Why Flowers Are Important

November 03, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

I view photography as a tool to help me accomplish two main goals.  My primary goal is to raise awareness about the challenging issues related to nature and its relationship to humanity and why nature matters in the modern technology-focused world.  

My secondary goal is to inspire people to connect with nature and get involved in their local communities.  I believe that people protect what they love.  If we can help people understand the issues, then many of the right actions will be taken because the vast majority of people care about things that matter.    

If we can get people connected to nature in a positive and meaningful way, I believe that we have a better chance of protecting and conserving our natural resources for ourselves and future generations.  

I share exclusive articles and information like this with my newsletter subscribers.

My passion areas include trees, flowers, and the vast landscapes in national parks. There is no world for humans without trees, flowers, and habitats for wildlife. Trees, flowers, and wildlife are more critical to humanities long-term survival than most people realize.  In the section below, I share some key reasons why flowers are important and nice to have in our personal living spaces.  

WHY ARE FLOWERS IMPORTANT?

  • Flowers' importance in nature is everywhere-they can feed insects, birds, animals and humans; provide natural medicines for humans and some animals; and aid in a plant's reproduction by enticing outside pollinators. Without flowers, plants would merely be green, and the world would be a duller place.
  • Virtually all of the world’s seed plants need to be pollinated. This is just as true for cone-bearing plants, such as pine trees, as for the more colorful and familiar flowering plants. Pollen, looking like insignificant yellow dust, bears a plant’s male sex cells and is a vital link in the reproductive cycle.
  • With adequate pollination, wildflowers:
    • - Reproduce and produce enough seeds for dispersal and propagation
    • - Maintain genetic diversity within a population
    • - Develop adequate fruits to entice seed dispersers
  • Pollination is not just fascinating natural history. It is an essential ecological survival function. Without pollinators, the human race and all of earth’s terrestrial ecosystems would not survive. Of the 1,400 crop plants grown around the world, i.e., those that produce all of our food and plant-based industrial products, almost 80% require pollination by animals. Visits from bees and other pollinators also result in larger, more flavorful fruits and higher crop yields. In the United States alone, pollination of agricultural crops is valued at 10 billion dollars annually. Globally, pollination services are likely worth more than 3 trillion dollars.
  • Flowers offer more to the planet than merely natural artwork and beauty. 
  • Flowers are essential to removing carbon dioxide and toxins in the air. 
  • Flowers feed the honeybee population that’s responsible for promulgating food crops. 
  • To most people however, flowers carry enormous symbolism, provide soothing sympathy and are an integral part of many of life’s ceremonies.
  • Many flowers are used for medicinal purposes. 
  • Beautiful flowers kept in hospital rooms can reduce the stress of patients and improve their recovery.
  • Flowers are helpful because they represent higher planes of consciousness.
  • Flowers play a critical role for bees that produce honey as a byproduct of their work.
  • Planting flowers is one main way that you can attract beneficial insects to your garden.  These not only include the pollinators, but also the ones that eat other harmful bugs.  

Scroll down to the bottom of this article and click on the "Add comment" button and say "Hi" and introduce yourself.  Let me know what part of the world you currently live in.  

-Tim Layton 

The Darkroom Underground is your analog photography magazine produced on a quarterly basis serving photographers, artists, collectors, and readers around the world. Publications are released on Jan 1st, Apr. 1st, July 1st, and Oct. 1st.  The Darkroom Underground publishes a balance of technical and creative articles in every issue along with featured photographers and their portfolios. We are pleased to offer editorial from internationally recognized photographers and writers and also publish articles and portfolios from our readers. 

If you like this type of article then you will probably enjoy my free darkroom newsletter and my darkroom and large format training materials (Video Workshops, Quick Reference Cards, eBooks)

Tim Layton
B&W Fine Art Analog Photography
Darkroom Underground Magazine: www.darkroomunderground.com
Darkroom & Large Format Training: www.timlaytonfineart.com/workshops
© Tim Layton Sr. | All Rights Reserved

 


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