Tim Layton Fine Art: Blog http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog en-us (C) Tim Layton & Associates | All Rights Reserved tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) Sat, 21 Apr 2018 18:14:00 GMT Sat, 21 Apr 2018 18:14:00 GMT http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/img/s/v-5/u131224912-o510457233-50.jpg Tim Layton Fine Art: Blog http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog 80 120 4/21/18 - Darkroom Underground Analog Photography News Update http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/4/21/18-darkroom-underground-analog-news-update DARKROOM UNDERGROND ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY NEWS UDPATE

April 21, 2018 by Tim Layton

Your source for analog photography information and news.  Visit the main news page for previous updates.  

In this news update today, I share 3 updates with you that feature large format photographers.  If you see some news that you think other analog photographers would enjoy, send me a note and let me know so that I can include it in a future update.  

If you are reading this update, you may be interested in my new large format video workshop series.  

Jade Doskow's "Lost Utopias" Opened on April 20th at the Front Room Gallery in New York
Using long exposure photography techniques with her large-format 4x5 Arca-Swiss film camera, Doskow has created contrasting images of stillness, projected by the built environment, juxtaposing smears of motion attributed to people, transportation, and the natural environment. 

[More information]

Legendary film Photographer Christopher Burkett is in a Race Against Time to Finalize his Lasting Legacy

Large-format film photographer Christopher Burkett was born in 1951 and has been photographing since 1975. Today, he almost exclusively photographs using 8 x 10" color transparencies. However, the available materials with which Burkett can work is dwindling and production on his materials has stopped. Burkett is in a race against time.

Burkett considers the 8 x 10 format to offer the ultimate in image quality.

"I'm still figuring out how many of different images I want to print as kind of a legacy of my work. There are many times I'm printing images now in certain sizes and I know that's the last time I'm going to print those in that size." Burkett has a deeply emotional connection to his work and when the his supplies are depleted, he will end his photographic career.

[More information]

Art Cologne Opens with Modern Art Mix of Established, Emerging Galleries

Art Cologne, the world’s oldest international art galleries fair, opened this Thursday for its 52nd edition showcasing a mixture of 20th and 21st century art.  According to Germany’s prestigious Central Archive of the International Art Trade (ZADIK), Art Cologne has been highly influential “not only in terms of the significant developments in the history of the national and international art trade but also the history of art as a whole.”

Heavy-weight names such as film director Wim Wenders’ large format photography and sculptures by Eduardo Paolozzi, Alberto Giacometti, Duane Hanson’s startling and hyper realistic Window Washer (1984) or Chris Burden’s Sex Tower (1986), an erect gilded monument to the coital union, are also present at the fair.

[More information]

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Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white film darkroom photography film photography large format photography medium format photography photography http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/4/21/18-darkroom-underground-analog-news-update Sat, 21 Apr 2018 18:10:04 GMT
May 2018 Darkroom Underground Fine Art Print - Rocky Creek Shut-ins http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/may-2018-darkroom-underground-fine-art-print-rocky-creek-shut-ins I am excited to share the May 2018 Darkroom Underground Fine Art Print of Rocky Creek Shut-ins located in the Missouri Ozark Mountains.  This fine art print is an exclusive collectible print for members only and not available anywhere else.  For more information on the Darkroom Underground Fine Art Print Club Membership and all the benefits in addition to the handmade print, visit the membership main page for details. (Hint... you get a special 50% discount on my entire training library, access to a private video of me making the print, and a certificate of authenticity for your exclusive print).  

I made the silver gelatin contact print using a 5x7 large format FP4+ black and white film negative that was developed in Pyrocat HD using my DIY development tubes.  I used my split grade method for this print to achieve the full range of tones that I envisioned. 

I hope that you enjoy the video, and if you have any questions or comments, you can contact me at any time. 

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Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white fine art print darkroom print large format mill mountains ozarks silver gelatin waterfall http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/may-2018-darkroom-underground-fine-art-print-rocky-creek-shut-ins Sat, 21 Apr 2018 12:28:48 GMT
Announcing The Darkroom Underground Fine Art Print Club http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/announcing-the-darkroom-underground-fine-art-print-club Darkroom Underground Fine Art Print Club

The Darkroom Underground Fine Art Print Club is an exciting opportunity to collect exclusive artist original handmade darkroom prints at an incredibly affordable price of only $20 per month with an annual membership.  

As a member you also receive a 50% discount on Tim Layton's complete library of darkroom and large format photography training resources

Join today and start receiving your exclusive hand made darkroom prints and take advantage of your member benefits.

MEMBER BENEFITS

  • Receive an artist original exclusive analog darkroom print four times per year (Feb, May, Aug, Nov).  
  • Exclusive 50% members only discount on Tim’s library of video workshops and eBooks.  
  • Access to behind the scenes video of Tim making each print in the darkroom and he shares the valuable technical details and techniques of how he created the print to help you learn and evolve your own darkroom and analog photography skills.  
  • A certificate of authenticity signed by Tim validating your fine art print as an original piece of art.

Note: for shipments outside of the USA, I will have to determine the international shipping rates for you and then send you an invoice.  

I release new prints in February, May, August, November so that you receive your print one month after the release of the Darkroom Underground Magazine. By coordinating this way, you get the magazine four times a year in Jan, April, July, and October, and your prints one month later in February, May, August, and November. 

My handmade darkroom prints are created one at a time by hand in the darkroom, completely devoid of computers and technology.  When you receive your print from me, you know it was hand made by me in the darkroom, one at a time.    

In our modern technology-driven world where almost nothing is created by hand any longer, it is a rare treat to receive your exclusive darkroom print knowing that Tim personally made it for you with film, paper, light, and darkroom chemicals.

Print types could include silver gelatin darkroom prints, platinum/palladium, or color darkroom prints.  These special prints are for members only, not available for sale anywhere else. You must be a DU Print Club Member in order to receive these prints because they are not sold anywhere else.  

Black and white prints are created with Ilford MGIV RC paper, Color chromogenic prints are printed on Fujifilm Crystal Archive Lustre paper, and the platinum/palladium prints are created on Hahnemühle Platinum Rag paper.     

Join today and start receiving your new prints and take advantage of your exclusive member benefits. When you subscribe, you will get the most current print and then you will start receiving your new prints as they are released every February, May, August, and November.

FINE ART ANALOG DARKROOM PRINTS

“I don’t take the easy path when it comes to my photography.  Even though it is possibly easier to capture digital images and print them via a computer, I continue to keep the art of darkroom photography alive because I believe it is special, increasingly unique, and valuable.  Analog photography continues to be valued by collectors from around the world and it will in the future because it is a proven art form that people seek to enjoy and collect.  I enjoy every step in the analog photography process from exposing and developing the film to making the handmade prints in the darkroom using film, paper, and light. I feel connected to every print and by doing this work I feel that I am bringing something positive into the world." -Tim Layton 

Join today and start receiving your new prints and take advantage of your exclusive member benefits. When you subscribe, you will get the most current print and then you will start receiving your new prints as they are released every February, May, August, and November.

WHAT ARE PEOPLE SAYING ABOUT TIM'S PRINTS?

“I love my artwork from Tim because they are all beautiful and graceful fine art. Aesthetically, they are a pleasure to behold. But for me, so much more of what I enjoy is the experience and the journey that Tim shares.  And the uplifting message that comes through so clearly.  It’s as if I am transported there with him to feel and to be part of the natural beauty he captures.  Tim's artwork makes the noise of the modern world be quiet. I am grateful for the positive and uplifting impact that Tim’s art has on me and all of my friends and family.” -Sally D., Michigan 

“I fell in love with Tim's photography the first moment I saw one of his incredible photographs. Tim has a God-given ability to capture a scene in such a way that one can actually imagine themselves there in that moment. His photos seem to be alive to the point that one can feel the rush of the water, smell the scents of the lovely flowers, breathe in the joy of such a wonderfully, beautiful place. Thank you for sharing your special talent Tim.” -Nancy, Alabama 

“Tim, you are an amazing artist and I love everything you create!! Keep sharing with us, please! Thanks Tim!! -Karen, Oregon

“One word that I immediately think of when I see Tim's photographs is inspiring….his love of the beauty of nature is an inspiration to me.” -Randy, Florida

“I love Tim’s photography, and I look forward to receiving my new print every month.  I've been many places through Tim’s artwork and I have seen many thing's I would never be able to see in person. Tim’s artwork makes my day every month when it arrives.” -Barbara, Missouri  

Join today and start receiving your new prints and take advantage of your exclusive member benefits. When you subscribe, you will get the most current print and then you will start receiving your new prints as they are released every February, May, August, and November. 

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/announcing-the-darkroom-underground-fine-art-print-club Sat, 21 Apr 2018 04:10:32 GMT
Fuji GX617 and FP4+ in Rodinal at Rocky Creek Shut-ins (Movie 1 of 3) - In The Field http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/fuji-gx617-and-fp4-in-rodinal-at-rocky-creek-shut-ins-movie-1-of-3-in-the-field In a three-part series, I take you on a journey to Rocky Creek Shut-ins at Klepzig Mill deep in the Ozark Mountains where 19th century pioneers once lived and made a living using these fresh spring waters.  

In this first video, I take you to Rocky Creek so that you can enjoy the beauty of this very special place as I photographed it with my panoramic Fuji GX617 camera.  

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I used Ilford FP4+ and I semi-stand developed the film with Rodinal for an incredibly beautiful negative that has full tonality from glistening highlights in the waterfalls to open shadows.  I think you will enjoy this three-part series as I take you in the field with me in video one, then into the darkroom to develop the film where I share my entire process with you of how I develop the film using the semi-stand method using Rodinal, and in video three, I make a split-grade silver gelatin darkroom print.  

I am excited to share my new large format video workshop series with you.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) black and white film contact print darkroom print fp4+" fuji gx617 ilford ozarks panoramic silver gelatin darkroom print waterfall http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/fuji-gx617-and-fp4-in-rodinal-at-rocky-creek-shut-ins-movie-1-of-3-in-the-field Thu, 19 Apr 2018 13:14:35 GMT
DIY Large Format Contact Printing Setup http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/diy-large-format-contact-printing-setup In this article and video today, I share how to make a DIY large format contact printing setup in less than an hour.  The video is at the bottom of the article.  

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One of the things that I love about large format is the ability to make beautiful contact prints without the need for any type of modern technology.  I always think about the simplicity of Edward Weston's setup and how he focused on creating versus complicating his setup and processes.  A large format silver gelatin contact print is like a jewel that stands out in the crowd in my opinion.  

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Of all the types of prints that I make, I am most proud of a contact print because there is no where to hide from mistakes, anywhere in the process.  You composition has to be exactly what you envisioned or the print doesn't work.  You have to nail your exposure and development to produce a good negative that is going to print good. And, you have to be able to express your creative vision in the print via your darkroom skills.  I love all of this because you don't need any type of modern technology or computer equipment to make high quality fine art prints.  I think that is important because we live in a fast-paced technology oriented world today and it is refreshing to unplug from all of the modern life pressures and just make some very simple, but beautiful and elegant fine art prints by hand in the darkroom with very simple methods.  Don't mistake simplicity for lack of value or a print that lacks emotional impact.  

You may like my Large Format Contact Printing Quick Reference Cards or my new Large Format Video Workshop Series.  I also have an eBook that walks you through every step in the process to make beautiful split grade silver gelatin darkroom prints.  

DIY LARGE FORMAT CONTACT PRINTING DESIGN & SETUP

DIY Large Format Contact Printing SetupDIY Large Format Contact Printing SetupSubscribe to my free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss another article or update.

Read exclusive articles, both technical and creative, and view fine art portfolios in the Darkroom Underground Magazine.

Explore my Training Materials that include video workshops, eBooks, and quick reference cards.

Learn more about my Fine Art Platinum and Platinum/Palladium Printmaking.
I wanted to make a simple, but very effective and inexpensive contact printing setup that I could use just about anywhere.  I wanted to be able to make 8x10 contact prints, so my design had to accommodate this requirement.  

I headed down to my local hardware store for a couple parts and then I stopped by Walmart to pick up some art board.  In the section below, I will list all the parts I used and in the video you can see how I put it all together.

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For the box, I used 4 pieces of white art board 20"x30" that were $0.88 cents each. I taped three of them together in a way that would allow it to fully collapse flat. I purchased 6 pieces to have extra in case I messed something up or needed more than I anticipated. 

For the light source, I purchased a variety of incandescent low-wattage bulbs and LED lights.  In the end, I settled on the 7.5W bulb because I determined that I needed 1 EV of light to make a print in the 30 second range with the light source 30 inches from the print.  I tested both types of bulbs and both of them worked equally as well.  I like having enough time to dodge and burn if needed, so that is why I aim for a 20 to 30 second printing time.  I also do split grade printing, so I half my total exposure time between two different exposures via my variable contrast filters. 

I needed a way to mount the light, so I used a simple shop light that I purchased from the hardware store.  I removed the chrome reflector and mounting clamp and I cut a hole in a piece of art board and simply pushed it through the hole.  

Since I wanted to be able to control my contrast, I needed a way to place variable contrast filters below the light source.  I decided that I should use the Ilford 6" x 6" variable contrast filters, so I made a little tray out of art board that was 3 inches below the light source.  In the video, you get a good look at how I made that.  I just cut the pieces and duct taped them to the top. It is simple and effective.  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos. 

I also knew that I needed to probably adjust the volume of light reaching the contact printing frame, I picked up a dimmer cord and switch.  I used an old enlarger timer that I had laying around the darkroom, so I could easily control my exposure time by varying the volume of light.  I plugged the dimmer cord into the wall outlet and the enlarger timer into the dimmer so that I could control the light during exposure.  

It turns out that I ended up using the 7.5W bulb as I mentioned above and I did need the dimmer to trim the light down to 1 EV vs. the 3.5EV that the bulb emitted without any adjustment.  My original test with the 35W bulb was way too much like at 7.3 EV.  Now that you know you need 1 EV of light at a distance of 30 inches, you can build your own contact printing setup and adjust it to meet your needs.  

You could even make your contact printing setup mostly light safe if you need to work in an area that isn't fully dark.  

Since I had an 8x10 contact printing frame, I decided to use it to sandwich together my large format negatives and darkroom paper during the exposure, but I could have use a simple piece of glass or any number of other ways to hold the negative flat against the paper.

I am excited to share my new large format video workshop series with you.  

The entire project from design to making a beautiful contact print from one of my 5x7 large format negatives took about 2 hours.  You can build your large format contact printing setup in a fraction of the time and start making some brand new silver gelatin large format contact prints.  If you do, send me a note and a photo of your setup.  

Later this week, I plan on exposing some 6x17 film and contact printing them too.  I think these 6x17 panoramic contact prints will present very well after I determine the right amount of mat board that will draw in the viewer to these small, but impressive prints.  I am thinking that I will use a larger board, maybe something in the 14"x17" range, but I will have to see when I get there what I like best.  If it turns out well, I will write an article and share some photos with you.  

I also really like 4x5 and 5x7 large format negatives printed on 8x10 paper too.  I cut out a custom mask from black art paper so that I can print on a full sheet of 8x10 paper and end up with a naturally framed print that looks great even without a mat board.  

 

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) black and white contact printing darkroom diy fine art large format silver gelatin http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/diy-large-format-contact-printing-setup Tue, 17 Apr 2018 12:00:18 GMT
A Visual Approach To Large Format Film Speed & Development Time Testing by Paul Wainwright http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/visual-approach-to-large-format-film-speed-development-time-testing-by-paul-wainwright Spanning the first four editions of the Darkroom Underground Magazine, Paul Wainwright systematically teaches you how to properly test your large format black and white film and establish the development times for any film and developer combination.

What makes this series even more interesting and important is Paul's method doesn't require a densitometer!  Yes, that is correct.  You can finally test your black and white film and developer combinations and you don't need a densitometer.  I personally think a visual approach is the most practical and relevant because it is based on reality and not scientific numbers that get calculated.  I have been using a similar approach to Paul's methods for many years and I highly recommend his method to any large format photographer that wants total control over the technical aspects of their workflow. 

You can learn Paul's systematic visual-based method for testing your black and white films and developers starting with the first edition of the magazine (July 2017), then part two is covered in the October 2017 Edition, part 3 in the January 2018 Edition, and the culmination of the series is presented in a practical and real-world application in the April 2018 Edition

If you are a current subscriber, new or existing, you can receive a special 25% discount on all of the past editions by contacting me for a special discount code that you can use at checkout. If you aren't a subscriber today, go ahead and subscribe to receive the most current edition of the magazine and then claim your 25% discount on any of the past editions. 

In the first article (Volume 1 Number 1, July 2017), Paul described his method for making a 4 x 5 negative that contains all zones from Zone zero through Zone X, in half-zone steps, together with a “film base plus fog” exposure. He also described a similar procedure for making a 10-zone series of exposures for roll film users.

In the second article (Volume 1 Number 2, October 2017), Paul described his approach to using these negatives to determine his own personal film speed and development times, without a densitometer.

In the third article (Volume 2 Number 1, January 2018), Paul discusses how he uses a contact print of the 10-stop zone test negative as a poor-man’s reflection densitometer, and his method for checking the linearity of his spot meter.

In the final article in this series (Volume 2 Number 2, April 2018), Paul illustrates a practical application of his methods in real life.

-Tim Layton

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Tim Layton - Nature & Botanical Fine Art Photography
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white darkroom film film testing fine art large format large format film testing paul wainwright photography http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/visual-approach-to-large-format-film-speed-development-time-testing-by-paul-wainwright Sun, 08 Apr 2018 14:12:06 GMT
Making a Wet Collodion Negative & Collodio-Chloride Print Tutorial by Quinn Jacobson http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/making-a-wet-collodion-negative-collodio-chloride-print-tutorial-by-quinn-jacobson Quinn Jacobson single handily revived wet plate collodion over the last 20+ years.  

I remember watching one of Quinn's first YouTube Videos on how to make a Wet Plate Collodion Portrait over 11 years ago!  

Quinn continues to inspire me as well as thousands of photographers across the world with his endless knowledge and talents.  If you thought Quinn's talents were only limited to analog photography, you would be wrong.  Check out his mastery of blacksmithing too!

In the April 2018 Edition of the Darkroom Underground, Quinn shares a 12-page tutorial on how to make a wet collodion negative and collodion-chloride print

As a long-time large format photographer and someone who has made wet plates for many years, I continue to learn from Quinn.  One of the things that makes this specific technique so appealing for me personally is the ability to make prints from the wet collodion negative versus making a solo positive plate.  This is key for photographers that need or want to sell their work.  

I hope you enjoy this tutorial by Quinn.  His body of work spanning multiple continents and his level of influence on the analog photography and visual arts community is nothing short of amazing.  Take a look at Quinn's bio and you will quickly understand how much he has accomplished and the level of influence he continues to have on the photography and arts communities. 

-Tim Layton

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Tim Layton - Nature & Botanical Fine Art Photography
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white collodion fine art large format quinn jacobson wetplate wetplate collodion http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/making-a-wet-collodion-negative-collodio-chloride-print-tutorial-by-quinn-jacobson Sun, 08 Apr 2018 13:42:43 GMT
A New Article by Bruce Barnbaum Explores The Question "Did It Look Like That?" http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/a-new-article-by-bruce-barnbaum-explores-the-question-did-it-look-like-that Iconic and legendary large format photographer Bruce Barnbaum wrote an important and thoughtful article in the April 2018 Edition of the Darkroom Underground Magazine about the most popular question a landscape photographer gets from people, "Did it look like that?".

Bruce Barnbaum is recognized as one of the world's finest landscape and architectural photographers, and for decades has been considered one of the best instructors in the field of photography.  

"Let’s explore why it seems to be asked of landscape photographs, and apparently only landscape photographs. Let’s further explore the range of reasonable responses to the question and the true relationship of landscape photographs to the question."

Bruce begins his inquiry by reviewing one of the most iconic landscape photographers in history, Moonrise, Hernandez, 1941 by Ansel Adams.  He walks you through the process and changes that Ansel made to his negative and versions of this print over the years to help illustrate and provide context to the central question in his article.  

Bruce shares several of his popular and inspiring photographs with readers and shares the backstory to help illustrate the concept of this compelling article.  

Read this innovative and thoughtful article in the April 2018 Edition of the Darkroom Underground Magazine.  

Bruce has authored several books, some of which have become classics. His early publication of The Art of Photography: An Approach to Personal Expression (first published in 1994 and going out of print in 2002) was updated, revamped, and newly released in late 2010. After having sold over 100,000 copies, it is now in its second edition. This book became an instant bestseller and is sure to remain a classic for years to come. I highly recommend this book to all photographers, whether you enjoy working in the darkroom or you want to get the most out of your latest digital gear.  

-Tim Layton

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Check Out My Latest Books, Video Workshops, and Quick Start Guides For Darkroom and Large Format Photographers. 

Tim Layton - Nature & Botanical Fine Art Photography
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white bruce barnbaum fine art landscape photography large format http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/a-new-article-by-bruce-barnbaum-explores-the-question-did-it-look-like-that Sun, 08 Apr 2018 10:54:00 GMT
Visualizing Landscapes in The Social Media Age by Large Format Photographer, Alex Burke http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/visualizing-landscapes-in-the-social-media-age-by-large-format-photographer-alex-burke OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA In the April 2018 Edition of the Darkroom Underground Magazine Alex Burke wrote a thoughtful and inspiring around about being a large format landscape photographer in the social media age that we all live in at this time. 

I think Alex is one of the best landscape photographers working today, independent of the tools and cameras that he uses.  I also think his use of large format gear is more than about the gear.  His style, workflow, and approach to creating beautiful and compelling landscape photographs is all intertwined with his choice of tools.  

In his latest article in the April 2018 Edition, Alex shares his inspiring and creative perspective on how to create new and innovative landscape photographs, even in those often visited iconic locations. 

"When it comes to creating images of natural landscapes I have recently heard from both experienced and aspiring photographers that it seems like everything has been photographed a million times before, often told in somewhat of a hopeless tone as if it were time to throw in the towel."

Alex provides clear direction on how you can cure the problem of producing the same or very similar images as everyone else.  

"We tend to just see the same shots, albeit with some slightly different lighting conditions and certainly some variances in post processing thanks to countless sliders and the patience some people have to blend dozens of images together on a computer."

Over the course of his 12-page article, Alex takes you on an emotional and inspirational journey as he shares his stunning landscape photographs and how he goes about creating them in our over saturated social media world that we all live in today.

-Tim Layton

Join my Free Newsletter and never miss an update again. 

Check Out My Latest Books, Video Workshops, and Quick Start Guides For Darkroom and Large Format Photographers. 

Tim Layton - Nature & Botanical Fine Art Photography
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) alex burke colorado film landscape photography large format http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/visualizing-landscapes-in-the-social-media-age-by-large-format-photographer-alex-burke Sun, 08 Apr 2018 10:14:50 GMT
Large Format Scouting Trip To Eden Falls & Lost Valley http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/large-format-scouting-trip-to-eden-falls-lost-valley On Saturday March 31st, 2018, I hiked to Eden Falls and explored Lost Valley with my 4x5 large format view camera. 

I spent the day hiking and exploring the Lost Valley Trail and all that nature has to offer.  The hiking trail and waterfalls are absolutely beautiful and worth taking the time to explore and enjoy.  I am excited to return a little later in the spring as the flowers and trees continue to bloom and hopefully more rain will fall to keep the cascades and waterfalls flowing. 

Enjoy the video below as I hike to the waterfall and enjoy the sights and sounds of nature for a much needed break from your busy day.  

Join my Free Newsletter and never miss an update again. 

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Tim Layton - Nature & Botanical Fine Art Photography
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) arkansas eden falls lost valley trail waterfall http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/4/large-format-scouting-trip-to-eden-falls-lost-valley Sun, 08 Apr 2018 04:41:19 GMT
Brand New Introduction To Large Format Photography Video Workshop Series Announcement http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/3/brand-new-introduction-to-large-format-photography-video-workshop-announcement After several years of photographers from around the world asking me to develop a comprehensive video workshop on large format photography, I have listened to all your requests and I have begun the official process of producing this brand new series of video workshops

For a complete list of the table of contents for each of the modules (View Camera, The Negative, The Print/Output), visit my large format photography course page for all of the details and the ability to sign up for the workshops while they are being developed to claim your 25% discount and have behind the scenes access to the videos as they are being developed. 

I am really excited to release these comprehensive and practical video-based workshops on large format.  It has been a long time coming and I look forward to partnering and collaborating with you during the development of this course.  

If you have any questions or comments, you can always contact me.  

Join my Free Newsletter and never miss an update again. 

Check Out My Latest Books, Video Workshops, and Quick Start Guides For Darkroom and Large Format Photographers. 

Tim Layton - Nature & Botanical Fine Art Photography
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white darkroom film large format http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/3/brand-new-introduction-to-large-format-photography-video-workshop-announcement Fri, 30 Mar 2018 11:47:00 GMT
Three Purple Tulips - New Limited Edition, Silver Gelatin Darkroom Print http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/3/three-purple-tulips-new-limited-edition-silver-gelatin-darkroom-print Three Purple Tulips by Tim Layton Brand new limited edition silver gelatin darkroom print is now available for purchase.  

For more information and pricing, click on the image. 

STORY BEHIND THE NEW PRINT

Tulips represent positive and uplifting messages to me and by creating a black and white fine art silver gelatin print of these three purple tulips, you can bring part of yourself into the image.  

You can maximize your viewing experience by enjoying your print in a quiet place, allowing your eyes to move around and catch the focal points that stand out to you.  

Then take a deep breath and close your eyes.  Allow yourself to fully relax and block out everything else in your mind other than the image and the rise and fall of your chest as you breath.  Now with your minds eye, retrace those focal points and color the black and white image with your version of purple.  This will take your experience to new levels.  I hope that you enjoy your new artwork and I want to hear from you.  

Originally from Persia and Turkey, tulips were brought to Europe in the 16th century, where they got their common name from the Turkish word for gauze (with which turbans were wrapped) - reflecting the turban-like appearance of a tulip in full bloom. By the 17th century, the popularity of tulips, particularly in the Netherlands, became so great that the price of a single bulb soared to new heights, causing markets to crash and putting into motion "tulip mania."

A Turkish legend may be responsible for the red tulip's symbolism. The story goes that a prince named Farhad was love struck by a maiden named Shirin. When Farhad learned that Shirin had been killed, he was so overcome with grief that he killed himself - riding his horse over the edge of a cliff. It's said that a scarlet tulip sprang up from each droplet of his blood, giving the red tulip the meaning "perfect love."

The tulip's velvety black center represents a lover's heart, darkened by the heat of passion. With the power to rival roses in their red variety and the sweet charm to express simple joy when yellow, it's no wonder that in addition to all its other symbolism, in the language of flowers, a tulip bouquet represents elegance and grace.

Purple combines the calm stability of blue and the fierce energy of red. The color purple is often associated with royalty, nobility, luxury, power, and ambition. Purple also represents meanings of wealth, extravagance, creativity, wisdom, dignity, grandeur, devotion, peace, pride, mystery, independence, and magic.

The color purple is a rare occurring color in nature and as a result is often seen as having sacred meaning.

The color purple has a variety of effects on the mind and body, including uplifting spirits, calming the mind and nerves, enhancing the sacred, creating feelings of spirituality, increasing nurturing tendencies and sensitivity, and encouraging imagination and creativity.

Purple is associated spirituality, the sacred, higher self, passion, third eye, fulfillment, and vitality. Purple helps align oneself with the whole of the universe. Different shades, tints, and hues of purple have different meanings. Light purple hues represent feminine energy and delicacy, as well as romantic and nostalgic feelings. Dark purple hues evoke feelings of gloom, sadness, and frustration. Bright purple hues suggest riches and royalty.

Because the purple color is created by combining a strong warm with a strong cool color, the color retains both warm and cool properties. On one hand, the color purple can boost imagination and creativity, on the other, too much purple can cause moodiness.

Throughout history, purple robes were worn by royalty and people of authority or high rank. Many believe this to be true because the rare occurrence of purple in nature made it one of the most expensive color dyes to create. 

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Check Out My Latest Books, Video Workshops, and Quick Start Guides For Darkroom and Large Format Photographers. 

Tim Layton
Black & White Fine Art Photography
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) artist original darkroom print silver gelatin http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/3/three-purple-tulips-new-limited-edition-silver-gelatin-darkroom-print Thu, 08 Mar 2018 14:21:31 GMT
Uno Yellow Lily - New Limited Edition, Silver Gelatin Darkroom Print http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/3/uno-yellow-lily---new-limited-edition-silver-gelatin-darkroom-print Uno Yellow Lily by Tim LaytonUno Yellow Lily Brand new limited edition silver gelatin darkroom print is now available for purchase.  

For more information and pricing, click on the image. 

STORY BEHIND THE NEW PRINT

One of the reasons I create the majority of my fine art work in black and white is because it leaves something to the imagination and allows my viewers to bring part of themselves into the experience.  Lilies and the color yellow have a long and interesting history.  My artist originals favor positive and uplifting meanings because I want to bring something positive and hopeful to the world. 

Dating as far back as 1580 B.C., when images of lilies were discovered in a villa in Crete, these majestic flowers have long held a role in ancient mythology. Derived from the Greek word "leiron," (generally assumed to refer to the white Madonna lily), the lily was so revered by the Greeks that they believed it sprouted from the milk of Hera, the queen of the gods. 

While white lilies symbolize chastity and virtue – and were the symbol of the Virgin Mary’s purity and her role of Queen of the Angels – as other varieties became popular, they brought with them additional meanings and symbolism as well. 

As the flowers most often associated with funerals, lilies symbolize that the soul of the departed has received restored innocence after death.

Yellow, the color of sunshine, hope, and happiness, has conflicting associations. On one hand yellow stands for freshness, happiness, positivity, clarity, energy, optimism, enlightenment, remembrance, intellect, honor, loyalty, and joy, but on the other, it represents cowardice and deceit.

Studies show that the meaning of the color yellow can be warmth, cheerfulness, increased mental activity, increased muscle energy. The color yellow helps activate the memory, encourage communication, enhance vision, build confidence, and stimulate the nervous system.

Join my Free Newsletter and never miss an update again. 

Check Out My Latest Books, Video Workshops, and Quick Start Guides For Darkroom and Large Format Photographers. 

Tim Layton
Black & White Fine Art Photography
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) artist original darkroom print silver gelatin http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/3/uno-yellow-lily---new-limited-edition-silver-gelatin-darkroom-print Thu, 08 Mar 2018 13:57:57 GMT
How To Develop T-Max 100 in XTOL Using a SP-445 Daylight Tank http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/how-to-develop-t-max-100-in-xtol-using-a-sp-445-daylight-tank SP-445 B&W Large Format Film Development Daylight TankSP-445 B&W Large Format Film Development Daylight TankSubscribe to my free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss another article or update.

Read exclusive articles, both technical and creative, and view fine art portfolios in the Darkroom Underground Magazine.

Explore my Training Materials that include video workshops, eBooks, and quick reference cards.

Learn more about my Fine Art Platinum and Platinum/Palladium Printmaking.
I have been working on creating some new black and white floral still life images for some brand new silver gelatin darkroom gallery prints that I plan to release later this spring and summer.  

I also scan my original large format film negatives for my low-cost vintage style black and white giclée art print collection.  

I have been using black and white T-Max 100 film and developing the large format negatives in XTOL using the Stearman Press SP-445 daylight development tank.  

I get a lot of requests from readers of my free newsletter as well as my YouTube channel to share more details behind my creative process, so I decided to create this article and video to share the specifics of how I develop my 4x5 large format T-Max 100 black and white film in XTOL using the SP-445 daylight tank. 

As discussed in the video, I dilute XTOL to 1:1 and develop my 4x5 black and white sheet film in the SP-445 daylight tank for 10 minutes at 68F/20C.  I prewash my T-Max 100 with distilled water to remove the annihilation layer from the film.  In the next step, I develop the films for 10 minutes with a XTOL 1:1 at 68F/20C.  I initially agitate the film for 15 seconds and then after the first minute, I perform two agitation cycles every 30 seconds for the remainder of the development time.  I demonstrate my agitation method in the video above.  I then do a 30 second water stop bath and then fix with TF-4 archival fixer for 10 minutes with constant agitation. Next, I wash the film for at least 15 to 20 minutes with tap water to fully clear it and then put the sheets of film into a tray of water and PhotoFlo for one minute before hanging the film to dry.   

I need negatives that will scan very well, and also print in the darkroom.  There are other film and developer combinations that also work very well, but I have found that T-Max 100 and XTOL 1:1 provide very consistent and reliable results for me.  

Development Process Overview

  • Prewash in distilled water (68F/20C)
  • Develop in XTOL 1:1 for 10 minutes
  • Initial agitation for 15 seconds for first minute, then 2 cycles every 30 seconds
  • Water stop bath for 30 seconds
  • Fix with TF-4 for 10 minutes (constant agitation) 
  • Final Wash 15 to 20 minutes 
  • Put sheet film in tray of PhotoFlo for 1 minute
  • Hang to dry

Join my Free Newsletter and never miss an update again. 

Check Out My Latest Books, Video Workshops, and Quick Start Guides For Darkroom and Large Format Photographers. 

Tim Layton
Black & White Fine Art Photography
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white darkroom film fine art kodak large format photography sp-445 tf-4 t-max 100 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/how-to-develop-t-max-100-in-xtol-using-a-sp-445-daylight-tank Thu, 22 Feb 2018 06:31:26 GMT
New Home Decor Giclée Botanical Art Collection by Tim Layton http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/new-home-decor-giclee-botanical-art-collection-by-tim-layton Tulip - Red, 5x7 or 11x14Tulip - Red, 5x7 or 11x14Artist original giclée prints available in standard sizes. Custom crops and aspect ratios are available upon request.

Pricing:
5x7 - $15
8x10 - $20
11x14 - $40
16x20 - $99

* Framing and matting not included.

* Shipping to USA only. All artwork is placed in an acid-free archival sleeve and carefully prepared for shipment to ensure safe arrival of your new artwork.

Your new artwork is trimmed to size and arrives ready to frame immediately. We standardized our artwork dimensions to common “off the shelf” frame sizes to help you get your new art installed in the fastest and least expensive way.
I have been working on a brand new home decor botanical art collection and it is ready to share with you.  

I have two collections to share with you and I will describe them below.  I am just getting started, so you may want to join my free newsletter so you don't miss out on all the new additions coming soon. 

I wanted to bring beautiful art for your home and office at an affordable price without sacrificing quality.  I only use the finest materials for these collections, following my same level of care and standards for my artist original platinum and silver gelatin gallery prints.  

All of the prints from both collections come in standard off the shelf sizes (5x7, 8x10, 11x14, 16x20), so they are ready to frame and display when your new artwork arrives in the mail.  

I want you to be able to not think twice about getting this beautiful and uplifting botanical art for your home or office, so I found a way to deliver this art to you at affordable prices. The pricing starts at only $29 for a 5x7 image on an 8x10 art paper that has a natural border.  The natural border that I create eliminates the need for a mat, making it ready to frame immediately and saving you more money and time.    

FLOWERS & BOTANICALS

As you may already know, I have been passionate about flowers and nature my entire life and that love and appreciation is the focus of my creative expression.  

Flowers can instantly transform our moods in an instant and it turns out that medical researchers have proven that flowers and nature scenes have a host of positive effects on our health (lower blood pressure, improves overall feeling of wellbeing, helps us recover faster from illness, and so on.).  I think that is pretty amazing and if my positive and uplifting botanical artwork can help improve your day in any way, that makes me happy and brings joy to my heart. 

The Vintage Botanica Collection is a very special series of new artwork created from historical botanical illustrations from the 16th to 19th centuries.  Before modern photography, scientists relied on artists to create images for them. I transform the historic illustrations into new and unique pieces of contemporary art to bring your home and office something beautiful, peaceful, and fresh. These special giclée botanical art prints have a depth and vibrant color that will put a smile on your face every time you view them.  

The Classic Black & White Collection is created using traditional large format view cameras and large sheets of black and white film. By using large format view cameras, I can create unique artwork that is not possible with modern digital gear. Black and white film creates a feeling and mood that has an x-factor about it that is difficult to describe with words because the experience is emotional versus literal.  Collectors describe Tim's classic black and white botanical collection as elegant, classic, ethereal, and original.  

ART PROCESS OVERVIEW

Paper choice is critical for both archival and presentation purposes and for that reason I use fine art Hahnemühle paper that is acid-free, calcium carbonate buffered, and it has a smooth surface texture. Hahnemühle has been producing and selling artist’s paper since 1584. Over 425 years of experience has shown that Hahnemühle's acid-free fine art papers last for many generations, making your choice of Tim's art a good investment.

I use professional fine art giclée printers with archival quality pigment based inks in conjunction with the Hahnemühle paper to create a high-quality piece of original art that can last hundreds of years.  

Your new artwork is trimmed to size and arrives ready to frame immediately. We standardized our artwork dimensions to common “off the shelf” frame sizes to help you get your new art installed in the fastest and least expensive way.  

Join my Free Newsletter and never miss an update again. 

Check Out My Latest Books, Video Workshops, and Quick Start Guides For Darkroom and Large Format Photographers. 

Tim Layton
Black & White Fine Art Photography
 
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) art black and white botanical art decor" floral still life flowers home vintage vintage art http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/new-home-decor-giclee-botanical-art-collection-by-tim-layton Wed, 21 Feb 2018 13:40:42 GMT
My Journey To Making Traditional Large Scale Darkroom Prints - Episode 3 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/my-journey-to-making-traditional-large-scale-darkroom-prints---episode-3 My Journey To Making Traditional Large Scale Darkroom Prints - Episode 3

In this episode, I thought it would be good to share more details on my design criteria, ideas, and information that I have learned so far. 

Before I do that, I wanted to point out that projects like this is one of the reasons I love making physical prints in the darkroom.  For me, I enjoy every part of the process (researching new locations, exploring, scouting, taking exposures with large format view cameras, developing film, making prints in the darkroom, etc.).  We get to solve problems, make things with our hands, and I think, at least for me, I am closer to my art and I think that shows in the end.  While I appreciate the advances in modern digital technology, as I use many of them too, I think my finest work comes from a place where I have to do things versus sitting behind a computer editing digital files.  

If you want to follow along, you can subscribe to my YouTube channel for the latest videos.  The Playlist for all of the episodes can be found here

UPDATE ON MY DESIGN

I shared in the first episode that my main driver for this project was to find a way to make large darkroom prints in a smaller space and to find a way to use my water and processing chemicals more efficiently.  After some more reflection and input from others, I am updating my vision for this project a little bit.  

I want to be able to process my prints in open daylight versus having to be forced to work under safelight conditions for the entire process.  There is no way around having to load the paper into the pipe in safelight conditions, so that won't change.  

In order to accomplish this goal, I am going to use schedule 8o PVC pipe versus the standard schedule 40.  The schedule 40 pipe is white and the schedule 8o is gray and also has a thicker side wall.  By using the schedule 80 pipe, I can work in open room light, as long as I have both ends of the pipe sealed.  I used this method for my DIY film development tubes last year, so I know it is light safe.  

Next, I need a way to seal the ends of the pipe to keep the light out.  For one end, that is easy, I just use a regular schedule 8o PVC cap and glue it into place.  For the other end, I need to be able to remove the cap to load the paper and pour in the chemicals, but also be light tight.  After some digging around, I found out that the largest test plug made is 6 inches.  A test plug is a cap that has a rubber bushing around it and a way to expand it and to seal the pipe.  I used smaller versions of these plugs for my DIY film development tubes. You can see a photo of the red test plug with the thumb screw on top in this article

In order to be able to take advantage of the test plugs, I need my pipe to be reduced down to at least 6 inches or smaller.  For my 30x40 prints, I will be using 12" pipe, and luckily they make a standard schedule 80 12 inch to 6 inch reducer that will allow me to use the test plug!  This reducer was more expensive than the pipe and the end cap put together, but it is worth it.  I am still searching for a similar solution for the larger pipe that will allow me to create the 40x50 prints.  

I have also been thinking about the process of loading the paper into the pipe, adding and removing the development chemicals too.  In my prototype, I am going to experiment with the idea of making the pipe a little longer to load the chemicals into the bottom of the pipe before loading the paper.  I got this idea from the design of BTZS film development tubes.  I would need to stand the pipe upright on the floor and pour the chemicals in so they pool on the bottom of the pipe.  Then, I would load my exposed paper into the pipe, cap it off, and then quickly place the pipe on the rollers and start the process of rotating it.  I am not sure how feasible or even necessary this is at this point, but I will explore the concept and provide updates in future episodes.  The other option is to pour the chemicals into the pipe via a funnel and tube through the hole in the reducer coupling and then cap it off. 

If I take this approach, then I would want to have a gap between the ends of my paper when it is loaded so that they chemicals are not laying on the paper for too long before I start the rotation of the pipe.  With the first approach, the gap is less critical or may not even be necessary.

More to follow in the next episode as I being testing with the smaller prototype.  I have the larger 12" pipe and supplies on order and they will arrive in about a week.  This will give me time to work through the issues with the smaller prototype and be ready to try larger prints with the bigger pipe. 

If you have any specific questions, you can always connect with me via email and I am usually fairly quick at responding.  

I enjoy getting emails from photographers from around the world.  I always learn something by sharing, so please send your ideas and share your thoughts in the comments section below. 

Enjoy the video below and I look forward to your comments, thoughts, and ideas as I make progress.  The Playlist for all of the episodes can be found here

Join my Free Newsletter and never miss an update again. 

Check Out My Latest Books, Video Workshops, and Quick Start Guides For Darkroom and Large Format Photographers. 

Tim Layton
Black & White Fine Art Photography
 
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white darkroom film large format photography http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/my-journey-to-making-traditional-large-scale-darkroom-prints---episode-3 Mon, 19 Feb 2018 16:00:36 GMT
My Journey To Making Traditional Large Scale Darkroom Prints - Episode 2 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/my-journey-to-making-traditional-large-scale-darkroom-prints---episode-2 My Journey To Making Traditional Large Scale Darkroom Prints - Episode 2

In the first episode, I talked about getting started on making large scale darkroom prints in PVC pipes versus using trays. 

If you want to follow along, you can subscribe to my YouTube channel for the latest videos.  

In this second episode, I share how I designed and built my prototype to develop 16x20 prints on my way to 30x40 and 40x50 prints. 

If you have any specific questions, you can always connect with me via email and I am usually fairly quick at responding.  

I enjoy getting emails from photographers from around the world.  I always learn something by sharing, so please send your ideas and share your thoughts in the comments section below. 

Enjoy the video below and I look forward to your comments, thoughts, and ideas as I make progress.  The Playlist for all of the episodes can be found here

Join my Free Newsletter and never miss an update again. 

Check Out My Latest Books, Video Workshops, and Quick Start Guides For Darkroom and Large Format Photographers. 

Tim Layton
Black & White Fine Art Photography
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white darkroom film large format photography http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/my-journey-to-making-traditional-large-scale-darkroom-prints---episode-2 Sat, 17 Feb 2018 13:06:48 GMT
My Journey To Making Traditional Large Scale Darkroom Prints - Episode 1 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/my-journey-to-making-traditional-large-scale-darkroom-prints---episode-1 This is the first article and movie about my journey to making large scale silver gelatin darkroom prints.  If you want to follow along, you can subscribe to my YouTube channel for the latest videos.  

You may or may not be familiar with large format photographer Clyde Butcher, but this is the scale of prints that I ultimately want to make.   

I have been previously making 40"x50" darkroom prints using a tray method, but I needed a new solution in my new and much smaller darkroom. I am totally off the grid, so I need a solution that was eco-friendly, didn't require much power (if any), and was very efficient with the use of water and darkroom chemicals.  

There are two main components in the journey to making large scale darkroom prints. The first is the enlargement portion and the second is the processing of the prints. I have previously built a custom setup on the enlargement side, so I only need to find a new solution on the wet processing side.    

I posted a message to my Facebook friends and I received several really good ideas.  I ended up liking Ken Osborne's idea the best.  Ken shared his innovate idea of using large PVC pipe on a roller system versus using the trays. Ken developed an elaborate automated system with a motor to rotate the pipe and process the prints.  I knew this was the right approach for me. 

Last year, I shared several articles about how I made DIY development tubes using PVC pipe, so you may want to check that out as well. You can read my subsequent updates to the original article here, and here, and here

I should have thought about using PVC pipe for developing my large scale darkroom prints, but thankfully Ken came to the rescue and shared his method.  Using the large PVC pipe for developing the prints is more or less a large scale manual Jobo processor. It is very efficient with chemical use and I also like that it minimizes the physical handling of the fiber paper to avoid damage during the development process.  

In this first video, I talk about the project and discuss my approach for my prototype for developing smaller 16x20 prints.  After I get the prototype working and the process down, I plan to scale it and make the bigger system for the large prints.  

As a side note, if you are wondering how to calculate the size of pipe you will need for your print size, just multiply the diameter of your PVC pipe by the value of pi (3.14).  So, for example, my prototype needs to accommodate 16x20 prints.  I will use the 16" short side of the print to curl inside the pipe (circumference), and the length of the pipe will need to be a little longer than the long side of the print (20").  In this case, I went with a 6 inch pipe that was 24 inches long.  

The six inch pipe will hold a print a little over 18 inches (6 x 3.14 = 18.84), so this will work out well for the 16x20 prints.  

I was talking to another one of my large format photography friends, Jon Paul, and he had a really good idea.  He mentioned that I should oversize the pipe to allow for a gap between the ends of the paper as a way to allow the chemicals to pool on the bottom of the pipe and not be laying on the fiber paper.  I though that was an excellent idea and so that will be factored into my plans.  I think I could mark the pipe in a way so that I would know when that section of the pipe was on the bottom where I would want it. 

Enjoy the video and I look forward to your comments, thoughts, and ideas as I make progress.  

Get My Free Newsletter and Never Miss an Update Again.

Check Out My Latest Books, Video Workshops, and Quick Start Guides For Darkroom and Large Format Photographers. 

Tim Layton
Black & White Fine Art Photography
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white darkroom film large format photography http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/my-journey-to-making-traditional-large-scale-darkroom-prints---episode-1 Fri, 16 Feb 2018 22:45:09 GMT
Standard Frame Sizes For Mounting Your New Artwork http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/standard-frame-sizes-for-mounting-your-new-artwork It is exciting to purchase new artwork and often times, many people are not sure about what size mat and frame to use with their new artwork.  In this article, I share the most common mat and frame sizes for your artwork.  

If you want your artwork to fit in a standard frame with a pre-cut mat, the following is a list of frame sizes and mat openings that you can find at most arts and craft stores.

For example, if your artwork is 5" x 7", then you will be able to find a wide variety of pre-cut mats and frames to mount and display your new artwork.  The most frequent presentation size for a 5" x 7" piece of artwork is 8" x 10".  You get a nice border around your artwork and 8" x 10" is the most common size.  

Refer to the table below as a guideline to help you determine the most common mat and frame options for your artwork.  

Frame Size Mat Opening Artwork Size
8" x 10" 4.5" x 6.5" 5" x 7"
11" x 14" 7.5" x 9.5" 8" x 10"
16" x 20" 10.5" x 13.5" 11" x 14"
20" x 24" 15.5" x 19.5" 16" x 20"
24" x 36" 19.5" x 29.5" 20" x 30"

If you have questions, feel free to contact me and I am happy to help you. 

Join my Free Newsletter and never miss an update again. 

Check Out My Latest Books, Video Workshops, and Quick Start Guides For Darkroom and Large Format Photographers. 

Tim Layton
Black & White Fine Art Photography
 
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) artwork frame framing mat mounting http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/standard-frame-sizes-for-mounting-your-new-artwork Thu, 15 Feb 2018 04:45:05 GMT
Exploring a Possible New Multi-Media Book on Platinum Printmaking and Seeking Your Input http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/exploring-a-possible-new-book-on-platinum-printmaking-and-seeking-your-input

I am considering writing a new multi-media book for publication next year, and I would like your input.

The publication would include a book in PDF format and HD videos that help illustrate the concepts and techniques in the text.

I intend to embrace the work of the greats from the 19th and 20th centuries and build on everything that we have learned from the masters to include William Willis, Irving Penn, Mike Ware, Dick Arentz, Patrick Alt, Dick Sullivan, and many others.

I don't want to duplicate their work because that wouldn't add any value.  I want to make a brand new practical publication of how to apply the information from an artists perspective.  If you know a little about platinum and palladium printing, then you know there are an avalanche of variables that have a direct impact on aesthetic qualities of the final prints.  

For example, I would consider making a print using the same negative and paper, but use three or four different developers and then review the impacts of those developers on the aesthetic qualities of the prints.  I could go even deeper and vary the temperature of each of these developers too.  

That sort of thing is horribly time-consuming and highly subjective, but very valuable to someone that is searching for variables to tell their story in a way that best suits them.  I suspect many photographers may never explore to this degree.  I have a hundred other ideas just like this that could be part of the publication.  

I posted a couple of things on my personal Facebook page and received some valuable feedback from several photographers.  

Based on that input, I have a working title of "The 21st Century Guide to Platinum Printing".  Should I use the word "Printmaking" vs. "Printing"?  That would make the title "The 21st Century Guide to Platinum Printmaking". I feel that is a little closer to the intent of the publication.  It really is all about making platinum prints and how to navigate through the vast number of choices one can make during the process.  

The original three titles were:
1 - The Platinum Printmaking Cookbook
2 - Platinum Printmakers Definitive Guide
3 - The Definitive Guide to Platinum Printmaking

Do you feel any of these working titles capture the essence of what I am trying to accomplish?  If so, which one?

Is there a new title that works even better? 

Do you feel this project would add value to platinum and palladium printmakers?  

Please share your thoughts and comments below, and I will keep everyone posted on all of this as I continue to explore this project. 

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Tim Layton
Black & White Fine Art Photography
 
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) black and white photography fine art large format palladium platinum http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/2/exploring-a-possible-new-book-on-platinum-printmaking-and-seeking-your-input Thu, 01 Feb 2018 23:45:43 GMT