base. It combines the rigidity, weight, and premium quality feel of a fibre-based paper with the easy printing, quick and flat drying characteristics associated with all our RC papers.

This redesigned RC emulsion closely emulates the image tone and sensitometry performance of our MULTIGRADE Classic FB paper which makes alternating between RC and fibre easier than ever."

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

I honestly think this new 5th generation RC paper is a game changer.  Any of the old permanence concerns from the 1960's and 1970's from early versions of RC paper is completely resolved and a non issue in my opinion.  Depending on your archival goals, this new paper could be a great choice for you.  I personally guarantee my 5th generation Ilford RC prints for the lifetime of my art buyers/collectors.  I think any claims beyond this are probably marketing hype and who is really going to know when the current generation is dead anyway. 

Vanishing Grace Wild Horse Silver Gelatin Print by Tim LaytonVanishing Grace Wild Horse Silver Gelatin Print by Tim Layton In 2019, Ilford released the 5th generation RC silver gelatin papers in all the normal finishes and now in 2021, they released their new 5th generation portfolio RC heavyweight paper

In both cases, I have found an improvement over the previous 4th generation papers in separation of highlights and mid tones and increased richness in the blacks and shadows. I also believe the new generation paper provides even sharper images.

For the collectors that typically want fiber silver gelatin prints, I challenge your mindset and I believe the new 5th generation Ilford silver gelatin RC papers have completely dispelled any lingering concerns with RC paper permanence dating back to the 60's and 70's.

Simply put, I completely trust my best silver gelatin images on the new 5th generation Ilford RC paper and I guarantee my silver gelatin prints on these papers for a lifetime.

Additionally, I treat all of my silver gelatin prints with Sistan as described in my B&W Fine Art Collectors Guide.  I have complete confidence that my RC silver gelatin prints will last for at least an entire lifetime and probably much longer if handled and presented as I describe in my collectors guide.

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

ILFORD'S OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

"Despite the numerous challenges of 2020, we are delighted to share some exciting product news. We start 2021 with the launch of the brand new and improved ILFORD MULTIGRADE RC PORTFOLIO darkroom paper.

Utilising our 5th generation MULTIGRADE emulsion, this new formulation offers important advancements in product quality and performance that we are now pleased to introduce into our premium RC paper, MULTIGRADE RC PORTFOLIO.

These new papers have a slightly warmer base tint and image colour than their predecessor as well as better, deeper blacks, improved mid-grade spacing for easier printing and more consistent contrast throughout the tonal range.

What sets MULTIGRADE RC PORTFOLIO apart is its double-weight base. It combines the rigidity, weight, and premium quality feel of a fibre-based paper with the easy printing, quick and flat drying characteristics associated with all our RC papers.

This redesigned RC emulsion closely emulates the image tone and sensitometry performance of our MULTIGRADE Classic FB paper which makes alternating between RC and fibre easier than ever.

This product blends some of the best characteristics from both bases making it perfect for all printers – from students and beginners to experienced darkroom professionals wanting extra special, premium quality prints for clients, portfolios, or exhibitions.

*At launch this product will only be available in a Pearl surface finish. The 10x15cm (4x6”) size will no longer feature a postcard printed back product however, this is easy to replicate yourself  by copying the newly enclosed layout template." [see full announcement] Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

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Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white fine art Ilford photography RC https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/ilford-just-announced-new-5th-generation-rc-portfolio-paper Tue, 19 Jan 2021 19:12:54 GMT
Latest Round Of Updates To My LED UV Printer For Making Platinum Prints https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/latest-round-of-updates-to-my-led-uv-printer-for-making-platinum-prints Latest Round Of Updates To My LED UV Printer For Making Platinum Prints by Tim LaytonLatest Round Of Updates To My LED UV Printer For Making Platinum Prints by Tim Layton In a recent article, I shared some simple and practical updates that I made to the printer and to my workflow while making platinum prints. 

Last year, I shared an article where I upgraded the UV printer to new LED lights and in this article today, I have another big update to share. 

I have been been making a lot of wild horse platinum and platinum/palladium prints this last month and I decided to see if I could shorten my printing times from the already much improved 3 minute average from the previous 10 minute printing time.

Heavy Burden Platinum & Palladium Wild Horse Print by Tim LaytonHeavy Burden Platinum & Palladium Wild Horse Print by Tim Layton Wildheart - Handmade Wild Horse Platium Print by Tim LaytonWildheart - Handmade Wild Horse Platium Print by Tim Layton

If you would like to continue following my latest analog photography, visit my new website where I am creating handmade platinum and palladium prints of wild horses across North America. 

Once I started looking at the existing layout of the lights, I realized something that I did not originally plan. 

I decided to place the new bank of lights in between the existing lights to effectively double the volume and density of lights.  Since each bank of lights are wired in series, I now have two separate banks of lights.  

This means I have two choices that I never had before. 

First, I can double the volume of UV light by using both banks of lights.  

The two banks of lights together has shortened my exposure times from a 3 minute average to less than half at 1 minute and 15 seconds! Yes, you read that correctly.  My exposure times are between 1 minute and 1 minute 15 seconds. 

The Sentry - Platinum & Palladium Print Behind The Scenes With Tim LaytonThe Sentry - Platinum & Palladium Print Behind The Scenes With Tim Layton My latest platinum print "The Sentry" that you see to the left of this text was exposed for 1 minute 15 seconds and the delicate tonality and highlights are just beautiful.

If you know anything about UV exposure times for platinum and palladium, then you know how amazing that truly is. 

This isn't just about the shorter exposure time.  By having a shorter exposure time, the sensitizer retains more humidity and that should result in deeper and richer tonal values and I think an overall higher quality of print.  This is theory at this point, but I do expect to see these improvements and I will report back in the near future to let you know if this has materialized. 

Second, I can continue to print with the existing bank of lights for my 3 minute exposure times when desired, and have a failover second set of lights in the event that I ever have a failure. 

Free Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim LaytonFree Wild Horse Behind The Scenes Art Updates by Tim Layton

UPDATE TO LED LIGHTS

LED UV Platinum Printer Update by Tim LaytonLED UV Platinum Printer Update by Tim Layton LED UV Platinum Printer Update by Tim LaytonLED UV Platinum Printer Update by Tim Layton

As you can see in the photos above, my old lighting setup is on the left and my new setup is on the right.  I have effectively doubled my LED lights.  I simply installed the new lights in between the existing lights.  This only took about 30 minutes and I was up and running. 

Also, after making a lot more prints from the last update, I realized I needed one more very minor, but very important update.  I added a stopper screw to keep the horizontal 1x2 bar in place and not slide forward when I prop up the heavy glass when working with the paper and negatives. I added a stopper screw to both sides of the printer.  Now when I lay the heavy glass on the support bar, it won't shift forward and potentially cause a hazard. 

LED UV Platinum Printer Update by Tim LaytonLED UV Platinum Printer Update by Tim Layton

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Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) fine art gallery platinum pure platinum wild horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/latest-round-of-updates-to-my-led-uv-printer-for-making-platinum-prints Mon, 18 Jan 2021 01:52:00 GMT
How I Make Two 4x10 Pano Exposures With My 8x10 Large Format Camera https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/how-i-make-two-4x10-pano-exposures-with-my-8x10-large-format-camera How I Make 4x10 Pano Exposures With My 8x10 Large Format Camera by Tim LaytonHow I Make 4x10 Pano Exposures With My 8x10 Large Format Camera by Tim Layton In this article, I share a very simple, but highly effective method that I use to create TWO 4x10 panoramic exposures with my 8x10 Chamonix view camera

I also have a 4x10 reducing back for my 8x10 camera, but this method that I share with you today uses something you probably already own if you are shooting 8x10 and it is a lot cheaper than buying a reducing back.

My original idea for the method that I share with you in this article came because I had a cracked dark slide on one of my 8x10 film holders.

I realized if I cut the old dark slide roughly in half, that I could get two 4x10 exposures on a single sheet of film which has a lot of advantages.  

First, everything I do is optimized around 8x10 from film development to enlargements.  Being able to use standard 8x10 film versus having to wait once a year to purchase custom 4x10 film from Ilford, not only makes a lot of sense, but it also opens up film choices to any type of 8x10 film.

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton
There are a couple of key points that I want to share to help you in case you want to give this method a try. 

4x10 Large Format Modification to 8x10 Holders by Tim Layton4x10 Large Format Modification to 8x10 Holders by Tim Layton First, if you look at my dark slide, you will see that I left the top part that fits in the light trap. 

I simply left my dark slide mounted in the holder and used a gray sharpie to draw a line right down the middle.  Then, I used a new razor blade knife and a ruler to make the cuts.  That's all there was to cutting the dark slide.  

The next thing that I did was to create a simple mask that I place on my ground glass to help with composition in the field.  You can approximate the composition without any type of mask, but it makes it easier if you use the mask because you can visualize the composition without distraction.

In the next section, I share my field procedure with you to remove all mystery from the process. 

FIELD PROCEDURE

Two 4x10 Panoramic Exposures on a single Sheet of 8x10 Film by Tim LaytonTwo 4x10 Panoramic Exposures on a single Sheet of 8x10 Film by Tim Layton I like to work in the clockwise direction, so I start by placing the ground glass in a position where I load the film from the left side and set my composition on the bottom half of the ground glass. 

A key point to remember is that you need to leave the full size dark slide in position until you are ready to make the exposure.  Then, you pull out the full dark slide and slide in the modified slide so the bottom half of the film will receive the exposure. 

Then slide in the full dark slide after your exposure to protect your film. 

Next, rotate the back clockwise so the film holder will load from the right side. 

Then, once you are ready to make your second exposure, remove the full dark slide again and replace with the half slide so the bottom half of your film will be exposed.  

Then just place your full slide back into position and store the holder for development later. 

It really could not be any easier than this and you get the advantage of using standard 8x10 sheet film and no need for expensive reducing back or speciality film holders. Spend you money on trips or additional gear that you really need.

8x10 Large Format at Klepzig Mill with Tim Layton8x10 Large Format at Klepzig Mill with Tim Layton 8x10 Large Format at Klepzig Mill with Tim Layton8x10 Large Format at Klepzig Mill with Tim Layton 8x10 Large Format at Klepzig Mill with Tim Layton8x10 Large Format at Klepzig Mill with Tim Layton  

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton

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KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

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Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/how-i-make-two-4x10-pano-exposures-with-my-8x10-large-format-camera Sat, 09 Jan 2021 12:00:00 GMT
My Latest Updates To My LED UV Printer For Making Platinum Prints https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/updates-to-my-led-uv-printer-for-making-platinum-prints Updates To My LED UV Printer For Making Platinum Prints by Tim LaytonUpdates To My LED UV Printer For Making Platinum Prints by Tim Layton In this article today, I am sharing a couple of simple, but highly effective updates that I just completed for my LED UV Printer. 

In a detailed article last year, I shared how I updated my BLB Fluorescent bulb setup to using new LED Black Lights.  If you haven't read that article, you will want to check that out first and then come back to this new article.

Like anything in life, the more you do something, the more refinements that you figure out over time.  

I printed a lot of platinum and platinum/palladium prints last year and with my newest Great Smoky Mountains Historic Buildings Platinum Print Project, I am going to be printing even more platinum prints.

One of the smartest things that I did last year was to stop using my contact printing frames when making platinum prints. 

I got some custom cut heavy 3/8" glass to place in the bottom of my UV printer.  This means that I no longer have to fight with the contact printing frame and try and line up the negative and sensitized area on the paper.  I can now work from the top, looking down, which makes everything easier and more accurate.  

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton

Watch the updates that I discuss in this article in action. 

UV Printer Updates by Tim LaytonUV Printer Updates by Tim Layton The downside to that decision was figuring out a way to get the top of the printer and the glass out of the way while I am laying down the sensitized paper and negative on top.

I did two things to address this challenge. 

First, I got a piece of rope and created a pulley system to lift and secure the top of the print up and out of the way while placing the paper and negative into the UV Printer. 

As you can see from the photo on the left, I anchored the rope to the back PVC tube and then looped the rope through the handle on the front of the door, and then ran the rope up to the front PVC tube and used a slip knot to secure the top of the UV printer up and out of the way.  The PVC tubes are part of my large print drying screen system.

If you look closely, you can see the heavy 3/8" pieces of glass in the base of the UV printer.  I needed way to get the top piece of glass up and out of the way to allow me to place my sensitized paper and negative before sandwiching them together with the heavy top sheet of glass. 

I cut a piece of 1x2 pine that extends two inches over each side of the printer and this board acts as a solid brace to hold up the heavy sheet of glass while I am working to place the sensitized paper and negative for exposure.

These simple updates don't seen like a big deal, but I can assure you, these updates make my workflow so much easier, effective, and efficient.

If you enjoy platinum and platinum/palladium printing, then you will want to follow my Free Analog Photography Journal so you want miss my latest platinum printing updates. 

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton

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TRAINING FOR ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHERS

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

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ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white fine art large format LED Platinum Platinum Prints UV Printer https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/updates-to-my-led-uv-printer-for-making-platinum-prints Thu, 07 Jan 2021 00:45:00 GMT
Cooke Series II Variable Soft Focus Lens First Landscape Print https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/cooke-series-ii-variable-soft-focus-lens-first-landscape-print Cooke Series II Vintage Soft Focus Lens at Klepzig Mill by Tim LaytonCooke Series II Vintage Soft Focus Lens at Klepzig Mill by Tim Layton In this article today, I continue my exploration of the Cooke Series II variable soft focus lens by heading out in the field and photographing a landscape.

I am working on a larger scale large format vintage lens project, where I am using my current collection of vintage lenses to make large format contact prints.  The goal is to share the optical characteristics and qualities of these beautiful lenses in a realistic and informative manner.

I am using my Chamonix 8x10 view camera along with a Sinar Copal Shutter and an adjustable Iris lens board so I can have an shutter for these barrel lenses and easily mount them without needing to make an individual lens board.  You can learn more about all of this on my Large Format Vintage Lens Project page.

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton The Taylor, Taylor & Hobson company of Leicester, England and later of New York, began their production of soft-focus lenses about 1898. The first model was the Cooke Series II which was first sold about 1898 and this is the lens that I own.

Based on the fact that the Series IIA lens was introduced in 1910, I know my lens was most likely made between 1898 and 1910 making it over 100 years old at a minimum.

One of the things that I love most about this lens is that I can get two different looks from this one lens. 

I can create the vintage soft focus Pictorialist style image or a very sharp image, however, the sharpness and contrast is different than you will find in modern day contemporary lenses. 

Cooke Series II Variable Soft Focus Lens 8x10 Large Format Photography by Tim LaytonCooke Series II Variable Soft Focus Lens 8x10 Large Format Photography by Tim Layton For this first still life studio print, I shot the lens wide open at F4.5 and applied the maximum soft focus effect and for the second print, I stopped the lens down to F16 to see how sharp it would become.  

For this third print, I headed out to the historic Klepzig Mill on a cold winter morning because I thought this scene embodies the Victorian era and would make for a great subject. 

I also elected to go to Klepzig Mill because it is a typical scene that I find in the Great Smoky Mountains.  I am actively working on my Great Smoky Mountains Historic Buildings Project where I am photographing the last remaining historic cabins, mills, barns, and related buildings so I can make archival platinum prints.  I have been photographing these historic buildings over the last several years trying to get a feel for the gear that I want to use.  I am almost certain that I will be using the Cooke Series II as my main lens for the project and that is why I am testing it at Klepzig mill.  For the Great Smoky Mountains Historic Buildings Project, I am using Ilford FP4 because of the quality of this film along with my ability to create higher contrast negatives that are needed for making my platinum prints

Cooke Series II @ F5.6 - Klepzig Mill by Tim LaytonCooke Series II @ F5.6 - Klepzig Mill by Tim Layton

As you can see in the print above, this image doesn't look like the typical super sharp image that is possible with more modern large format lenses.  

I exposed this third image at F5.6 to see how much different and sharper it would appear from my first studio still life image at F4.5 (wide open). 

Cooke Series II Variable Soft Focus Lens 8x10 Large Format Photography by Tim LaytonCooke Series II Variable Soft Focus Lens 8x10 Large Format Photography by Tim Layton For this scene at Klepzig Mill, I purposely focused on the mill and did not apply any movements to try and get everything sharp from foreground to background.  I wanted to see how this lens performed like this and then later, come back and apply a front tilt movement.  

In this print, you can see the rocks in the foreground are soft and there was some vignetting in the upper left and right corners because I pushed the lens beyond its coverage area.  I actually kind of like the natural vignetting and I will consider using that again for select images in the future.  

For my next test, I plan to come back and expose a sheet of film wide open and apply a front tilt.  I think this may work out very nicely based on what I have learned so far about this lens. 

As you can see in my first contact print below at F4.5, it is dreamy sharp in the center area on the lens of the vintage camera and then it gets deliciously softer from there.  I have to tell you that this simple snapshot of this print is not representative of what the print looks like when you are holding it in your hands.  Something is lost in the transformation to a digital image.  I actually got emotional when I first saw this print after I turned on the white lights.  It literally grabbed my soul and spoke to me.  

Cooke Series II @ F4.5 Contact Print by Tim LaytonCooke Series II @ F4.5 Contact Print by Tim Layton

I am making 8x10 large format contact prints from the original film negatives without any dodging or burning because I want you to see what this lens can really produce.  In the image above, you can see the film notches and edges of the film in the contact prints, so you know for sure these prints are made from the original film negatives. 

While I am exploring this lens, I am trying to keep my costs down.  I am currently using Arista EDU Ultra 100 (Fomapan 100) and developing the negatives in my hand mixed version of D23.  You can get this formula from my B&W Formulas page. 

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton

In the second print that I made with this lens, you can see how much sharper this lens can be at F16.  Having the flexibility to create an ethereal soft focus image or dial in a beautifully sharp image using the same lens is something that is unparalleled with modern lenses today.  

Cooke Series II at F16 by Tim LaytonCooke Series II at F16 by Tim Layton

The design and engineering of the Cooke Series II is still a marvel in the 21st century in my opinion.  As photographer's we are able to control the amount of diffusion with this lens and at any setting it is applied evenly edge to edge. 

I find the sharpness of this lens to be more like what the human eye resolves which is a natural rendering of a scene versus the clinical and possibly over-sharpened style of contemporary lenses.  Some modern lenses are so sharp that it starts to border on too sharp, depending on the key subject. 

Cooke Series II Maximum SharpnessCooke Series II Maximum Sharpness If you refer to the 1898 advertisement to the left, notice by unscrewing the back lens exactly 3 turns, the maximum definition is obtained!

The Cooke Series II lens utilized the same diffusion principal as the Dallmeyer Patent Portrait lens, that is, by moving a lens element in relation to the other elements to add varying degrees of spherical aberrations to the lens.

I feel like the unscrewing three turns method is like a secret the designers created and unless you are knowledgable about the lens, you would never know that was possible. 

I have the lens mounted on a Sinar type lensboard which I frequently use on my Chamonix 8x10 View Camera and a Sinar Copal Shutter.  This shutter allows me to use faster speed sheet films with my vintage barrel lenses, and even for longer exposures, the shutter eliminates the need for me to use my lens cap as the shutter.

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton

ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY LAUNCHPAD

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TRAINING FOR ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHERS

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

Buy Your Photography, Video, & Technology Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

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Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white Cooke Cooke Series II large format Silver Gelatin vintage https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2021/1/cooke-series-ii-variable-soft-focus-lens-first-landscape-print Sun, 03 Jan 2021 15:20:14 GMT
Cooke Series II F4.5 Variable Soft Focus Lens First Print https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/12/cooke-series-ii-f4-5-variable-soft-focus-lens-first-print Cooke Series II F4.5 Variable Soft Focus Lens First Print by Tim LaytonCooke Series II F4.5 Variable Soft Focus Lens First Print by Tim Layton The Taylor, Taylor & Hobson company of Leicester, England and later of New York, began their production of soft-focus lenses about 1898.

The first model was the Cooke Series II which was first sold about 1898 and this is the lens that I own.  

You can learn more about this lens on my Cooke Series II page where I share the history, background, and additional details about this lens.

Based on the fact that the Series IIA lens was introduced in 1910, I know my lens was most likely made between 1898 and 1910 making it over 100 years old at a minimum.

Cooke Series II F4.5 Soft Focus 13 Inch Large Format Vintage Lens by Tim LaytonCooke Series II F4.5 Soft Focus 13 Inch Large Format Vintage Lens by Tim Layton One of the things that I love most about this lens is that I can get two different looks from this one lens. 

I can create the vintage soft focus Pictorialist style image or a very sharp image, however, the sharpness and contrast is different than you will find in modern day contemporary lenses. 

For this first print, I shot the lens wide open at F4.5 and applied the maximum soft focus effect.

I wanted to see how it would perform wide open and I was really impressed. 

The design and engineering of the Cooke Series II is still a marvel in the 21st century in my opinion.  As photographer's we are able to control the amount of diffusion with this lens and at any setting it is applied evenly edge to edge. 

I find the sharpness of this lens to be more like what the human eye resolves which is a natural rendering of a scene versus the clinical and possibly over-sharpened style of contemporary lenses.  Some modern lenses are so sharp that it starts to border on too sharp, depending on the key subject. 

Cooke Series II Maximum SharpnessCooke Series II Maximum Sharpness If you refer to the 1898 advertisement to the left, notice by unscrewing the back lens exactly 3 turns, the maximum definition is obtained!

For this first print, I unscrewed the rear element three times and also applied the maximum soft focus effect by fully rotating the front element in the clockwise direction. 

The Cooke Series II lens utilized the same diffusion principal as the Dallmeyer Patent Portrait lens, that is, by moving a lens element in relation to the other elements to add varying degrees of spherical aberrations to the lens.

I feel like the unscrewing three turns method is like a secret the designers created and unless you are knowledgable about the lens, you would never know that was possible. 

I have the lens mounted on a Sinar type lensboard which I frequently use on my Chamonix 8x10 View Camera and a Sinar Copal Shutter.  This shutter allows me to use faster speed sheet films with my vintage barrel lenses, and even for longer exposures, the shutter eliminates the need for me to use my lens cap as the shutter. 

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton

8x10 Large Format Contact Print

Cooke Series II @ F4.5 Contact Print by Tim LaytonCooke Series II @ F4.5 Contact Print by Tim Layton

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton I used my Chamonix 8x10 large format view camera loaded with Arista EDU Ultra 100 B&W film. 

I wanted to try this film to see what I thought about it.  I thought since I have about 40 or more lenses to test on my Vintage Large Format Lens Project, it would give me a very good sense of this film and how it performs. 

I used a Sinar Copal Shutter mounted behind my front standard on the 8x10 Chamonix camera to allow me to use this vintage barrel lens that has no shutter. 

Using modern panchromatic sheet film at EI 100 wasn't in the plan in the late 19th century. 

For this first print, I wanted to expose the image wide open at F4.5 and dial in the maximum amount of soft focus effect. 

I focused on the lens of the 5x7 vintage camera in the scene to ensure the center of the image was sharp.  When you see the print in person, you can read the very fine writing on the lens that is located right above the center element.

If you look close, the brass plate below the lens is completely out of focus as is the bottom half of the plate holders and the brass lens to the left of the camera. 

Cooke Series II Variable Soft Focus Lens by Tim LaytonCooke Series II Variable Soft Focus Lens by Tim Layton   Arista.EDU Ultra 100 Negative With Cooke Series II F4.5 Variable Soft Focus Lens by Tim LaytonArista.EDU Ultra 100 Negative With Cooke Series II F4.5 Variable Soft Focus Lens by Tim Layton

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Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white film fine art large format Vintage https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/12/cooke-series-ii-f4-5-variable-soft-focus-lens-first-print Mon, 21 Dec 2020 21:11:52 GMT
I Not Only Think Big - I Do Big, My New Journey Starting in 2021 https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/12/i-not-only-think-big-i-do-big I Not Only Think Big - I Do Big, My New Journey Starting in 2021 by Tim LaytonI Not Only Think Big - I Do Big, My New Journey Starting in 2021 by Tim Layton As a large and ultra large format photographer, I think big and I do big. 

What do I really mean by that?

I started in large format photography using a 4x5 large format field camera during a time when there was no Internet or social media.  When I started in photography, if you wanted to learn something, you needed to read an actual book or connect with an experienced photographer and have them help you. 

After I dabbled in the darkroom using roll film for a few years as a young boy, I was introduced to the work of Ansel Adams.  It wasn't that Ansel used large format that moved me so deeply, it was his work and later the realization that he used large format motivated me to move in that direction.  I thought to myself, if I ever want to be able to create prints like Ansel, then I need to learn large format.  Many years after using large format and by all rights, an accomplished photographer, I discovered the work of Clyde Butcher.  His large scale silver gelatin prints moved me deeply.  I felt another surge of inspiration like I had earlier with Ansel and I continued to move forward. 

Coming from 35mm and 120 roll film cameras, I remember how big my first 4x5 film camera seemed to me.  Now, I view a 4x5 camera in the same way I viewed those small roll film cameras, small and oftentimes tiny.  Perspective is a funny thing I suppose. 

In this article, I share my thoughts about why I use large and ultra large format view cameras along with handmade emulsions and how this is going to help me realize my latest creative vision. 

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton In 2015, I wrote a detailed article sharing many of the technical and underlying reasons why I use large format view cameras in modern digital times. This article isn't a repeat of that article from 2015. 

For the vast majority of my career, I have been using large format cameras, commercial film, and manufacturer created paper to make my fine art prints. 

I have created everything from a wide variety of contact prints to very large scale silver gelatin enlargements. 

As my primary negative medium, I have been using films like Ilford HP5 and Kodak Tri-X in my large format cameras ranging from 4x5 to 11x14 and a wide variety of commercially produced silver gelatin and platinum papers.

Tim Layton With Silver Gelatin Large Format PrintTim Layton With Silver Gelatin Large Format Print For the last two decades, I have been focused on creating a body of work.  Using commercial film and paper was simply what most analog photographers use and it certainly made sense for me during this period.  

While I learned and taught workshops on a variety of historic processes, I never used them in my portfolio work.  All of that is about to change in 2021. 

In the summer of 2020, I made a bold decision to stop creating and put on the breaks so I could reflect and think about the future.  

After months of hiking, travel, and thinking, I realized that I wanted to slow things down even more than the already slow process of working with film and making prints by hand in the darkroom.  Even though by contemporary standards, I produced a low volume of work, I feel that it is still too much.  

I have a deep desire to create less and work even slower so that I can create more impactful and meaning work that is fueled by emotion and is stood up by a greater purpose. 

I don't actually know the full vision at this point because it can only be realized by taking one step at a time.  The steps right now are leading me to make my own custom handmade silver gelatin negative emulsions so I can pour 8x10 and 11x14 dry plate glass negatives.  

DIY Handmade Dry Plate Analog Photography by Tim LaytonDIY Handmade Dry Plate Analog Photography by Tim Layton The process of making the emulsions from raw materials, cutting and preparing the glass, and pouring the plates by hand spans the course of many days in order to just have a negative medium suitable for exposure and development.  This is in stark contrast to loading a sheet of commercial film taking only a few seconds.

But it isn't just about the ultra slow and contemplative workflow, it is about using a medium that helps me realize the vision that I have in my minds eye. 

Being able to control the spectral sensitivity of the emulsion along with direct control over my developing formula, I have a new level of control that wasn't available to me when using commercial panchromatic films and developers. 

But it doesn't stop here.  I don't plan on using my typical lenses that are known for their incredible detail, resolution, and contrast. I will be exploring a variety of vintage lenses that will help me fully realize my vision.

If you like this article, join thousands of other photographers around the world and subscribe to our Free Analog Photography Journal.  Tim Jr and I work hard to bring you interesting and helpful original content for analog photographers that you won't see anywhere else.  All of the tips, articles, tutorials, and videos that we create are made right in our darkroom that we personally built.

At this point, I honestly don't know the combination of mediums, methods, and gear that I want to use for my latest work and portfolio, but I am going to push forward and see where the path takes me. 

Tim Layton Holding "New Life" Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Silver Gelatin PrintTim Layton Holding "New Life" Wild Horses of Missouri B&W Silver Gelatin Print If you have been following me in the last few years, then you already know that I have been following and photographing wild horses. 

These majestic symbols of American freedom have completely captured my creative spirit and soul.  No subject in my entire career has ever moved me so deeply.

I have a problem.  I want to ultimately create handmade fine art of the wild horses using large and ultra large format dry plates and vintage lenses, but on a technical level, it is effectively impossible to capture wild horses using this medium and gear.  

I am evaluating my options, and I think one path that I will explore is to continue capturing on 35mm roll film because I need the mobility, speed, and agility that 35mm and long glass affords me. 

Then I can make enlarged negatives onto the large and ultra large format dry plates using a two step process where I make an enlarged interpositive from the 35mm roll film onto Ortho film the same size as the final dry plate.  I can contact print the ortho film to make the new dry plate negative so I can make contact prints on my handmade paper.  This means I will be making my own contact printing paper using an emulsion that I design and ultimately hand coat on my paper of choice.  

All of this is a step in the right direction and will help me explore my vision, but there is one important piece missing.  Based on my vision, I feel that I want to use vintage glass to create more of an ethereal and emotional image.  The ultra sharp and detailed images that I capture with my Nikon F6 and modern glass doesn't represent what I feel or see in my mind when I think about the wild horses. 

One way that I can explore this vision is to use my large and ultra large format cameras loaded with my handmade dry plates and vintage glass to create a copy negative from an interpositive.  By using my 8x10 or 11x14 camera and vintage glass to create the copy negative, I may be able to achieve the feeling and emotion that I am pursuing.

I won't know the answer to these questions until I get into the process and explore my options.  All I know at this point is that I will need to capture the original image using 35mm film because of the speed and agility of the wild horses and I need to somehow transform that image into something that aligns with my vision.  

I promised at the top of the article that I would share why I continue to use large and ultra large format cameras.  Once I saw a large format contact print, something magical happened inside of me.  I have contact printed for over three decades now and I still feel that same sense of awe as I did in the beginning.  As someone that has made very large prints, I could never fully shake that emotional connection and sense of awe that I had with large format contact prints.  When I moved from making 4x5 to 5x7 and 8x10 contact prints, it felt like another level was unlocked.  When I eventually made my first 11x14 contact print and mounted it in a 20x24 mat and frame, my world changed. 

In my mind, I didn't think that 11x14 was that much bigger than 8x10, but when I saw and felt the difference, everything changed.  I have been exploring the possibility of getting a 14x17 camera, but I haven't made that decision just yet, so I continue to use my 11x14 for now.  

The presence and overall feeling of the 11x14 contact print mounted on 17x24 or 20x24 versus an 8x10 mounted on 11x14 can only be understood by experiencing it in person with images that have meaning to you.

I am deeply excited about the future, and I am equally thrilled that I am sharing how to create silver gelatin emulsions from raw materials so you can make your own paper, glass, and film negatives and printing paper.  I cover all of this in my new DIY Handmade Series.  

If you like the information in this article, then you will love being part of our new Analog Photography Community where Tim Jr and I share exclusive member-only details such as my personal notes and specific details about the content in this article.

 


NEW ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY COMMUNITY

Tim Layton Fine Art Analog Photography Patreon CommunityTim Layton Fine Art Analog Photography Patreon Community

If you like the information in this article, then you will love being part of my new Analog Photography Community where we share additional member only details in addition to creating exclusive video tutorials, and detailed articles every week to help analog photographers take their creative vision and technical skills to a higher level.


ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY LAUNCHPAD

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Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white darkroom Emulsion fine art Silver Gelatin Wild Horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/12/i-not-only-think-big-i-do-big Fri, 18 Dec 2020 11:48:51 GMT
Ansco 30 X-RAY Film Development Formula https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/12/ansco-30-x-ray-film-development-formula Ansco 30 X-RAY Film Development Formula by Tim LaytonAnsco 30 X-RAY Film Development Formula by Tim Layton The Anso 30 is a B&W X-RAY film developer was originally created for Ansco X-RAY film, Ansco Direct Copy film, and Direct Duplicating film, however, based on the elements in this formula, it also works great with modern x-ray film too. 

One of the things that quickly becomes evident when using X-ray film is the management of excessive contrast and this vintage formula will definitely help you do that along with other techniques such as pre-flashing. 

This developer has a long shelf life and so it makes it very reasonable and cost-effective to use for occasional or low volume users. 

Enjoy this formula and make sure you join my Free Analog Photography Journal so you will be updated when I add new formulas and send out my latest updates.


Ansco 30 X-RAY Film Development Formula

Formula to prepare 1 liter of the stock developer

Distilled Water at 125F/52C 750ml

Metol 3.5g

Sodium Sulfite, Anhydrous 60g

Hydroquinone 9g

Sodium Carbonate, monohydrated 40g

Potassium Bromide 2g

Add cold water to make 1 liter

Note: Dissolve in the order given in the formula above.  Do not dilute for use.

If you like the information in this article, then you will love being part of our new Analog Photography Community where Tim Jr and I share exclusive member-only details such as my personal notes and specific details about the content in this article.


NEW ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY COMMUNITY Tim Layton Fine Art Analog Photography Patreon CommunityTim Layton Fine Art Analog Photography Patreon Community

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Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography Ansco black and white darkroom Formula Recipe x-ray film https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/12/ansco-30-x-ray-film-development-formula Mon, 14 Dec 2020 15:10:22 GMT
Kodak D-76H Eco-Friendly B&W Film Developer Formula https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/12/kodak-d-76h-eco-friendly-b-w-film-developer-formula Kodak D-76H Eco-Friendly B&W Film Developer Formula by Tim LaytonKodak D-76H Eco-Friendly B&W Film Developer Formula by Tim Layton D-76H is a modified version of the classic D-76 formula.  It is my understanding that Dr. Haist was looking for a way to counteract the increase in pH levels as D-76 aged and he discovered by removing hydroquinone it gave him the results he was looking for.

I have personally let a commercial bottle of D-76 age for over a year and I didn't see any increase in pH levels.  Since we really don't know the exact makeup of commercially produced formulas, the modern day version may be different than the formula Dr. Haist modified several decades ago. 

A really good side effect of eliminating hydroquinone from the developer, is the lowering of toxicity levels and that is always a good thing in my book. Hydroquinone is a known carcinogenic (known to cause cancer).  While the eco-friendly side of the equation wasn't probably in the original motivations for modifying the D-76 formula, I will take the improvement and feel better about using this incredible developer. Effectively there is no downside to using D-76H.  By mixing the formula yourself, you not only know exactly what ingredients are used, but your bank account will be happy too.  

D76-H can be used as a stock solution or 1:1. I personally use it as a one-shot developer diluted at 1+1 because I believe I get even better shadow detail.

To establish the correct development time for your black and white film, you really should properly test your film to identity the true film speed (EI) and then validate (N) normal, (N+) expanded, and (N-) contracted development times.

You may want to also check out my B&W Analog Photography Formulas page where I have a bunch of additional formulas for everything from film and paper developers to stop baths and fixer formulas too. 

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton If you are a roll film user or you don’t need accurate or repeatable results with your films, use the Massive Dev Chart development times for D-76 as a good starting place.

Since D-76 is the standard for all black and white film developers, the technical information sheet for your specific film will most likely include a suggested development time for D-76 as a place to get you started if you don't want or need to develop your negatives with a high degree of accuracy. 

A good strategy if you don't want to test your film is to rate your roll film at two-thirds or one-half box speed and develop for 10% less than the suggested time.

I have tested HP5+ in D-76H using my Jobo CPP-3 processor and determined EI rating to be 200 with a N (normal) development time of 7 minutes.

If you like the information in this article, then you will love being part of my new Analog Photography Community where we share additional member only details in addition to creating exclusive video tutorials, and detailed articles every week to help analog photographers take their creative vision and technical skills to a higher level. 

D-76H Film Development Formula

Formula to prepare 1 liter of the stock developer

Distilled Water @ 125F/52C 500ml

Metol - 2.5g
Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous) - 100g
Borax (decahydrate) - 2g
Distilled water (chilled) to make 1 liter

If you like the information in this article, then you will love being part of my new Analog Photography Community where we share additional member only details in addition to creating exclusive video tutorials, and detailed articles every week to help analog photographers take their creative vision and technical skills to a higher level. 

Mixing Instructions

  • Heat 500ml of distilled water to 52C/125F in a clean 1000ml+ graduate
  • Dissolve 2.5g Metol in a separate and clean graduate with distilled water and then add to main 1000ml beaker
  • Dissolve 100g Sodium Sulfite in a separate and clean graduate with distilled water and then add to main 1000ml beaker
  • Dissolve 2g Borax in a clean and separate graduate using distilled water and then add to the main 1000ml beaker
  • Add chilled distilled water to the main 1000ml beaker to make 1000ml at 20C

Tip: I keep a one gallon jug of distilled water in the darkroom refrigerator at all times for this purpose.

If you like the information in this article, then you will love being part of our new Analog Photography Community where Tim Jr and I share exclusive member-only details such as my personal notes and specific details about the content in this article.

 


NEW ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY COMMUNITY

Tim Layton Fine Art Analog Photography Patreon CommunityTim Layton Fine Art Analog Photography Patreon Community

If you like the information in this article, then you will love being part of my new Analog Photography Community where we share additional member only details in addition to creating exclusive video tutorials, and detailed articles every week to help analog photographers take their creative vision and technical skills to a higher level.


ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY LAUNCHPAD

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton The Darkroom Underground Facebook Group by Tim LaytonThe Darkroom Underground Facebook Group by Tim Layton DIY Analog Photography Group by Tim LaytonDIY Analog Photography Group by Tim Layton Analog Photography YouTube Channel by Tim LaytonAnalog Photography YouTube Channel by Tim Layton Tim Layton Photography Facebook Fan PageTim Layton Photography Facebook Fan Page The Tim Layton Fine Art Facebook Fan PageThe Tim Layton Fine Art Facebook Fan Page


TRAINING FOR ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHERS

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

Buy Your Photography, Video, & Technology Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

B&H Photo VideoB&H Photo Video COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white black and white photography d-76 darkroom kodak https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/12/kodak-d-76h-eco-friendly-b-w-film-developer-formula Sun, 13 Dec 2020 12:00:42 GMT
New Analog Photography Community in 2021 With Tim Layton https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/12/new-analog-photography-community-in-2021-with-tim-layton New Analog Photography Community With Tim Layton in 2021New Analog Photography Community With Tim Layton in 2021 I am super excited to announce that Tim Jr. and I have created a brand new analog photography community starting January 1, 2021. 

After years of developing analog photography training courses, video workshops, and guidebooks, I wanted to do something different moving forward. 

My original retirement plans to travel and explore the American landscape and photograph wild horses didn't pan out as originally expected because of the global pandemic.  So, we are moving forward with this brand new community and I have to say that I am really happy about the future. 

We learned a lot from creating courses and workshops for several years.  We are taking all of that experience and the global analog photography community feedback and applying it to the new community.

This brand new analog photography community is interactive, fun, and most importantly, helps you learn a wide variety of analog photography methods, techniques, and processes in the shortest amount of time.

We have a good starting plan for 2021 and then after we get into it, I am sure we will take all the feedback and input and continue to evolve the path moving forward. 

You can read the full details of the 2021 plan, however, the short version is that we will be starting with showing you how to create homemade silver gelatin emulsions for making paper negatives, dry plates, film, and even your own paper!  By the end of 2021, you will have all of the knowledge to create your own emulsions from scratch to make negatives on paper, film, and glass plates and make your own paper for both contact printing and enlarging.  Think about the creative possibilities within your own photography and we can't wait to help you learn these new skills and then watch you thrive and create new artwork.

I couldn't be more excited about 2021 and I look forward to sharing all of this and getting to know you better.  


WHAT WILL YOU LEARN IN 2021?

Learn How To Make Handmade Silver Gelatin Emulsions

Learn How To Make Handmade Negatives (Paper, Dry Plates, Film)

Learn How To Make Handmade Paper For Contact Printing & Enlargements

Learn a Complete Handmade Silver Gelatin Workflow From Beginning To End

JOIN THE COMMUNITY NOW


Tim Layton Silver Gelatin Fine Art PrintTim Layton Silver Gelatin Fine Art Print In the new and exciting DIY Handmade Analog Photography series, I simplify the complexities of making handmade silver gelatin emulsions and making your own negatives (paper, dry plate, film) and printing paper (contact, enlarging).  There is nothing more satisfying than creating your artwork from raw materials.

By being a member of the Analog Photography Community, you get immediate access to each of the lessons, videos, and guides as we create them versus having to wait for the entire course to be developed.

Even if you use digital photography on a daily basis, the joy you get from making your photographs from raw materials is unparalleled in my mind.  I love the imperfect nature of handmade artwork, and I know a lot of other people do too.  In a digital society that seems so sterile and impersonal, there is no better way to stand out than to do something bold like making your artwork by hand. 

Making handmade art isn't just available to other artists like painters.  As photographers we have an incredible amount of control and influence over our final artwork and I walk you though everything you need to know in order to have a complete workflow.

DIY ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY HANDMADE SERIES

DIY Analog Photography Community with Tim LaytonDIY Analog Photography Community with Tim Layton In 2021, I break down the leaning process in a way that goes from easiest to the most complex to ensure that you build the skills and knowledge to be successful.

Since I demonstrate every step of the process in video for you, there is nothing left to the imagination because I demystify every step of the process for you.

In each of the individual courses, not only do you learn how to make the handmade silver gelatin emulsions, but you learn all of the tips and tricks to get great results too.  I go into a lot of detail on how to expose and process the materials to get optimum results with both handmade formulas as well as a few commercial formulas too. 

It is going to be an exciting year in 2021, so join me and Tim Jr in the Analog Photography Community and follow along with us this year and get immediate access to each of the lessons, videos, and guides as we create them versus having to wait for the entire course to be developed.


MEMBER BENEFITS

Unlimited access to everything in the community

Access to our new training courses before they are released

Ability to ask Tim questions and be part of live video meetings

Behind the scenes access as we create brand new artwork for collectors

25% discount on everything in Tim's analog photography training library

A free entry every month to win an artist original fine art print by Tim Layton

JOIN THE COMMUNITY NOW


ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY COMMUNITY

Tim Layton Fine Art Analog Photography Patreon CommunityTim Layton Fine Art Analog Photography Patreon Community

If you like the information in this article, then you will love being part of a new Analog Photography Community where Tim Jr and I create new videos and detailed articles every week to help analog photographers take their creative vision and technical skills to a higher level.


ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY LAUNCHPAD

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton The Darkroom Underground Facebook Group by Tim LaytonThe Darkroom Underground Facebook Group by Tim Layton DIY Analog Photography Group by Tim LaytonDIY Analog Photography Group by Tim Layton Analog Photography YouTube Channel by Tim LaytonAnalog Photography YouTube Channel by Tim Layton Tim Layton Photography Facebook Fan PageTim Layton Photography Facebook Fan Page The Tim Layton Fine Art Facebook Fan PageThe Tim Layton Fine Art Facebook Fan Page


TRAINING FOR ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHERS

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

Buy Your Photography, Video, & Technology Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

B&H Photo VideoB&H Photo Video COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white contact printing darkroom emulsion film large format silver gelatin https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/12/new-analog-photography-community-in-2021-with-tim-layton Thu, 10 Dec 2020 16:40:43 GMT
New Vintage Large Format Lens Project by Tim Layton https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/12/vintage-large-format-lens-project-by-tim-layton Vintage Large Format Lens Project by Tim LaytonVintage Large Format Lens Project by Tim Layton I have been wanting to research, document, mount, and photograph a standard still life scene my collection of vintage large format lenses for many years in order to see and compare the optical qualities and characteristics for each of the lenses and also compare them to each other. 

As I get deeper into the project, I suspect my experience will take me down some paths that I am not aware of at this point. 

I hope to discover some new uses and applications for these lenses and then use them in my photography. I suspect I will likely uncover some lenses that really excite me, and others that possibly disappoint. I think the process itself is a real treasure and I am excited to see what I uncover and how I will apply this new information in the future. 

I know that I have researched a wide variety of vintage lenses over the years and while it was possible to find some background information, I could rarely ever find any sample photos taken with the lens.  In this project, I will be sharing as much information as I can about each lens and also creating some brand new photos for every lens in my collection. 

Vintage large format lenses by Tim LaytonVintage large format lenses by Tim Layton I have a passion for photographing floral still life with large format cameras and I hope to find some new lenses that drives me to start a new study.  My Winter Tulips 2013 study was one of my all time personal favorites and also one of my best selling when I was making handmade silver gelatin prints in the darkroom.

In recent years, I have been following the Wild Horses of Missouri and photographing them with my Nikon F6 35mm film camera and then enlarging those to 8x10 large format negatives in order to make large scale silver gelatin prints.

THE NEW PROJECT

Vintage Large Format Lenses by Tim LaytonVintage Large Format Lenses by Tim Layton I am really excited to finally do this project because I have been collecting these lenses for a lot of years.  While I typically mounted them on a temp lens board and exposed a sheet of film or two with them, this new project is going to really help me visualize the optical characteristics of each lens and hopefully help other analog photographers that may be interested in the same or similar lenses.

In this new project, I am mounting all of my current vintage large format lenses on my Chamonix 8x10 camera and photographing a still life scene that I have created in my darkroom.  The scene that you see to the left of this paragraph is the still life scene that I am photographing with the lenses.  You can see a list of my current large format vintage lenses on my "Vintage Lens Page".

Chamonix 8x10 Camera With Iris Lens Board & Sinar Shutter by Tim LaytonChamonix 8x10 Camera With Iris Lens Board & Sinar Shutter by Tim Layton So I don't have to make a new lens board for each lens and also use a shutter, I have mounted an Iris lens board on the front of my Chamonix 8x10 view camera and behind the front standard, I have a Sinar Copal Shutter. 

This configuration allows me to mount any lens with a rear lens barrel width up to a little over 3.5 inches and I can use faster panchromatic film like Ilford HP5 because I have a reliable shutter.

My plan is to photograph the scene with each lens wide open at maximum aperture to see how it performs and what type of image it renders. 

Ultimately, I plan to make a second pass stopping the lens down to an aperture of maybe F8 or F11.  Since I have dozens of lenses to photograph and sheets of film to develop, I am going to shoot the lenses wide open because I bought many of these lenses for their soft focus or bokeh qualities. 

Most of the lenses will fall into the 4x5 or 8x10 formats and so my plan is to use Ilford HP5 film in both formats and develop with my modified version of Kodak D76 that I mix from raw chemicals. Since the lenses span multiple different formats, I will be using the relevant reducing backs on my Chamonix 8x10 view camera.

Follow along as I work my way through my vintage large format lens collection and hopefully we will both learn something and enjoy the journey. 


JOIN ME & OTHER ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHERS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

The Ultra Large Format Photography Facebook Group by Tim LaytonThe Ultra Large Format Photography Facebook Group by Tim Layton The Tim Layton Fine Art Facebook Fan PageThe Tim Layton Fine Art Facebook Fan Page The Darkroom Underground Facebook Group by Tim LaytonThe Darkroom Underground Facebook Group by Tim Layton

ULTRA LARGE FORMAT PHOTOGRAPHY - TIM LAYTON FINE ART - DARKROOM UNDERGROUND


Video Workshops For Analog Photographers

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

Buy Your Photography, Video, & Technology Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

B&H Photo VideoB&H Photo Video COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white film large format vintage https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/12/vintage-large-format-lens-project-by-tim-layton Sun, 06 Dec 2020 23:32:11 GMT
Nikon D6 Field Review For Wildlife Photographers & D6 vs. D5 Overview https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/7/nikon-d6-field-review Nikon D6 Field Review For Wildlife PhotographersNikon D6 Field Review For Wildlife Photographers I rarely direct visitors away from my website to go elsewhere, but in this case, Steve Perry just released a comprehensive field review of the Nikon D6 that is the current definitive source in my opinion. 

Steve is a professional through and through and if you are interested in learning more about the field performance of the Nikon D6, I highly recommend watching his 45 minute video that I have for you directly below.

I have been testing and using the D6 for my personal needs as well, however, Steve's review is much more robust and comprehensive. Grab a cup of your favorite beverage and a notepad and go watch the video. 

My Personal Thoughts About The D6 vs. D5 

I purchased both cameras and I have been using the D5 for many years.  I will summarize my current thoughts about the D6 versus the D5 in the section below and then I will write a much more detailed article about the comparison after I have more time with the D6.

  • The ISO performance is effectively identical in my tests (same conclusion as Steve Perry).  This is one of the primary reasons that I use a 21MP camera versus something like the D850.  The vast majority of my best wildlife photos are always in challenging lighting conditions and ISO performance is more important to me than more megapixels.  
  • The AF system is definitely different and more sophisticated, but I personally don't have enough experience with the D6 yet to know if it offers any real advantages over the proven D5 which is world class. 
  • If you are a current D5 user and you are thinking about upgrading to a D6, think long and hard before parting with your cash.  Make sure you have a use case that warrants the expense.  I personally can't think of one at this time based on my experience.
  • You can purchase a used in like new condition D5 for almost half the cost of a D6 which is my personal recommendation unless there is a very specific reason to purchase the D6. You can also purchase a used D5 with a very low shutter count (<5,000) and a new D850 for the same price as the new D6.  
  • If you already own a D5, I would look at investing in better or new lenses versus looking at the D6
  • You can visit my page where I have my latest articles on the Nikon D5 and D6

 

Video Workshops For Analog Photographers

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world. 

Buy Your Film, Darkroom, and Photography Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) D5 D6 Nikon Wildlife https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/7/nikon-d6-field-review Wed, 29 Jul 2020 21:50:47 GMT
Chigger Management For Wildlife Photographers https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/7/chigger-management-for-wildlife-photographers Chigger Management For Wildlife Photographers by Tim LaytonChigger Management For Wildlife Photographers by Tim Layton As a wildlife photographer if you haven't almost been driven out of your mind by chigger bites, then you probably aren't a true wildlife photographer! Chiggers live in every country around the world, so this is a universal issue for all wildlife photographers. 

It is impossible to avoid natural conditions where chiggers live as a wildlife photographer, so the normal advice of staying away from tall grasses/weeds and heavy undergrowth simply isn't going to cut it.

Chiggers are invisible to the naked eye, so it may seem like there's not much you can do to keep from being bitten and coping with the maddening itching.  

It isn't all bad news.  There are some things you can do to help prevent getting chigger bites and I will share them in the list below.

I use my Nikon D6 and D500 digital cameras along with my Nikon F6 35mm film SLR to create digital negatives for making handmade analog fine art prints in my darkroom.  I love to create platinum and palladium and silver gelatin prints because of their ethereal beauty and elegance.

Learn Platinum & Palladium Printing by Tim LaytonLearn Platinum & Palladium Printing by Tim Layton Learn Platinum & Palladium Printing by Tim LaytonLearn Platinum & Palladium Printing by Tim Layton Learn B&W Darkroom Photography by Tim LaytonLearn B&W Darkroom Photography by Tim Layton

MY CHIGGER MANAGEMENT ROUTINE

Keep in mind that I am a wildlife photographer, not a medical professional.  So, if you decide to use any of my methods for yourself, do so at your own risk and I do not imply any warranty for the advice below. 

1 - Wear long sleeves and tightly woven fabric pants.  This acts as a physical barrier that can help keep chiggers off your body.  Don't forget to tuck in your pant legs in your boots or use rubber bands around your ankles while in the field. 

2 - Use DEET repellent on your clothes.  Some people may be allergic to DEET, so proceed with caution. 

3 - Remove your clothes immediately in the field when you get back to your vehicle or when you return home or to your hotel.  The sooner you can get your field clothes off, the better your chances for avoiding the nightmare of chigger itches. 

I take a second set of clothes with me each time I go into the the field and I wash off my legs, arms, and chest area with hot soapy water inside my van.  Chiggers like ankles, behind your knees, waistline, under your arms, etc.  Basically anywhere your skin touches or folds is a treat to chiggers. After my field washig, I apply a brusque toweling to further dislodge or crush any remaining larvae.  This technique can also be helpful if you can't wash with hot soapy water.  Then I put my field clothes in a trash bag and take home for washing later. 

4 - Shower/Clean with hot soapy water ASAP.  Hot water and soap can kill chiggers.  Chiggers can survive warm or cool water, so make that shower as hot as you can stand it. Lather up several times and rinse thoroughly because chiggers can wander around on your body for hours before going to work on your skin.  Don't forget to apply a brusque toweling to further dislodge or crush any remaining larvae and then put that towel in your trash bag with your field clothes. 

If you do end up with chigger bites anyway, I immediately wipe the chigger bite with apple cider vinegar or rubbing alcohol and then treat with calamine lotion as needed. 

CHIGGERS 101

Chiggers, sometimes called the “redbug” or “harvest mite,” are the larval stage of a mite and technically they are not insects. Chiggers are "arachnids," in the same family as spiders and ticks. During summer, chigger larvae climb onto people and animals while they walk around in infested outdoors vegetation. Chiggers are parasites and their feeding leaves intensely itchy, small reddish welts on the skin that can just about drive you mad. 

Chigger bites often develop tiny red bumps that look like blisters, tiny hives, or small pimples.

People are often bitten by chiggers around the ankles, waist, under arms, and in skin folds after they have been in an outdoor area infested with chigger mites.

The chigger larvae must feed on animal tissue in order to mature. The chigger mite is only parasitic during the larvae stage of its lifecycle.

Larvae wait in large numbers on the tops of grass, leaves, and twigs – usually less than a foot off the ground – for a warm-blooded animal to brush past. They are attracted to the carbon dioxide exhaled by the host and are sensitive to movement. Typically, dozens or more chigger larvae will fasten onto a host at one time.

Once on the host, the chigger larvae look for possible feeding sites. Often chiggers will stop to feed where their movement has been impeded by tight clothing such as a waistband, sock top, or even a backpack strap. The back of knees, under arms, between thighs, in the crook of elbows, and other areas where the skin is folded or thin are also prime feeding areas for the chigger larvae.

To feed, the chigger inserts its mouthparts, called chelicerae, into the host’s skin; usually in a skin pore or hair follicle. Once the chigger is attached, it secretes saliva, which contains proteolytic enzymes, into the host’s skin. The digestive enzymes liquefy the skin tissue so the chigger can ingest it.

The area around the chigger bites soon hardens and a feeding tube, called a sylostome, forms in the puncture wound. It is the feeding tube that causes the itchy, red bump.

Video Workshops For Analog Photographers

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world. 

Buy Your Film, Darkroom, and Photography Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) Chiggers Wildlife Photography https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/7/chigger-management-for-wildlife-photographers Mon, 06 Jul 2020 00:35:00 GMT
"Heavy Burden" - New Silver Gelatin Wild Horses of Missouri Ltd. Ed. Collectors Print by Tim Layton https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/5/new-wild-horses-of-missouri-silver-gelatin-fiber-collectible-print "Heavy Burden" B&W Silver Gelatin Wild Horses of Missouri Limited Edition Collectors Print by Tim Layton"Heavy Burden" B&W Silver Gelatin Wild Horses of Missouri Limited Edition Collectors Print by Tim Layton "Heavy Burden" is my newest limited edition handmade silver gelatin darkroom fine art print from my Wild Horses of Missouri Collection.

This particular print is very special to me because it is my first silver gelatin fiber print in this new series and I had a deeply moving and emotional experience when photographing this mare right after sunrise on a foggy fall morning. 

I am very proud to release this new limited edition collectors print from my Wild Horses of Missouri collection and I can't wait for you to hold it in your hands.  

"Heavy Burden" is an emotional and intimate piece of artwork.  I felt the heaviness in this strong mare's spirit as I photographed and spent time with her.  When you hold this piece of artwork in your hands, I believe you will be transported to a special place and have a sense of her longing to care for her new foal.

In a 21st century digital society it is a rare and uncommon to receive handmade artwork and I hope that you enjoy this special limited edition fine art print as much as I love creating it for you. 

"Heavy Burden" Wild Horses of Missouri Silver Gelatin Gallery Print by Tim Layton"Heavy Burden" Wild Horses of Missouri Silver Gelatin Gallery Print by Tim Layton

LIMITED TIME OFFER

For a limited time, I am offering FREE SHIPPING to anywhere in the world.  

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MOVIE: THE MAKING OF "HEAVY BURDEN"

ARTWORK DETAILS

"Heavy Burden" is limited edition artwork that comes ready to frame in a standard 11"x14" size making it very easy to display your new artwork.

I use the time-tested dry mount method to attach the 8x10 silver gelatin fiber print to an acid-free mounting board and I custom cut a window over-mat to finalize the presentation. 

I take great care in every step of my process to ensure your artwork is something that you will treasure and enjoy for a lifetime.  

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"Heavy Burden" - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton"Heavy Burden" - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton [BUY NOW]

Title: "Heavy Burden"

Medium: Silver Gelatin Black & White 

Paper: Ilford Multi-Grade IV Fiber Classic 

Edition: Limited Edition of 250 with a certificate of authenticity

Dimensions: 11x14 (8x10 print dry mounted with an 11x14 window over-mat) 

Signature: Each print is titled and signed in pencil along with the edition number by Tim Layton. 

Archival Notes: Selenium toned to museum archival standards and dry mounted on acid-free board.

Shipping: The artwork is stored in a an acid-free protective sleeve and carefully packaged between two outer pieces of protected board to ensure it arrives to you safely.

LIMITED TIME OFFER: For a limited time, I am offering FREE SHIPPING to anywhere in the world.  

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BEHIND THE SCENES STORY

"Heavy Burden" - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton"Heavy Burden" - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton I watched the mare emerge from the forest along the river along with her new foal and other members of the herd.  It was just after sunrise when I spotted them.  I followed them for the next hour and as the sun was coming up over the horizon the entire herd came close together and started grazing in the field. 

I worked my way around so the sunlight was behind her because I wanted that special backlighting to help draw out the emotion that I was feeling.  Using my telephoto 600mm F4 lens (12 lbs.) I spent the next hour watching her interact with her new foal while oscilating back and forth between grazing and paying close attention to her foal.

I could instantly sense the care and love that she has for her baby as evidenced by her constant attention and monitoring. It was a long and difficult winter and she looked thin to me, but I also could clearly see strength and resiliance in her spirit too. 

After watching this mare interact with her new foal and the other members of her herd, I sensed a "heavy burden".  It may be a natural inclination to think burdens are negative or undesirable, and while that can be true, I didn't get that feeling from her.  I saw a mother that was committed to their newborn and was willing to do whatever it took to care and nurture her new baby.  In this case, I felt like the burden I sensed was beautiful and a good reminder that duty and commitment can be wonderful and inspiring. 

I left them in peace and I continue to hold this memory and experience close to my heart.  


INFORMATION FOR ART BUYERS & COLLECTORS

Tim Layton at Rocky Creek Herd on 3/29/20Tim Layton at Rocky Creek Herd on 3/29/20 I first saw the Wild Horses of Missouri in 2010 and I was immediately captivated.  I knew from my very first experience that I needed to learn more about the horses and find a way to tell their story to help protect them for current and future generations. 

In 2015, my son and I purchased some land in the Missouri Ozark mountains and built our off-the-grid homes and darkroom. 

Long before I made this major change in my life, I envisioned the ability to create artist original fine art with purpose and meaning.  

After two years of building our homes, darkroom, and workshops, I finally was able to start searching for the wild horses.

Over the next two years, I learned where the four different herds of wild horses tended to roam and I studied their behavior.  I discovered that wild horses are very similar to human beings because they put their family first and show love for them.  Each of the horses has a specific role and job in the herd and they also know how to have fun too.  

Ten years later from my first encounter and I feel like I am just getting started.  I am at a place where I know the land and the behaviors of the herds very well now.  I feel great joy following and learning something new with every encounter.  

I hope that my joy, respect, love and appreciation for the wild horses comes through in my artwork. It is truly my honor to create this special collectors editions of handmade analog fine artwork for you.   

In a 21st century digital society it is a rare treat and uncommon to receive handmade artwork and I hope that you enjoy these special prints as much as I love creating it for you. 

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PURCHASE INFORMATION FOR COLLECTORS

"Heavy Burden" Wild Horses of Missouri Silver Gelatin Gallery Print by Tim Layton"Heavy Burden" Wild Horses of Missouri Silver Gelatin Gallery Print by Tim Layton "Heavy Burden" is dry mounted on an acid-free 11x14 4-ply mat board along with a custom-cut window mat that is hinge taped to archival standards.

These limited edition prints are titled and signed by me and they include a certificate of authenticity documenting all of the details. 

Each silver gelatin fiber print is hand made in my darkroom using the same process as the legends that came before us like Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alfred Stieglitz, Minor White, and Irving Penn.

Limited Edition Silver Gelatin Print Details

  • Ilford MGIV silver gelatin fiber paper is hand-selected for the ultimate quality. 
  • Your print is selenium toned by hand using a visual inspection method for the optimum tonal values and maximum archival qualities. 
  • Your new artwork is titled, signed, and numbered by Tim Layton and you receive a certificate of authenticity to properly document your investment.

[BUY NOW]


TECHNICAL INFORMATION FOR COLLECTORS

"Heavy Burden" Wild Horses of Missouri Silver Gelatin Gallery Print by Tim Layton"Heavy Burden" Wild Horses of Missouri Silver Gelatin Gallery Print by Tim Layton "Heavy Burden" is a silver gelatin split-grade contact print made by hand with a film negative in the darkroom.

My workflow begins with capturing the wild horses on 35mm film.  I typically use Kodak Tri-X or Ilford HP5 depending on the desired contrast and lighting conditions. On occasion, I will use a slower film, Ilford FP4. 

I develop the film in a custom-mixed version of Kodak's D-76 formula and the process the film using an archival workflow. 

Once the film is completely dry, I need to enlarger the negative so that I can make bigger contact prints.  I use one of two methods for making the enlarged negatives.  For my analog workflow, I make an inter-positive by enlarging the 35mm film to an 8x10 sheet of Bergger Print film and then I contact print the new inter-positive to an 8x10 sheet of either Ortho, Print, or FP4 sheet film.  If I decide to make a digital negative, I edit the scanned negative in Photoshop and then print the enlarged negative on my Epson P800 with Pictorico film. 

Once the enlarged negative is created, I make the split-grade darkroom print as shown in the video above.  It is a delicate process where I balance my creative vision agains the tonal pallet that is possible with the film, paper, and developer choice.  

I follow the same archival workflow as documented by Ansel Adams to ensure my silver gelatin fiber prints are truly archival quality.  

Once I am satisfied with the wet print, I then tone each print in Kodak Rapid Selenium Toner to enhance the DMAX and contrast as well as extend the archival properties of the fiber-based silver gelatin print. 

I allow each print to air dry on a screen for about two days and then I begin the flatten process which is either under heavy glass plates or I sometimes use my dry mount press.  

Once the prints are flattened, I dry mount the 8x10 silver gelatin contact prints on 4-ply acid free museum quality board and cut a custom window mat.  

I sign, title, and edition each print in pencil and I include a certificate of authenticity with each print.  

In the next few weeks, I will begin offering hand-made wooden frames to make the artwork ready to hang the moment you receive it.  More on this to following soon.

Video Workshops For Analog Photographers

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world. 

Buy Your Film, Darkroom, and Photography Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) Eminence Fine Art B&W Prints Missouri Shannon County Silver Gelatin Wild Horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/5/new-wild-horses-of-missouri-silver-gelatin-fiber-collectible-print Sat, 02 May 2020 00:51:05 GMT
New Bergger Print Film For Making Analog Enlarged Negatives https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/4/using-the-new-bergger-print-film-to-make-enlarged-negatives New Bergger Print Film For Making Analog Enlarged Negatives by Tim LaytonNew Bergger Print Film For Making Analog Enlarged Negatives by Tim Layton If you have been following me for very long, you probably already know that I like to use 35mm black and white film (Tri-X, FP4, HP5) to photograph the Wild Horses of Missouri

Because I make platinum as well as silver gelatin contact prints and enlargements, I need negatives bigger than my original 35mm film. 

Because the horses are so fast and unpredictable, I need the mobility and flexibility of my Nikon F6 and 600 F4 and 300 F2.8 telephoto lenses to photograph the horses, but I need 8x10 and larger negatives to make my fine art prints and hence the reason for this article.

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton My current Kodak Tri-X film developed in my DIY version of D-76 is serving me very well and meets my creative vision, but it is too small to make my contact prints or big enlargements.

One of the ways to make a high quality enlarged negative is with print film.  It has been a long time since a black and white print film has been available, so when I learned that Bergger was releasing this new film, I was extremely happy.  I will explain the reasons for my happiness in the sections below. 

Bergger Printfilm is a continuous tone black and white technical film that is blue sensitive for darkroom use with an ISO rating of 3. It is available in sheets from 4x5 up to an amazing 20x24 and even rolls are available.  


If you have been making digital negatives or would simply like to use analog negatives for your alternative prints, then keep reading.

MAKING ENLARGED ANALOG NEGATIVES

Shawnee Boss Mare - 02/23/20 by Tim LaytonShawnee Boss Mare - 02/23/20 by Tim Layton Before I share some key information about the new Bergger Printfilm, I will share how I have been making my enlarged negatives over the last 15 to 20 years.  

In a nutshell, you have two options for making enlarged negatives.  You can either employ a two-step method where you make an inter-positive and then make the enlarged negative or use a reversal processing method to directly duplicate the original negative.  

I have been using Ortho film to make my inter-positives as well as my enlarged negatives developed in diluted Dektol, but now that a high-resolution continuous tone low ISO film is available, this could be a game changer for me and other alternative fine art printmakers. 

Due to is slow speed and extremely high resolution it is much more appropriate for use in the darkroom under an enlarger.  Faster Ortho film require very short exposures which can range from very challenging to undoable, not to mention the lack of the option to dodge and burn. And panchromatic films like T-Max 100 requires you to work in total darkness and then you are still dealing with the same issues because of the faster ISO rating. 

USING THE BERGGER PRINTFILM

Shawnee Boss Mare - 02/23/20 by Tim LaytonShawnee Boss Mare - 02/23/20 by Tim Layton Since my source negative is 35mm for my wild horse images, it makes sense to enlarge to 4x5 print film for my inter-positive because I won't really have any loss of quality at that size and I gain the advantage of cropping and adjusting the image placement on the negative.  Going from a 2:3 aspect ratio to 4:5, there will naturally be some cropping anyway.  

Then I load my 4x5 enlarged inter-positive into my enlarger and then I can make my new negative up to 20x24 with pre-cut sheets of film.  Yes, you read that correctly.  Bergger is making sheets of this film from 4x5 up to 20x24.  

I can control the contrast in each step of the process which makes the workflow capable of being repeatable and consistent. 

The Bergger Printfilm is coated on a 175 micron PET base and has a special red colored anti-static layer on the back of the film which is part of the reason for its very high resolution. 

The film is mainly sensitive to blue light and it is safe to use under regular darkroom safelights too. The new print film also has an anti-static layer which should help with all those little annoying dust particles that drive us nuts.

Bergger Print Film Film Development Chart with D-76 at 22CBergger Print Film Film Development Chart with D-76 at 22C The best part is that this film can be developed in film or paper developers and processed manually or in automated processors.  

My personal plan is to develop in my DIY formula of Kodak D-76 stock and I will control the contrast via development time vs. via dilution like I would with a paper developer and Ortho film. 

As you can see from the film development curve, the contrast index increases with development time. 

A good starting place with this film is to rate it at ISO 3 and use Kodak D-76 at 22C and develop in a tray for about 6 minutes for silver gelatin, 7:30 to 8:00 for AZO type emulsions, and about 9:00 to 10:00 minutes for platinum and palladium prints.  

I have proper testing to conduct with this film and developer as describe above, but I wanted to share the basics with you and then loop back after I spend some time with this new and unique print film. 

In addition to making inter-positives and enlarged negatives as described above, you could even load this ISO 3 film in your large format camera for a totally different look and feeling than modern day panchromatic film. 

I am super excite to make some analog enlarged negatives with Bergger Printfilm for my Wild Horses of Missouri platinum prints. 

As soon as the new film arrives, I will be using it right away and I will write a new article and share my negatives and platinum prints with you. 

-Tim Layton

If you like the information in this article, then you will love being part of our new Analog Photography Community where Tim Jr and I share exclusive member-only details such as my personal notes and specific details about the content in this article.

 


NEW ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY COMMUNITY

Tim Layton Fine Art Analog Photography Patreon CommunityTim Layton Fine Art Analog Photography Patreon Community

If you like the information in this article, then you will love being part of my new Analog Photography Community where we share additional member only details in addition to creating exclusive video tutorials, and detailed articles every week to help analog photographers take their creative vision and technical skills to a higher level.


ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY LAUNCHPAD

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton The Darkroom Underground Facebook Group by Tim LaytonThe Darkroom Underground Facebook Group by Tim Layton DIY Analog Photography Group by Tim LaytonDIY Analog Photography Group by Tim Layton Analog Photography YouTube Channel by Tim LaytonAnalog Photography YouTube Channel by Tim Layton Tim Layton Photography Facebook Fan PageTim Layton Photography Facebook Fan Page The Tim Layton Fine Art Facebook Fan PageThe Tim Layton Fine Art Facebook Fan Page


TRAINING FOR ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHERS

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world.

Buy Your Photography, Video, & Technology Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

B&H Photo VideoB&H Photo Video COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/4/using-the-new-bergger-print-film-to-make-enlarged-negatives Thu, 02 Apr 2020 04:26:11 GMT
3 Reasons Why Hiking Improves Your Photography https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/3/3-reasons-why-hiking-improves-your-photography 3 Reasons Why Hiking Improves Your Photography by Tim Layton3 Reasons Why Hiking Improves Your Photography by Tim Layton In this article today, I am going to share three key reasons how hiking can improve your photography, no matter your genre. 

We don't need evidence or reminders of the health and mental benefits of being outside in nature and getting physical exercise.  All of these benefits are well documented and understood by most people. 

In fact, hiking outdoors is a key part of my long-term health management plan and it is something that I do daily. Between hiking and making nutrition a priority, I am doing everything I can to be healthy and strong for myself and so I can continue to work and hopefully be a positive influence and make a small difference in the world. 

Before I share the three reasons why I believe hiking can improve your photography, I will share a quick update on some new hiking trails that I have been working on over this last year on my land in the Missouri Ozark Mountains.  

The terrain in the Missouri Ozark Mountain region is rugged and often difficult to navigate via foot.  I like this because it is a great workout and of course being surrounded by over a million acres in the Mark Twain National Forest is natures paradise. 

I wanted to have a trail system right outside my doorstep that could use and enjoy every day.  My land borders the national forest so I also get the benefit of hiking and enjoying the massive footprint of the forest too.  

I started to cut in a hiking and mountain biking trail system last year with my tractor and I am making good progress.  I will share some of the photos from my hike today to show you the current status of the trail system. 

We are just coming out of winter and I am starting to see the very first signs of spring with the daffodils blooming and the Eastern redbuds starting to show initial signs of blooming too.  The photos of the trails today still have that winter look, but in about 4 to 5 weeks, almost everything will be green and beautiful.  I will share some new photos and another update at that time so you can see how vibrant and different it looks in full bloom. 

I am primarily working on the trail system for my own personal health plan, but I am thinking about hosting analog photography-based workshops on my land in the future where photographers can come for a few days and totally immerse themselves into nature and then of course, spend some quality time in my darkroom developing film and making prints.  I will keep you posted on this as well.

At the time of this article we are still in the middle of the global coronavirus pandemic.  I hope that you and your families are well.  I also hope that you have the opportunity to unplug from the chaos and constant influx of depressing news doing whatever it is that you enjoy. 

I will share a few of the trail photos that I took today directly below and then scroll down to learn the three reasons why I believe hiking can improve your photography. 

New Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim LaytonNew Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim Layton New Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim LaytonNew Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim Layton New Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim LaytonNew Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim Layton New Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim LaytonNew Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim Layton New Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim LaytonNew Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim Layton New Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim LaytonNew Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim Layton New Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim LaytonNew Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim Layton New Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim LaytonNew Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim Layton New Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim LaytonNew Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim Layton New Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim LaytonNew Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim Layton New Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim LaytonNew Hiking Trails Winter Update (3/25/20) by Tim Layton

3 REASONS WHY HIKING CAN IMPROVE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

1 - Improved Creativity.  No matter your preferred genre, you need creative juices to make your best work.  By getting outdoors and working your body, your mind relaxes and you are refreshed.  Some of my most successful photography projects are a result of ideas that I had while hiking. 

2 - Increased Stamina.  Photography can be emotionally and sometimes physically draining.  Having a strong body along with a clear and refreshed mind is key to creating your best work.  

3 - Improved Focus.  Being able to focus and be present during creative sessions is really important and I believe a key part of what helps us create our best work.  Hiking not only relaxes and refreshes us, but I also found out that my ability to focus without my mind being distracted or overworked by other influences. 

If you are physically able to get outdoors and hike or whatever form of exercise that you prefer, I strongly encourage you to make it a priority and your photography along with your sense of wellbeing and health will probably improve too.

I like to start my day with about 5 miles of hiking as a way to get my day started on the right track.  

Scroll down and share your favorite places to hike.  

-Tim Layton

Video Workshops For Analog Photographers

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world. 

Buy Your Film, Darkroom, and Photography Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

 

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) hiking nature outdoors photography https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/3/3-reasons-why-hiking-improves-your-photography Sat, 28 Mar 2020 12:34:44 GMT
Managing Uncertainty as a Creative Soul https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/3/managing-uncertainty-as-a-creative-soul Managing Uncertainty as a Creative Soul by Tim LaytonManaging Uncertainty as a Creative Soul by Tim Layton Our current times are unlike anything most of the world has ever experienced before, so I wanted to share some inspirational and hopefully helpful information with you in this article today. 

Creative people like photographers, painters, musicians, actors, and many others are special people that think and feel deeply.  I believe many of us create as a way to express ourselves in a way that we simply can't do with words.  Because many of us feel so deeply, I think we can be sensitive to uncertainty.  

I have found it very difficult over the last two weeks to be creative during these stressful times and I suspect many of you may feel the same way.  I will share my general approach with you in hopes that it may help you as well.  

MY GENERAL APPROACH

Tim LaytonTim Layton First, I am making sure that I get plenty of exercise every day.  I hike every morning and typically in the late afternoons/early evenings as well.  This is a time for me to just relax, connect with nature, and some of my best ideas occur during these hikes.  I find hiking to be a major stress reliever and maybe you was well. 

Second, I limit my updates on the pandemic to just once a day to the CDC and WHO websites. Everything that I need to know is published on these two resources and I appreciate they are not influenced by the media. 

I also set time aside to work uninterrupted on my current Wild Horses of Missouri Project. I have a million things I am working on in order to get ready for exhibits next year.  I am working through the process of making the platinum and platinum/palladium prints right now.  I am currently working on a few different methods to hand tear the paper for my finished prints and I am also exploring hand making some paper for some select pieces of artwork too.  I turn off all my technology during this focused work sessions and deeply immerse myself.  

I check in on my family and closest friends just about every day to make sure they are doing well, even when I am remote in the mountains.  I have a satellite device that allows me to communicate when there is no mobile signal.  I keep the communications brief because it is expensive. I also Facetime using my iPhone with friends and family when I have a mobile signal to keep that human connection going.  This is especially important if you are self-isolating. 

It is also important for me to continue to help people.  Beyond my personal life with my family and friends, I deeply enjoy helping fellow photographers of all levels take their photography in new directors or to a new level.  This is why I actively share the full array of details of my photography projects in addition to sharing my video workshops and guidebooks. 

I would love to hear from you about some of the things that you are doing to help manage the uncertainty during these difficult times.  Please share your comment at the bottom of this article.

MANAGING UNCERTAINTY

Tim Layton at Continental DivideTim Layton at Continental Divide Not many people could have ever imagined a global pandemic involving the Coronavirus before just a couple of months ago.  I personally believe we are in the early stages of a much larger and more complicated chapter that will likely change us forever. 

While I am not personally concerned about my health as it relates to the virus, many people are, and probably should be, based on what has already happened so far.  There are certain segments of the population, like the elderly that are at much higher risk.  

Even if you take the health issues off the table, the global impact on the economy is unlike anything we have ever seen before in history and I think it is just the tip of the iceberg.  I think there is a good chance if this continues on the current trajectory, a global recession is probably going to happen before the end of this year.  I am not an economist or even claim to understand all the complex details of the global economy, but I do have common sense and a unique ability to sense when things are concerning.  

Forest Sunrise by Tim LaytonForest Sunrise by Tim Layton What do we do with all of these concerns?  How do we manage and cope with such uncertainty?  I honestly don't claim to have the answers to these very difficult questions, but I think there are some fundamentals that we can do to help reduce the stress and anxiety. 

As a creative person, what motivates you to create?  Is your "why" changing in these unprecedented times of uncertainty? 

I encourage you to reflect about these matters and consider them in context of the current conditions.  You may discover a new opportunity to create new artwork that otherwise would have never happened.    

Self-isolating in nature is one of the current recommendations related to the pandemic that I think may be more helpful than just isolating you from other people that may have the Coronavirus.

I wrote an article in 2016, "Why Nature Matters" that may resonate with some people based on our current conditions. 

I believe that most people are wired to desire nature (e.g., sunshine, fresh air, scenic vistas, mountains).  I personally believe nature is a healing and restorative opportunity that might be exactly what many of us to pursue.  Whether that means taking a walk on your local park or hiking in the mountains like I am right now, just get outside, unplug from all the electronics in your life and allow yourself to connect with nature in a deep and meaningful way.  Even if nature isn't your preference, consider giving it a try and see if you feel a little less stressed about the current circumstances.  

McBaine Bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) tree Sunset by Tim LaytonMcBaine Bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) tree Sunset by Tim Layton No one can avoid the unexpected. But the simple steps listed below can help you better face life’s uncertainties. 

The APA (American Psychological Association) published some tips for how you can cope with uncertainties in general and I think several of these suggestions are applicable to the global pandemic that we are experiencing right now.  Review these tips and hopefully a few of them will resonate with you and be helpful. 

Be kind to yourself. Some people are better at dealing with uncertainties than others, so don’t beat yourself up if your tolerance for unpredictability is lower than a friend’s. Remind yourself that it might take time for the stressful situation to resolve, and be patient with yourself in the meantime.

Reflect on past successes. Chances are you’ve overcome stressful events in the past – and you survived! Give yourself credit. Reflect on what you did during that event that was helpful, and what you might like to do differently this time.

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Develop new skills
. When life is relatively calm, make a point to try things outside your comfort zone. From standing up to a difficult boss to trying a new sport, taking risks helps you develop confidence and skills that come in handy when life veers off course.

Limit exposure to news. When we’re stressed about something, it can be hard to look away. But compulsively checking the news only keeps you wound up. Try to limit your check-ins and avoid the news during vulnerable times of day, such as right before bedtime.

Avoid dwelling on things you can’t control. When uncertainty strikes, many people immediately imagine worst-case scenarios. Get out of the habit of ruminating on negative events.

Take your own advice. Ask yourself: If a friend came to me with this worry, what would I tell her? Imagining your situation from the outside can often provide perspective and fresh ideas.

Crested Butte - Rocky MountainsCrested Butte - Rocky Mountains Engage in self-care. Don’t let stress derail your healthy routines. Make efforts to eat well, exercise and get enough sleep. Many people find stress release in practices such as yoga and meditation.

Seek support from those you trust. Many people isolate themselves when they’re stressed or worried. But social support is important, so reach out to family and friends.

Control what you can. Focus on the things that are within your control, even if it’s as simple as weekly meal planning or laying out your clothes the night before a stressful day. Establish routines to give your days and weeks some comforting structure.

Ask for help. If you’re having trouble managing stress and coping with uncertainty on your own, ask for help. Psychologists are experts in helping people develop healthy ways to cope with stress.

I hope that you found at least one thing in this article today that was helpful for you.  Share your comments and suggestions below.  

-Tim Layton

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) Creative Inspiration https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/3/managing-uncertainty-as-a-creative-soul Sat, 21 Mar 2020 03:24:35 GMT
How I Updated My UV Printer With LED Lights https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/3/how-i-updated-my-uv-printer-for-platinum-printing-with-led-lights How I Updated My UV Printer With LED Lights by Tim LaytonHow I Updated My UV Printer With LED Lights by Tim Layton I have used fluorescent Black Light Blue (BLB) lights for many years to make my platinum and platinum/palladium prints. 

In fact, my very first video workshop was on how to create a DIY UV Printer for alternative photographers. This article is an update for this workshop and even if you didn't purchase the detailed step-by-step video workshop, I think you will still gain a lot of value from the information in this article.  All of the information in the DIY UV workshop is still valid and this new information about how to use LED lights is simply an update based on the new technology that is available now. 

If you are interested in learning how to make platinum and palladium prints, I have a step-by-step guidebook and video workshop that will guide you through the entire process.  

Please read the entire article before sending questions.  I promise you that everything you need to know is contained in this article and I use this exact setup to make all of my platinum and platinum/palladium prints.  So far, I have made over 125 prints with this setup and all of them are flawless.  I don't mind answering questions, but I think this modification is so simple that photographers tend to overthink things and start to question it or be influenced by other people in online forums.  I promise, it is simple and it works. 

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton Recently I noticed some of my fluorescent lights were not working correctly, unfortunately after I ruined several platinum prints. Several of the lights were not functioning because they were just simply loose and I didn't realize it until I figured out the issue based on the prints. I decided it was time to finally test some LED black lights to see if they would really work or not.  

For my fluorescent black lights, I used GE Lighting Black Light Blue (BLB) # 34747 20-Watt fluorescent bulbs that emit at UV-A 368nm.  I have made a lot of platinum and platinum/palladium prints with these bulbs and I really like them.  So, I knew that I wanted to make sure the new LED lights could produce a very similar result.

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton

The very first thing that I researched with the light spectrum of the LED lights as compared to my BLB bulbs.  

Light Spectrum Reference
450 – 400 nm Violet, (visible light)
400 – 320 nm UV-A, Long Wave, Black Light
320 – 280 nm UV-B, Medium Wave

When I started searching for an LED replacement solution, I knew that I wanted to find lights that were within the UV-A spectrum for sure and if possible, something very close to my original GE bulbs because I really like the look of my platinum prints. I was also hopeful that I could reduce my standard 10 minute exposure time with the new LED lights. Faster printing times are advantageous especially for platinum prints because of the moisture in the paper and sensitizer can dry out over time and produce prints with a weaker DMAX.  

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The main challenge that I was finding was how the LED lights were configured.  I needed a solution that emitted light much like the classic fluorescent lights and I just wasn't finding what I was looking for.  

I finally found some LED lights that were physically built very similar to fluorescent lights, so I knew this was the lights that I wanted to try first. 

My original GE BLB lights were rated at 20 watts each and the new LED lights were rated at 9W/395nm, but you have to keep in mind the rating differences between fluorescent and LED lights.  I did a quick conversion and determined that the 9W LED lights would be equal to about 40 watts in fluorescent giving me twice the light.  In theory, this should reduce my printing time significantly which is highly desirable for platinum printing as previously noted. 

Only final testing would confirm if the new LED lights would make a beautiful platinum print and if my printing time was reduced.  Hang in there and I will share my results with you. 

I was able to find a very interesting LED replacement (Barrina UV LED Blacklight Bar, 9W 2ft, T5 Integrated Bulb, Black Light Fixture) on Amazon.  They come with a three-year warranty and rated at an astounding 35,000-hour lifetime capacity.  The physical layout and the light spectrum should work very well, but there is no way to know unless I simply built the unit and made some real platinum prints. 

My original GE lights were 2 feet and the new LED's lights were also 2 feet making the conversion very simple and quick in my existing UV printer.  

REPLACEMENT PROCESS

New LED Update To My UV Printer For Platinum Prints by Tim LaytonNew LED Update To My UV Printer For Platinum Prints by Tim Layton Since I was wading into new waters with the LED lights, I didn't want to disassemble my tried and tested BLB fluorescent assembly in case the new LED lights didn't work how I expected.  

You can see in the picture to the left that I built my UV printer with a hinged top.  So, I simply removed the hinged top and went and cut a new piece of plywood to the same size and placed the new LED lights in the same manner as the BLB fluorescent lamps. 

My bigger UV printer will allow me to make platinum prints up to 20" x 24".  I actually built two UV printers, one for the bigger prints, and one optimized for 8x10 prints that I used in my Sprinter van when on the road. The design was exactly the same for both UV printers.  Note that I had a total of 10 20-watt BLB bulbs in the larger UV printer.  

In the new LED solution, I ended up only using 8 lights spaced 2.5 inches apart over the 22-inch width. 

In the images below, I laid out the new LED lights and got them all connected together in about 20 minutes. 

New LED Update To My UV Printer For Platinum Prints by Tim LaytonNew LED Update To My UV Printer For Platinum Prints by Tim Layton

New LED Update To My UV Printer For Platinum Prints by Tim LaytonNew LED Update To My UV Printer For Platinum Prints by Tim Layton

New LED Update To My UV Printer For Platinum Prints by Tim LaytonNew LED Update To My UV Printer For Platinum Prints by Tim Layton

New LED Update To My UV Printer For Platinum Prints by Tim LaytonNew LED Update To My UV Printer For Platinum Prints by Tim Layton

In the image directly below this is what the lights looked light when they were all connected in series and mounted on the new piece of plywood. These specific lights allow up to a maximum of 10 lights to be connected together in series.  

LED UV Lights For Making Platinum & Palladium Prints by Tim LaytonLED UV Lights For Making Platinum & Palladium Prints by Tim Layton

Free Analog Photography Journal by Tim LaytonFree Analog Photography Journal by Tim Layton

The entire update project took about 45 minutes and that included the time to gather the tools and also cut the new piece of plywood.  If I determine I want more lights, I can add up to two more at a later time. 

In the image to the left, you see the newly assembled LED 8-light system. 

I proceeded to perform some exposure tests to identify my new standard printing time. 

Remember with my old BLB system, my standard printing time was 10 to 11 minutes. 

With the new LED system, my standard print time has been reduced to an amazing 3 to 4 minutes!

As noted above, this is a good thing for platinum printing because the sensitized paper retains its moisture profile better with shorter exposure times and this is hugely beneficial for getting those darker and richer tones.

Next, it was time to make a real test print using an existing negative and comparing it to a previous print made with the BLB bulbs.  I kept literally everything the same except for using the shorter exposure time.  The top print was made with my BLB bulbs with an exposure time of 11 minutes as you can see from my notes on the print.  The lower print was made with the new LED lights with an exposure time of 4 minutes. 

UPDATE

I have now made over 125 platinum and platinum/palladium prints in this UV printer using a variety of different papers and developers and it works fantastic and without a single issue.  I can say based on first hand experience using these specific LED replacement lights has been one of the best improvements of my workflow in many years.  I have significantly shorter printing times which leads to richer tones and deeper blacks.   

If you are interested in learning how to make platinum and palladium prints, I have a step-by-step guidebook and video workshop that will guide you through the entire process.

Wild Horses of Missouri Platinum Print "Heavy Burden" by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri Platinum Print "Heavy Burden" by Tim Layton Wild Horses of Missouri Platinum Print "The Nomads" by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri Platinum Print "The Nomads" by Tim Layton

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Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) alternative photography analog photography black and white darkroom fine art palladium platinum https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/3/how-i-updated-my-uv-printer-for-platinum-printing-with-led-lights Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:16:12 GMT
Wild Horse Diary: March 07, 2020 - New Foal in The Broadfoot Herd https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/3/wild-horse-diary-march-07-2020-new-foal-in-broadfoot-herd Wild Horse Diary - March 07, 2020 by Tim LaytonWild Horse Diary - March 07, 2020 by Tim Layton It was another beautiful day in the Missouri Ozark's that seemed like a spring day.  Springtime is right around the corner and I can barely wait till it is here.  My spring fever is mounting by the day.  

In just 12 days on March 19th, the first day of spring will officially start and I am sure the wild horses will be very happy to see the new grass too.  

I visited the Broadfoot herd back on February 23, 2020 and we had an incredible time. During this sighting, I got to see the stallion strut his stuff and interact with some of the mares and it was incredible to watch him run at full speed across the field.

In the Wild Horse Diary today, I am delighted to let you know there is a brand new foal in the Broadfoot herd! To the best of my knowledge, this is the first official reporting of the new foal.  I did a comprehensive search via Google and did not find any references to the new foal. 

NEW FOAL IN THE BROADFOOT HERD

New Foal in the Broadfoot Herd by Tim LaytonNew Foal in the Broadfoot Herd by Tim Layton I am excited to announce there is now a total of 15 horses in the Broadfoot herd as of today

Sometime between February 23, 2020 (my last sighting of the herd) and today (March 07, 2020) a new foal was born

As you can see in the photo to the left, the new foal has a large white spot on its forehead right between its eyes above its muzzle versus the other foal has a group of white markings on its rear right quarters. I believe the other foal is about four to six weeks old based on my personal sightings of this herd and it is a male.  

When we find a herd, the first thing that we do is to count them and note the number of foals, yearlings, colts, fillies, and mares.  It isn't always possible to identify the gender, so sometimes we have to just document what we can.  I keep a detailed journal of each horse in the herd with a description and photo if I have one of their distinctive markings.  This helps me know if the same horses are in the herd or if a new member has been added.  

When we first found the herd we counted 14 which was the same as our last sighting.  I didn't think any more about it and went to work trying to verify if the same members were in the herd today and then I started trying to document the genders on some missing information.  

New Foal in the Broadfoot Herd by Tim LaytonNew Foal in the Broadfoot Herd by Tim Layton Then about an hour into the experience, I noticed a very dark blob out in the field about 150 yards from me.  It was far enough that I couldn't really identify what it was, so I pointed my 600mm F4 lens and discovered it was a little foal.  

In the photo to the left, you can see the little foal sleeping on the ground next to the mare.  

So, I started the count again and I got 15.  Then, I thought that I probably miscounted, so I checked again and got 15.  It was at this time that I realized there was a new foal in the Broadfoot herd, but I was concerned.  

I realized that I had been there for about an hour and I was just now noticing the new foal.  The foal had not moved an inch during that entire time, so I started looking at it more closely through my long telephoto lens.  I increasingly became more concerned because I saw the mare grazing all around the foal and she even brushed the foals head and there was no movement.  At this point, I was thinking the foal might not be alive and so I started working my way closer so that I could get a better look.  

About 15 minutes into my accent towards the foal, it popped up on its feel and started looking around!  Within a few seconds the new foal started nursing and I was relieved.  I watched the new foal for about another hour or so from 100+ yards away and I was unable to identify the gender, but I was able to document some unique markings, so hopefully in the near future I will be able to identify the gender and let you know.

New Foal in the Broadfoot Herd by Tim LaytonNew Foal in the Broadfoot Herd by Tim Layton In the photo to the left, the stallion is on the far left behind the sleeping foal and the mare is to the right.

It was an incredible day with the Broadfoot herd and I am excited to photograph this new little baby in the coming weeks and months. 

As previously noted above, there is another foal that looks to be a month or more old, so it will be a lot of fun watching them play together in the future.

The long winter is almost behind us now and I couldn't be any more excited about the wild horses if I tried.

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Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

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Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) eminence missouri nature ozark national scenic riverways ozarks shannon county wild horses wildlife https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/3/wild-horse-diary-march-07-2020-new-foal-in-broadfoot-herd Sun, 08 Mar 2020 00:54:45 GMT
My New Favorite iPhone App For The Darkroom in 2020 https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/2/my-new-favorite-iphone-app-for-the-darkroom My New Favorite iPhone App For The Darkroom by Tim LaytonMy New Favorite iPhone App For The Darkroom by Tim Layton A few years ago, I discovered and started using Mark II Artist's Viewfinder to simplify the scouting and composition process for all of my large format cameras. Four years later, I stumbled on to my new favorite iPhone app that has simplified my darkroom workflow and I am going to share it with you today.  The name of the application is Darkroom Clock and it is developed by Adam Fowler. And, yes, it is free! 

I love this application for a few different reasons.  First, I have been using a variety of battery-powered timers in the darkroom for as long as I can remember.  They eventually break and then I replace them.  Often times, depending on the process, I can't even see them.  With this free Darkroom Clock app for my iPhone, I can configure it to be safe while working under a red safelight. It comes preloaded with some film and print development sequences that can be easily updated or even deleted if you wish. In less than 5 minutes, I was able to set up my fiber and RC print development processes to include the archival workflow too.  Using the iPhone's accessibility shortcuts feature, I can put my iPhone into darkroom safe mode and use the timer to make my prints. I will include the developer's description in the section below, and then I will walk you through some of the features that I like about this app in addition to showing you how to make your iPhone safe to use in the darkroom.  

Darkroom Timer App by Adam FowlerDarkroom Timer App by Adam Fowler Darkroom Clock is a flexible darkroom timer app suitable for both film and photo development. Build your own development recipes with separate timers for each stage of your development process. The app includes:

- fully configurable development recipes.

- darkroom mode (safe to use with B&W photographic paper).

- A clear display with all the information you need.

- the whole screen is the start/stop button for the timers

- notifications if you leave the app while a timer is still running

How To Configure Your iPhone To Be Darkroom Safe

In this section, I will walk you through how you can configure and use your iPhone while working in the darkroom.  As a general rule, I try and avoid taking my phone into the darkroom, but there are times when I am waiting for a call or I simply need access to the phone while working.  I am currently using iOS version 13.3 and my instructions are based on this software. 

Follow these steps to make your iPhone darkroom safe:

Go to Settings, Accessibility, Display & Text Size, and locate Color Filters.  

Darkroom Timer App by Adam FowlerDarkroom Timer App by Adam Fowler Click on Color filters and you will see a screen that looks like a line of colored pencils.  There is a toggle switch directly below the colored pencils.  Turn that on and then scroll down and move the sliders complete to the far right for Intensity and Hue. Your phone screen will be red now!! 

You can just turn this on and off as you wish if you need to use your phone in the darkroom for whatever reason. 

If you want to create a shortcut to turn this on and off, I have a neat little trick for you.  

Go to Settings, Accessibility and scroll down to the very bottom to Accessibility Shortcut. Find Color Filters in the list and click it to enable it.  It will have a little blue checkmark next to it now.  You may have other items enabled as well, and that is fine. 

Exit out of the Settings area and then triple-click on the right button on your iPhone.  There is only one button on the right side of your phone, so you can confuse this with anything else.  When you do that, Accessibility Shortcuts will pop up from the bottom of your screen and you will see Color Filters on that list.  If you click on that, you will put your iPhone into darkroom safelight mode! 

If you want to disable it when you are done working in the darkroom, just triple-click the right button and select Color Filters again and it will disable it.

Tips On The Darkroom Timer Application

If you haven't already done so, go to the App Store on your iPhone and download the Darkroom Clock application. After you get it installed, launch it and you will see a screen that looks like the one on the left in the illustration below. 

Darkroom Timer App by Adam FowlerDarkroom Timer App by Adam Fowler

From here, you can edit, modify, delete, or add your own processes for film or print development.  The application is very basic and very simple to use.  You can either use the Accessibility Shortcut that I showed you how to enable in the section above to put your timer into darkroom safelight mode, or you can click on the "triple hamburger" icon in the upper right corner of the app and enable "Darkroom Mode".  Since you have already set up the Color Filters as described above, you are ready to go. 

While you are in the settings area, you can also enable screen dimming (I do) and Auto Advance mode (move to next step in your sequence after a pre-determined interval).  I personally don't want the auto-advance sequence enabled because depending on the number of sheets of film or paper I am developing, I am not sure how long that will take before proceeding to the next step in the process. It beeps to let you know each stage is complete and all you have to do is touch anywhere on the screen to activate the next time sequence.

Give it a try and let me know what you think. 

-Tim

Video Workshops For Analog Photographers

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world. 

Buy Your Film, Darkroom, and Photography Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography App black and white darkroom film fine art iPhone photography https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/2/my-new-favorite-iphone-app-for-the-darkroom Sat, 29 Feb 2020 06:28:00 GMT
How To Clear Your Platinum & Palladium Prints Effectively & Cheaply Using a 100 Year Old Process https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/2/how-to-clear-your-platinum-palladium-prints-effectively-cheaply How To Clear Your Platinum & Palladium Prints Effectively & Cheaply by Tim LaytonHow To Clear Your Platinum & Palladium Prints Effectively & Cheaply by Tim Layton After you develop your platinum or platinum and palladium print, you need to be very careful to clear the print before doing the final archival wash.

The method that I am going to share with you today is a time-tested proven process that has been used by photographers since the late 19th century and so we know it works. 

The best part is that the chemicals for this method are easy to find, inexpensive, and very easy to use.  

I have a detailed step-by-step quick start guide that includes everything that you need to know for making beautiful platinum and palladium prints.  

Developing a Platinum & Palladium Print by Tim Layton

HOW TO CLEAR YOUR PLATINUM/PALLADIUM PRINTS

Warming Platinum developer by Tim LaytonWarming Platinum developer by Tim Layton All you need is a supply of citric acid to make a 3% solution.  To make a 3% citric acid solution, simply weight out 30g for every 1000ml of distilled water. You can use your local tap water to clear your prints, but I don't and you have to make that call for yourself.  I sell my platinum prints to collectors all over the world and I have never had a single print show any signs of issue. 

If you don't have a proper scale, then 30g is equal to about 2 tablespoons.

Citric acid easy dissolves in water, so you won't have any issue getting to to dissolve correctly.  I personally put about 500ml of distilled water in a beaker on my magnetic stirrer.  Before I add the 500ml of water, I place the magnetic bar in the bottom and then pour the water in the beaker.  Next, I turn on the magnetic stirrer and then I add the 30g (2 tbsp) of dry citric acid.  After that is complete, I add the remaining 500ml of distilled water and let everything mix for a couple of minutes.  I pour the mixed solution in my tray.  

I use a three tray clearing bath protocol after development, so I mix up three 1 liter batch of this for my 8x10 prints that I place on 11x14 paper. 

If you want to use an easier mixing method, you can must place the 30g (2 tbsp) of citric acid in each of your three trays and add the 1000ml of water and use something like a plastic spoon to stir it around until it dissolves.  I make silver gelatin emulsion, so I have all the proper lab equipment at my disposal, so I use it, but it isn't necessary.

STEP BY STEP PROCESS FOR CLEARING

Platinum Printing by Tim LaytonPlatinum Printing by Tim Layton STEP 1: Place your developer print in the 1st clearing bath and agitate it continuously for at least 5 minutes.

STEP 2: Move your print to the 2nd clearing bath and continuously agitate for another 5 or more minutes. 

STEP 3: Move your print to the 3rd clearing bath and continuously agitate for another 5 or more minutes.

And that is all there is to it.  Now, I place the cleared print in a fresh tray of distilled water for about 5 or more minutes before moving to my archival washer for one hour.  

After clearing a few prints, you will begin to notice your first clearing bath will start to become a light yellow color. This is all perfectly normal and what should happen.  You don't want this yellow color to appear in your second and especially not in your third bath. 

Once my second bath starts to show the first signs of yellow, I empty my first tray and rinse it out.  Then I pour the second bath into the first tray.  Then, I pour my third bath into the empty second tray.  Now, I take that empty tray and mix up a fresh clearing bath as noted above and make that my third bath.  I keep this process going for as long as I am working and making prints for each session. 

This method has been proven to be effective since the late 19th century, so don't think you need to spend money on more expensive chemicals.  You just need to follow the protocol as described above and you will never have an issue.  If you become lazy and don't change out your clearing baths as described above, then of course issues can arise down the road with your prints. 

If you have limited space, or you are making large prints and can only spare the room for one tray, you can just mix up three jugs of citric acid solution as described above and use them with the single tray. 

As a final check after your third clearing bath, look at your highlights and make sure they are clear and paper white without any type of discoloration that would typically be yellow in nature. 

Wild Horses of Missouri Platinum Print "The Nomads" by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri Platinum Print "The Nomads" by Tim Layton Wild Horses of Missouri Platinum Print "Heavy Burden" by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri Platinum Print "Heavy Burden" by Tim Layton

Video Workshops For Analog Photographers

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world. 

Buy Your Film, Darkroom, and Photography Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography darkroom fine art large format photography Platinum Platinum & Palladium Platinum/Palladium https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/2/how-to-clear-your-platinum-palladium-prints-effectively-cheaply Fri, 28 Feb 2020 14:23:31 GMT
Wild Horse Diary: Feb. 9, 2020 - How 1 Small Deer Can Alarm an Entire Herd of Wild Horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/2/wild-horse-diary-how-1-small-deer-can How 1 Small Deer Can Alarm an Entire Herd of Wild Horses by Tim LaytonHow 1 Small Deer Can Alarm an Entire Herd of Wild Horses by Tim Layton In my Wild Horse Diary update today, I am going to share an amazing experience that I had on February 9, 2020 with the Shawnee herd. 

If you want to learn about the back story of the wild horses, you can read about them and then continue with the article.  If you want to know more about each of the herds and where to find them, you can read about that on my "Where To Find The Wild Horses of Missouri" resource guide.

Lesa and I decided to make our rounds early on Sunday morning to some of the normal places where the Broadfoot, Round Spring, and Shawnee herds are known to be and just enjoy whatever the day held. 

First, I will share a brief update for each of the locations I visited and then I will provide details about an amazing experience with the Shawnee herd.  Hang on to the end of the article because I know you will enjoy the story.

Shawnee Creek Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim LaytonShawnee Creek Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton I get a lot of questions about what equipment I use to photograph the wild horses, so I will include that information for you here in case it is of interest to you. 

First, I take a bold and different approach as compared to the vast majority of wildlife photographers today.  I use black and white film versus the latest digital cameras.  If you want to know more about why I made this decision, you can read about that in this brief article.

Based on available light, I use one of two films, Kodak Tri-X or Ilford FP4+.  My primary film for photographing the wild horses is Kodak Tri-X.  I use Tri-X because of its incredibly flexible exposure latitude and its contrasty nature that works very well with the white horses. I rate Tri-X anywhere between EI 250 to EI 1600, based on available light and my intended look and feeling of my platinum prints.  I have thoroughly and formally tested my film and developer combinations so I know exactly what types of images are possible with each film.  I develop both films in a custom self-mixed version of Kodak D-76 1:1 in my Jobo CPP-3 processor.

Wild Horses of Missouri Platinum Print "The Nomads" by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri Platinum Print "The Nomads" by Tim Layton When there is enough available light, I like to use Ilford FP4+ and also when I want a much different look and feeling to my platinum prints that I can't get with Kodak Tri-X.

At a high level, I would characterize my platinum prints made with Tri-X as emotional and heavy images that are intended to tug at your heartstrings.  The print to the left of this paragraph, "The Nomads", was made with Tri-X rated at EI 1600 and developed in D-76 1:1.  The platinum print is wet in the clearing tray, so it isn't very easy to see the film grain in this iPhone snapshot, but I hope the emotion comes through.  

Wild Horses of Missouri Platinum Print "Heavy Burden" by Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri Platinum Print "Heavy Burden" by Tim Layton My platinum prints made with FP4+ have a cleaner and lighter feeling to them. The platinum print, "Heavy Burden" to the left of this paragraph should look different to your eye as compared to "The Nomads" above. It has a much cleaner feel to it and this is what I wanted for this print. 

I use all of this to my creative advantage while I am out in the field.  Time and experience help craft and shape the creative process for me and this is one of the main reasons why I continue to use black and white film when everyone has abandoned ship.  I continue to use the same camera (Nikon F6) with the same film and developers as described above and I have no plan of ever-changing this combination.  My three most used lenses for the Nikon F6 are the 70-200 F2.8, 300mm F2.8, and the 600mm F4.  My 600mm F4 lens is the older F/4 G ED VR lens that will likely continue to be relevant for another 10 or more years.  I've had it for over 5 years already.  

BROADFOOT HERD

Broadfoot - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim LaytonBroadfoot - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton We started by making the trip out to Broadfoot first because we haven't seen this herd in a while.  We were excited and hopeful that we could at least see them today. 

This herd is a lot more aware of people and their surroundings than the Shawnee herd.  I frequently can find signs of them, but more often than not, they are either deep in the woods or leave the area as soon as they sense people. 

Often times the moment they sense or see a human being, they are either moving away from you or flat out running away.  It makes it very challenging to photograph them, so when you do get that opportunity, it is always very special.  

Today was a normal winter day with the grazing fields close-cut and very little grass as you can see in the image above.  The river was up much more than I expected, and there were no fresh tracks down by the river.  While it has been a mild winter overall, the horses don't tend to cross the river unless they absolutely need to do so.  As you can see from the simple snapshots in this section, Broadfoot was very quiet and peaceful and still in its winter state. 

GRASSY CREEK - ROUND SPRING HERD

Broadfoot - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim LaytonBroadfoot - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton After leaving Broadfoot we traveled north to head over to Grassy Creek.  We've had a lot of great experiences at the Grassy Creek location over the years and we were hopeful that we would find the herd here today.

At this time, it is believed the wild horses in this area are a smaller band that formed from the larger Round Spring Herd.  While there are no rules in the naming convention, most of the locals still refer to the wild horses at Grassy Creek as the Round Spring Herd.  

Grassy Creek is a peaceful location tucked deep in the Ozark's with a lot of hilly terrain and a clean river running through the area. The water is clean and the terrain is very rugged and these horses are well adapted to the environment. 

It is a perfect habitat for wild horses and I can understand why they frequent this area.  I have hiked a lot of the area near Grassy Creek and words cannot fully relate how challenging it is to simply walk and navigate the terrain.  I have personally watched the horses move through the terrain with seemingly no effort and with great ease.  We spotted signs of the horses in some of the areas I know to look, but we didn't find them, so we headed southeast towards Shawnee Creek.  

SHAWNEE CREEK - SHAWNEE CREEK HERD

Broadfoot - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim LaytonBroadfoot - Wild Horses of Missouri by Tim Layton After leaving Grassy Creek, we headed southwest towards Shawnee Creek with a hopeful heart that we would see this herd today. 

While we never have the expectation of finding the horses during every outing, it is always a delight when we do. 

When we arrived at Shawnee Creek, we spotted four of the horses near the edge of a field that is about 100 yards from Jack's Fork River.  The area around the river is heavily wooded and I frequently find the horses in the woods.

As you can see in the photo above, four of the horses were grazing near the edge of the field and the rest of the herd was in the woods, but not too far from the perimeter of the field. 

I was slowly working my way around the perimeter of the woods and I noticed a small little doe (female deer).  She was working her way down the field towards the horses.  Then, she decided to cut down by the river and I lost sight of her.  I thought that was the end of the deer and I went back to my plan of working the perimeter of the woods so I could get closer to the horses.  

Then, all of a sudden, I saw the deer come up over the river bank and run directly towards the four horses in the field.  I knew instantly this was going to get interesting.  

I share the events that happened next along with the corresponding photos in the section below. 

Wild Horses of Missouri with Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri with Tim Layton

You can see in this photo directly above that the deer was running full out near one of the mares.  The mare immediately set off an alarm to the rest of the herd and started to run out of the area. 

Wild Horses of Missouri with Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri with Tim Layton

Within the matter of a few seconds, the boss mare started charging the deer as you can see in the photograph above. All of this unfolded in a matter of just a few seconds.  

While the boss mare was charging the deer, she signaled the rest of the herd and within a couple of seconds, help arrived from the woods.  I think you are going to be surprised by the help she received, so continue reading to learn about this interesting turn of events.

Wild Horses of Missouri with Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri with Tim Layton

As you can see in this image, the boss mare had closed the gap between her and the deer within just a few moments.  It was incredible to watch her work so quickly and protect her family.

You may be wondering where the lead stallion was during all of this? 

He remained in the woods with a couple of the other mares from the herd and he didn't so much as move a step.  I glanced over to see him and he was literally watching all of this unfold.  

Wild Horses of Missouri with Tim LaytonWild Horses of Missouri with Tim Layton

If you notice in the final image above there is a young brown yearling colt and the boss mare is leading the herd ensuring the threat has left the area.  I photographed this young colt as a new foal last year right after he was born. 

It was an amazing experience to see how much he had matured in less than a year. In fact, as soon as the boss mare signaled, he was the first and only horse the exited the woods and entered the field where the drama was happening.  Referring to the image above, you can see he is nearly as big as his mother now. 

It was truly an amazing experience and one that will likely never happen again in my lifetime.  It all happened so quickly and I am still processing everything that happened. 

It was an amazing level of coordination and teamwork that seems to be programmed into the horse's genetics.  I was most surprised that the stallion remained still while the boss mare handled the entire situation.

Video Workshops For Analog Photographers

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop Platinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video WorkshopPlatinum & Palladium Printmaking with Vellum Video Workshop

Read Testimonials from photographers and collectors from around the world. 

Buy Your Film, Darkroom, and Photography Gear at No Additional Cost To You From B&H Photo

COLOR FILMS, DEVELOPERS, DARKROOM GEAR

Fujichrome Provia 100F - Fujichrome Velvia 100 - Fujichrome Velvia 50 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400  - Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujicolor Pro 400H - Fujicolor Crystal Archive Silver Gelatin RA4 Paper - RA-4 Color Print Processing Developer & Processing Chemicals - Color Darkroom Enlargers 

ILFORD B&W FILMS & DEVELOPERS

Ilford HP5 PlusIlford FP4 Plus - Ilford Delta 100 - Ilford Delta 400 - Ilford Delta 3200 - Ilford Pan F Plus - Ilford XP2 Super - Ilford SFX - Ilford ID-11 - Ilford DD-X - Ilford Microphen

KODAK B&W FILM DEVELOPERS

Kodak Tri-X - Kodak T-Max 100 - Kodak T-Max 400 - Kodak Portra 160 - Kodak Portra 400 - Kodak Ektar 100 - Kodak P-3200 - Kodak Ektachrome - Kodak D-76 - Kodak XTOL - Kodak HC-110

DARKROOM SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
Jobo CPP-3 processer - Ilford RC Pearl Paper - Ilford RC Glossy Paper - Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper - Ilford Stop Bath - Ilford Rapid Fixer - Neutral FixerKodak Photo-Flo - Hypo Clearing Agent - Darkroom Trays - Chemical Storage Jugs - Nitrile Gloves - Film Archival Storage Sleeves - Archival Storage Binder - Archival Print Storage Boxes

Note: I participate in affiliate programs where I earn a small commission on some select products that I provide links for on my website at www.timlaytonfineart.com. When you use these links, I earn a small commission and there is no additional charge to you.

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(Tim Layton Fine Art) Diary Ozarks Shannon County Wild Horses https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/2/wild-horse-diary-how-1-small-deer-can Sat, 15 Feb 2020 03:39:25 GMT
How To Make a Simple B&W Contact Printing Setup For Darkroom Printing https://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2020/2/how-to-make-a-simple-b-w-contact-printing-setup-for-darkroom-printing How To Make a Simple B&W Contact Printing Setup For Darkroom Printing by Tim LaytonHow To Make a Simple B&W Contact Printing Setup For Darkroom Printing by Tim Layton In this article today, I am going to show you how simple it is to make a black and white contact printing setup that you can use in a spare room, bathroom, or any small space that can be made temporarily dark.  

Photography can be as simple and pure as you want it to be and that is one of the reasons why I love large format black and white photography so much.  All I need is my camera, some sheet film, and a very basic light source to make elegant and beautiful prints.  If Edward Weston could use his simple setup for his entire life, surely we can follow in his footsteps and enjoy making some contact prints too.  

If you would like to be able to make some black and white silver gelatin contact prints, but you are thinking you don't have an enlarger or the space to do it, I am going to show you how simple and elegant it can be to make contact prints.

Sunflower - Large Format B&W Silver Gelatin Contact Print by Tim LaytonSunflower - Large Format B&W Silver Gelatin Contact Print by Tim Layton I personally prefer to make 8x10 contact prints, but I also love making smaller 5x7, 4x5, and even 4x10 and 6x17 panoramic silver gelatin contact prints from my negatives too.

I use this same simple setup to make my proper proofs on RC paper to determine if I want to invest the time and effort of making an archival fiber print. I store the RC proper proof along with the negative in the archival binder. 

I will list everything that I use to make this simple B&W Contact Printing Setup so you can duplicate or use it as inspiration.

Large Format B&W Silver Gelatin Contact Print by Tim LaytonLarge Format B&W Silver Gelatin Contact Print by Tim Layton Large Format B&W Silver Gelatin Contact Print by Tim LaytonLarge Format B&W Silver Gelatin Contact Print by Tim Layton Large Format B&W Silver Gelatin Contact Print by Tim LaytonLarge Format B&W Silver Gelatin Contact Print by Tim Layton Large Format B&W Silver Gelatin Contact Print by Tim LaytonLarge Format B&W Silver Gelatin Contact Print by Tim Layton

Over the years I have heard from hundreds of photographers around the world that say they would love to be able to still make real silver gelatin prints, but they just don't have room for a darkroom anymore, so they scan their film and make inkjet prints. While there is nothing wrong with making any type of print, we all know that contact prints are very special and for good reason.  

Rocky Creek Waterfall at Klepzig Mill large format B&W contact print by Tim LaytonRocky Creek Waterfall at Klepzig Mill large format B&W contact print by Tim Layton While it can be very easy to scan your film and making any number of digital-based outputs, there is nothing like a large format contact print.  

I am going to will walk you through how you can build a simple solution for making silver gelatin contact prints in this article, so you won't have any more excuses not to do it... :) 

Even if you enjoy both digital and analog photography, that is even more reason to embrace a true analog workflow by making some stellar black and white contact prints.  

Just like the famous Edward Weston 8x10 contact prints, you only really need a simple light source and a way to keep your negative flat and tightly sandwiched to your desired silver gelatin paper. Of course, you will probably want some type of safelight to help you see what you are doing while working and I personally recommend some Ilford Multigrade Variable Contrast Filters because modern darkroom paper is no longer graded like it was back in the days of Weston and Adams. 

In this section, I will list the basic components that I used to make my personal DIY B&W Silver Gelatin Contact Printing setup and then share my thoughts about some of the important details. 

Simple B&W Contact Printing Light Source with Ilford Variable Contrast Filter by Tim LaytonSimple B&W Contact Printing Light Source with Ilford Variable Contrast Filter by Tim Layton

You need some way to mount or place your light/filter source above your contact printing frame.  I already own a Beseler Copy Stand so that is what I use.  I have previously made a stand out of white artboard and also out of som one inch PVC pipe. I will show you those pictures below so you can see that you don't need an expensive copy stand or even an enlarger to make beautiful black and white contact prints. Refer to the images below of some more of my DIY contact printing solutions. 

Simple B&W Contact Printing Light Source with Ilford Variable Contrast Filter by Tim LaytonSimple B&W Contact Printing Light Source with Ilford Variable Contrast Filter by Tim Layton

This DIY contact printing setup is made out of some white artboard that I got from the hobby store.

PVC DIY B&W Contact Printing Stand.PVC DIY B&W Contact Printing Stand.

This DIY contact printing setup is made out of PVC pipe from Home Depot to mimic my more expensive and less transportable Beseler Copy Stand.  I take this PVC copy stand on the road with me to make contact prints in my hotel room. 

And some of the printmaking supplies include:

  • 8x10 Darkroom Processing Trays (available from B&H and many other places)
  • Nitrile Gloves - I recommend you should protect your hands and skin 
  • Paper Developer - Mix your own or use a commercial formula like Dektol, Ilford Multigrade, etc.
  • Stop Bath - I recommend an eco-friendly formula or Eco-Pro which is a commercial solution. 
  • Fixer - I recommend an eco-friendly formula or Eco-Pro which is a commercial solution. 
  • Hypo Clear - I recommend an eco-friendly formula or Eco-Pro which is a commercial solution. 
  • Kodak Rapid Selenium Toner - Used to make your fiber prints archival quality and improved tonal qualities.
  • Distilled water - I always use distilled water to mix my developer and to mix my Selenium Toner. Distilled water is typically always available at any grocery store. 

B&W Contact Printing Setup by Tim LaytonB&W Contact Printing Setup by Tim Layton

If you want to know my method for making black and white silver gelatin contact prints, I have several articles that I have written on this topic that I will list below for you.

How To Make Proper Proofs in the Darkroom

How To Determine Base Exposure For Contact Prints in the Darkroom

How To Make Contact Prints in the Darkroom - Step by Step

Video Workshops For Analog Photographers

Tim Layton Fine Art All Access Pass B&W Darkroom Photography Video WorkshopB&W Darkroom Photography Video Workshop Large Format Photography Video Workshop SeriesLarge Format Photography Video Workshop Series B&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video WorkshopB&W Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop Large Format B&W Film Testing Video WorkshopLarge Format B&W Film Testing Video Workshop Large Format Paper Negative Video WorkshopLarge Format Paper Negative Video Workshop DIY UV Printer Design & Build Video WorkshopDIY UV Printer Design & Build Video Workshop