Why Trees Matter

November 02, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

First AP from Plate #2A from Ortho NegativeFirst AP from Plate #2A from Ortho Negative I view photography as a tool to help me accomplish two main goals.  My primary goal is to raise awareness about the challenging issues related to nature and its relationship to humanity and why nature matters in the modern technology-focused world.  

My secondary goal is to inspire people to connect with nature and get involved in their local communities.  I believe that people protect what they love.  If we can help people understand the issues, then many of the right actions will be taken because the vast majority of people care about things that matter.    

If we can get people connected to nature in a positive and meaningful way, I believe that we have a better chance of protecting and conserving our natural resources for ourselves and future generations.  

I share exclusive articles and information like this with my newsletter subscribers.

My passion areas include trees, flowers, and the vast landscapes in national parks. There is no world for humans without trees, flowers, and habitats for wildlife. Trees, flowers, and wildlife are more critical to humanities long-term survival than most people realize.  In the section below, I share some key reasons why trees are important.  

WHY ARE TREES IMPORTANT?

  • Trees combat climate change - Excess carbon dioxide (CO2) caused by many factors is a building up in our atmosphere and contributing to climate change. Trees absorb CO2, removing and storing the carbon while releasing the oxygen back into the air. In one year, an acre of mature trees absorbs the amount of CO2 produced when you drive your car 26,000 miles.
  • Trees provide oxygen - In one year an acre of mature trees can provide enough oxygen for 18 people.
  • Trees conserve energy - Three trees placed strategically around a single-family home can cut summer air conditioning needs by up to 50 percent. By reducing the energy demand for cooling our houses, we reduce carbon dioxide and other pollution emissions from power plants.
  • Trees save water - Shade from trees slows water evaporation from thirsty lawns. Most newly planted trees need only fifteen gallons of water a week. As trees transpire, they increase atmospheric moisture.
  • Trees help prevent water pollution - Trees reduce runoff by breaking rainfall thus allowing the water to flow down the trunk and into the earth below the tree. This prevents stormwater from carrying pollutants to the ocean. When mulched, trees act like a sponge that filters this water naturally and uses it to recharge groundwater supplies.
  • Trees provide food - An apple tree can yield up to 15-20 bushels of fruit per year and can be planted on the tiniest urban lot. Aside from fruit for humans, trees provide food for birds and wildlife.
  • Trees heal - Studies have shown that patients with views of trees out their windows heal faster and with less complications. Children with ADHD show fewer symptoms when they have access to nature. Exposure to trees and nature aids concentration by reducing mental fatigue.
  • Trees provide heat - In suburban and rural areas, trees can be selectively harvested for fuel and craft wood.
  • Trees help prevent soil erosion - On hillsides or stream slopes, trees slow runoff and hold soil in place.
  • Trees mark the seasons - Is it winter, spring, summer or fall? Look at the trees.

-Tim Layton 

The Darkroom Underground is your analog photography magazine produced on a quarterly basis serving photographers, artists, collectors, and readers around the world. Publications are released on Jan 1st, Apr. 1st, July 1st, and Oct. 1st.  The Darkroom Underground publishes a balance of technical and creative articles in every issue along with featured photographers and their portfolios. We are pleased to offer editorial from internationally recognized photographers and writers and also publish articles and portfolios from our readers. 

If you like this type of article then you will probably enjoy my free darkroom newsletter and my darkroom and large format training materials (Video Workshops, Quick Reference Cards, eBooks)

Tim Layton
B&W Fine Art Analog Photography
Darkroom Underground Magazine: www.darkroomunderground.com
Darkroom & Large Format Training: www.timlaytonfineart.com/workshops
© Tim Layton Sr. | All Rights Reserved

 


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