Tim Layton Fine Art: Blog http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog en-us (C) Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) Tue, 17 Jul 2018 13:26:00 GMT Tue, 17 Jul 2018 13:26:00 GMT http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/img/s/v-5/u131224912-o510457233-50.jpg Tim Layton Fine Art: Blog http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog 80 120 Large Format B&W Silver Gelatin Fine Art Print - Darkroom Dahlia http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/large-format-b-w-silver-gelatin-fine-art-print---darkroom-dahlia Subscribe to my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss another article or update.

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It was a fantastic day in the darkroom. My son and I made this new print using our newly updated 8x10 enlarger.

"Darkroom Dahlia" is a limited edition black and white silver gelatin darkroom print that is available for purchase

I used my split-grade print method on Ilford MGIV Fiber paper for this print and it is selenium toned to museum quality archival standards.  

The negative was FP4+ 8x10 and developed in Pyrocat HD 1:1:100.  

You can watch the two movies below this text where I photographed the flower, developed the film, and made the fine art print using the new 8x10 enlarger setup.  

I grow flowers in my greenhouse, around my darkroom, and all over my land in the Ozark's so that I can photograph them and create artist original fine art prints like this. This particular flower was grown in the front of my darkroom and that is why I titled it "Darkroom Dahlia".  Dahlia's along with tulips and lilies are among my favorites.  

I used my split-grade method and selenium toned to help enhance the overall contrast and appearance of this print.  I am really happy with it and I hope that you enjoy it. 

CREATING THE EXPOSURE & DEVELOPING THE NEGATIVE - EPISODE 1

MAKING THE PRINT IN THE DARKROOM - EPISODE 2

"DARKROOM DAHLIA" - THE FINAL PRINT

 

You can follow along as I make prints like this on my YouTube Channel or join my Free Darkroom Newsletter so you never miss an update in the future. 

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Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white Dahlia darkroom film fine art Floral Still Life Flower FP4 large format photography Pyrocat HD http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/large-format-b-w-silver-gelatin-fine-art-print---darkroom-dahlia Sat, 14 Jul 2018 20:42:39 GMT
Large Format B&W Dahlia Floral Still Life - Episode 1 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/large-format-dahlia-floral-still-life-episode-1 In this episode, I take you behind the scenes with me outside of my darkroom while I photograph a freshly-bloomed Dahlia.  I share my experience during the exposure and then I develop the film in the darkroom.  

In the next video, I am going to start the process of making a 30x40 print from this negative.  I will make some small 8x10 test prints from the center of the Dahlia to make sure I want to proceed with the larger print.  You can follow along with me on my YouTube channel.  

I planted several Dahlias outside of my darkroom because I love to photograph these flowers.  I also grow my own flowers in my greenhouse and on my land in the Ozark's. 

I used my Nikkor 240mm F5.6 lens for this 1:1 macro composition which required a bellows draw of twice the focal length.  I used a front tilt to get the entire flower sharp.  I cover all of these types of details and much more in my comprehensive Large Format B&W Still Life Video Workshop.  You get immediate access to 17 HD videos and a 68-page workbook.  

I exposed two sheets of Ilford FP4+ and I used Pyrocat HD as my developer in my Jobo CPP-2. In the next video, I am going to make a contact proof sheet and determine if I want to print this big or not.  The negatives looked pretty good when I hung them to dry, but I will have to see how I feel about them once they are dry and I can inspect them more closely.  

I share all of the technical details (film speed EI rating, development time/method for Pyrocat HD, and more) via my Free Darkroom Newsletter.  I hope you enjoy the video and be sure to share your comments below this article.  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) 8x10 Large Format Black and White film fine art Floral Still Life FP4+ Jobo Large Format Pyrocat HD http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/large-format-dahlia-floral-still-life-episode-1 Fri, 13 Jul 2018 22:04:50 GMT
Video: Wall Mounting My 8x10 Large Format Enlarger For Making Black & White Fine Art Prints http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/video-wall-mounting-my-8x10-large-format-enlarger-for-making-40x50-fine-art-prints In this video, I share my latest update on wall mounting my Beseler 810V-XL 8x10 large format enlarger for making 40x50 and 30x40 large format silver gelatin darkroom prints.

I hope you enjoy the video and be sure to share which enlarger you are using to make your prints in the comment section below. 

BACKGROUND

It would seem that the vast majority of photographers today are either making small darkroom prints at home as part of their hobby or those that are printing at the 40x50 size or bigger are most likely scanning their negatives and making some type of computer-driven digital output as part of their art sales.  I want to be clear, there is absolutely nothing wrong with scanning and making digital prints, it just isn't the same as making the same size prints by hand in the darkroom and most importantly for me, it isn't part of my creative vision.  

I think it is reasonable to assume that most photographer's today could be taught how to properly scan their films and then send that digital file to a lab for making their prints in the matter of a few days.  The only stumbling blocks would be having enough money to purchase a suitable scanner and computer system, and even then, they could outsource the development, scanning, and printing processes thereby eliminating their need for everything but a computer and a program like Photoshop.  

On the other hand, if you want to make big prints in the darkroom, you have a variety of challenges that you will need to solve before that is even possible.  First, you simply need the knowledge and experience to tackle something this big.   Everything you do is magnified and more complex.  Just the handling of the fiber paper during the development process is a challenge to keep from damaging and ruining the prints. Because we are dealing with a physical medium, the issue of space is a huge obstacle to overcome for most photographers, even if they have the knowledge to make large darkroom prints.  When you print 30x40, 40x50, or bigger in the darkroom, you have to want it really bad because there is a long road of challenges that will stand in your way.  

WHY PRINT THIS BIG?

Why would I be crazy enough to make large prints by hand in the darkroom in our modern digital-driven world today?

Probably as important as any reason, I love the process. I love everything about it.  I love using large format view cameras and since my most used format is 8x10, my choices are either to make contact prints or if I want to make enlargements, I need to jump off the edge of the cliff and build a custom solution using an 8x10 enlarger.  I have been previously making 30x40 and 40x50 prints from 4x5 negatives and a custom solution that I built to make that happen.  With 8x10 being four times the size of 4x5, the level of quality for my type of photography will be taken to new levels.   

I enjoy nature, being outside and connecting with the serenity and peace of the outdoors.  I share my love and appreciation of nature through my fine art prints and I deeply enjoy connecting with collectors and fellow large format photographers.  I am fascinated with flowers, trees, rivers, and wide open spaces in the mountains.  In our modern technology-centric society, people are getting further and further away from nature.  I hope to inspire people to get outside and have their own experiences.  For my collectors, I want to provide them with something special that is rare and unusual.  

When you step into a room with a large format silver gelatin print that has been properly mounted, framed and in the right lighting, it is breathtaking.  I remember seeing one of Clyde Butcher's large prints for the first time in person.  I was simply awestruck.  I realized the size, scale, and clarity of Clyde's mural-sized black and white silver gelatin prints allowed me to be taken on a visual and emotional journey that I had never been on before.  

Many years before that experience, I had the good fortune of attending a private viewing of Ansel's large prints.  I could barely believe my eyes.  I would look at his prints in almost disbelief and then turn away to rest my eyes and mind because I could not fully understand or process how someone could create something so magnificent.

Clyde and Ansel are heroes to me.  They make me want to keep going and make artwork that is connected to higher-level causes and meanings.  Both men are well-known advocates for nature and I also share that same level of passion with them.  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography Beseler Beseler 45V-XL Beseler 810V-XL black and white darkroom film fine art large format photography http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/video-wall-mounting-my-8x10-large-format-enlarger-for-making-40x50-fine-art-prints Tue, 10 Jul 2018 11:32:15 GMT
Video: 8x10 Darkroom Enlarger Lens Reveal http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/8x10-darkroom-enlarger-lens-reveal I get frequent questions about which lenses I use to make my silver gelatin fine art gallery prints, so I put together this article to share my lenses with you.  

I use a Beseler 810V-XL 8x10 enlarger to make the majority of my fine art prints.  I have a cold light head for this enlarger which I prefer over a condenser type of light source.

ENLARGER LENSES

Beseler 240mm APO-HD Lens - I use this lens for my 8x10, 5x7, and 6x17 Pano negatives

Rodenstock 150mm F9 APO-Gerogon - I use this lens for my 4x5 negatives 

Schneider 135mm F5.6 Componon-S - I use this lens for my 4x5 negatives 

Rodenstock 105mm F4.5 Omegaron - I use this lens for my 6x9 and 6x7 negatives 

Rodenstock 90mm F4.5 Rogonar-S - I use this lens for my 6x6 and 6x4.5 negatives 

Enjoy the video and leave me a comment below and let me know what enlarger and lenses you use to make your prints.

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) 8x10 Large Format analog photography Beseler darkroom Enlarger film fine art large format photography Silver Gelatin http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/8x10-darkroom-enlarger-lens-reveal Fri, 06 Jul 2018 16:32:57 GMT
Video: My 8x10 Large Format Enlarger Setup For Making 30x40 & 40x50 Silver Gelatin Prints http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/video-my-8x10-large-format-enlarger-setup-for-making-30x40-40x50-silver-gelatin-prints In this video, I share my brand new setup that I just finished for making 30x40 and 40x50 silver gelatin darkroom prints. 

In the next edition of the Darkroom Underground Magazine, I plan to create a new article and possibly videos that shares my journey with all this over the next few months.

I will be addressing the various challenges in future videos that I have to manage when printing this big.

There is much more to come on all of this, so stay tuned and enjoy the story as it unfolds.  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white black and white photography darkroom film fine art large format large format photography photography silver gelatin http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/video-my-8x10-large-format-enlarger-setup-for-making-30x40-40x50-silver-gelatin-prints Tue, 03 Jul 2018 18:33:22 GMT
Making 40x50 Silver Gelatin Prints With my 8x10 Enlarger http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/making-40x50-silver-gelatin-prints-with-my-8x10-enlarger I am working on a new solution to make 40x50 and 30x40 silver gelatin fiber gallery prints from 8x10 film on my Beseler 8x10 enlarger.  I have the 810A cold light head conversion kit on the 45V-XL frame.  

The photo to the left is the 8x10 enlarger setting on the darkroom floor and a piece of 32x40 white art board to illustrate the size of a new baseboard that I will have to build.  

The ceilings in my darkroom are only 8 feet, so this presented a problem for me.  I don't have the optional wall projection kit for my enlarger, nor do I have space for that, so I had to come up with a different solution.  

I have previously been making my large prints with my Beseler 45MX enlarger and 4x5 sheet film using a custom cabinet that I designed and built.  The system works really well, but it takes up a lot of space on a full time basis in my darkroom.  I also wanted to be able to make the the highest quality large format gallery prints from my 8x10, 5x7, Whole Plate (6.5x8.5), and 6x17 negatives, so I needed to come up with a solution that had a smaller footprint using my 8x10 enlarger.  

In the next edition of the Darkroom Underground Magazine, I plan to create a new article and possibly videos that shares my journey with all this over the next few months.

I primarily shoot 8x10 film because I am able to make my silver gelatin contact prints, platinum prints, and enlargements from a single sheet of film and of course the quality is unparalleled with 8x10.  With this new approach, I will be able to offer a better variety of artwork to my collectors.  

The first challenge that I needed to solve was understanding the maximum print size that I could make on the stock baseboard using my 240mm wide angle lens.  When I make large prints, I like to leave a white border, typically two inches, for handling and processing of the prints.  I had to sit the enlarger on the floor in my darkroom in order to be able to fully extend the head to test this (see photo above).  Using the 240mm lens, I am able to make 30x40 prints with a 2 inch border after I create the larger baseboard.  This allows for me to quickly start making 30x40 prints without any custom building.

I have a newly acquired Nikkor 210mm lens that will allow me to make borderless 30x40 prints right from the baseboard if I want or need to do that too.  I am going to build a custom cabinet to get the enlarger off the floor.  It looks like I will build a 24" high cabinet based on the maximum extension of the enlarger head as it relates to my ceiling height.  I will be posting new videos on my YouTube Channel as I get all of this built and implemented in case you want to follow along.   

The new 210mm lens will also allow me to make 40x50 prints with a much lower extension too.  

After I make several 30x40 prints, I will be building the new base cabinet at the reduced height to accommodate the 40x50 prints.  I want to run everything through the paces with the 30x40 prints first, and then have a solid plan for the bigger prints.  

Because I am making gallery prints on fiber paper, there are a number of challenges that must be managed when printing this large.  Probably the most problematic is getting the prints flattened after they have been processed and selenium toned.  I will be writing other articles about my process on how I manage all of this, so you may want to subscribe to my free darkroom newsletter so you don't miss that update.  

There is much more to come on all of this, so stay tuned and enjoy the story as it unfolds.  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white black and white photography darkroom film fine art large format large format photography photography silver gelatin http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/making-40x50-silver-gelatin-prints-with-my-8x10-enlarger Mon, 02 Jul 2018 17:08:06 GMT
The July 2018 Edition of the Darkroom Underground Magazine is Available Now! http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/the-july-2018-edition-of-the-darkroom-underground-magazine-is-available-now It has been an amazing first year and we are excited to start our second year of publication.  We have 121 pages of spectacular analog photographs to share with you in this edition along with several articles that are technical, inspirational, and sure to get your creative engine running.

[Purchase Now - Get Immediate Access

Subscribe to Receive The Latest Edition and all Future Editions as They Are Published on Jan 1, April 1, July 1, October 1).  Note: If you are a current subscriber and want to purchase this specific edition of the magazine, contact me for a special coupon code and you will receive a 25% discount off this and all past editions.

Articles and portfolios from Tim Layton, Alex Burke, Bruce Barnbaum, Jon Paul,  Dmitry Donskoy, Philip S. Ulanowsky, Roger Lowe, Chris Walker, and Jason Lane. 

Enjoy 121 pages of this special edition that is jammed pack full of art, inspiration, and information that will make you proud to be an analog photographer.

Tim Layton - Article: The Art & Science of Choosing a Black & White Film Developer. 

Alex Burke - Article & Portfolio: Color Film Slides & Negatives: Why & How To Use Them.

Bruce Barnbaum - Article & Portfolio: Did it Look Like That? - Part 2

Jon Paul - Article & Portfolio: Don't You Get Tired Of Shooting There?

Dmitry Donskoy - Interview & Portfolio: Ambrotype Is a Universe

Philip S. Ulanowsky - Article: Success With HP5+, D23, & SLIMT: Taming An Extended Luminance Range.

Roger Lowe - Article: Why I Shoot Film In A Digital Age.

Jason Lane - The Dry Plate Photography Process

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white darkroom Darkroom Underground Magazine film fine art large format photography http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/7/the-july-2018-edition-of-the-darkroom-underground-magazine-is-available-now Mon, 02 Jul 2018 07:08:29 GMT
30 Days With My 11x14 Large Format Camera and X-Ray Film (Episode 1) http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/30-days-with-my-11x14-large-format-camera-and-x-ray-film-episode-1 Subscribe to my free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss another article or update.

Read exclusive articles, both technical and creative, and view fine art portfolios in the Darkroom Underground Magazine.

Explore my Training Materials that include video workshops, eBooks, and quick reference cards.

Learn more about my Fine Art Platinum and Platinum/Palladium Printmaking.
In July, 2018, I am going to spend thirty days with my 11x14 large format camera using only Kodak Ektascan B/RA X-Ray film. 

If you have been thinking about using or wanting to know more about using X-Ray film, then you will want to do two things.  

First, subscribe to my Free Darkroom Newsletter because I will be sharing exclusive details about my experience with you here that you won't find anywhere else.  Also, on my YouTube Channel, I will be sharing videos from the field and in the darkroom.

My intentions are to make silver gelatin contact prints in the darkroom from the Kodak Ektascan B/RA X-Ray negatives.  I will be exploring various metering techniques and a variety of developers that ultimately help me tame the inherent contrast associated with X-Ray films.  The cost savings of X-Ray film is a huge benefit for large format photographers, so I thought for that reason alone, it was worth investing my time.  Also, I personally like the orthochromatic look for some of my work because I find it gives that vintage feel that I just can't get with modern day panchromatic emulsions.  

I am really excited to focus on this for the entire month of July and see where all this takes me creatively, as well as some new technical discoveries that may come from this period of focus.  

I have a passion for contact printing and I find 11x14 prints to feel and appear substantially larger than 8x10.  I also have a custom dark slide for one of my film holders that allow me to create two 5x14 panoramic exposures on one sheet of film. I have found that 5x14 Platinum prints are something very special when they are mounted, so if things go well, I may explore this too.  

I understood mathmatically that 8x10 was 80 square inches (516 square centimeters) and 11x14 was nearly twice as big at 154 square inches (992 square centimeters), but I didn't count on the emotional impact that I have able to achieve with this format.  If you are an 8x10 photographer that loves to make contact prints, then 11x14 may be something you want to consider at some point.  Maybe my third day journey will help you decide if you want to explore this more.  

MY 11X14 LARGE FORMAT VIEW CAMERA EQUIPMENT

I use the Chamonix 11x14 view camera exclusively for this format.  It is an engineering marvel in my mind and for 11x14, it only weighs 14 lbs/6630g.  My old Burke & James weighs over twice this amount.  The camera is a joy to use in the field and fits nicely into a case for transport. I transport it out in the field in a baby jogging stroller!

I use the following lenses:

  • 210mm Schneider Super-Angulon F8
  • 300mm Rodenstock APO-Sironar W F5.6-F64
  • 450mm Fujinon-C F12.5-F128
  • 600mm Fujinon-C F11.5-F64

I use a Gitzo 5541-LS carbon fiber tripod with a Really Right Stuff BH-55 ball head and I can also use my Manfrotto 400 geared head if I am working on still life.    

For metering, I use a Sekonic 758-DR and I have an older Sekonic 508 that I keep as my backup.  I have been using the 758 since 2010 and really rely on it with a high degree of accuracy.

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) 11x14 11x14 large format analog photography black and white photography darkroom large format platinum silver gelatin http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/30-days-with-my-11x14-large-format-camera-and-x-ray-film-episode-1 Tue, 26 Jun 2018 12:30:50 GMT
Exploring The Colorado Rocky Mountains - Episode 2 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/exploring-the-colorado-rocky-mountains---episode-2 In this video today, I share some of the magnificent scenery of my travels and exploration of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado.  I have traveled all over the world and I think the Rocky Mountains in Colorado are about as close to heaven on earth as one could get.  The cool mountain air and the scenery is refreshing to the soul and something that everyone should experience.  Enjoy this video today and more are coming soon.  You can subscribe to my YouTube Channel today and get notified when I upload new videos. 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) backpacking colorado exploring hiking nature rocky mountains http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/exploring-the-colorado-rocky-mountains---episode-2 Mon, 18 Jun 2018 09:30:00 GMT
Making the Silver Gelatin Darkroom Print From Alley Spring & Mill (Episodes 2 and 3 of 3) http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/making-the-silver-gelatin-darkroom-print-from-alley-spring-mill-episodes-2-and-3-of-3 In the first video, we took you to Alley Spring & Mill in the Ozark Mountains while we photographed the area with my Pentax 67II loaded with T-Max 400 rated at EI-250 and developed the film in XTOL 1:1 in the Jobo for 9 minutes at 20C.

In the second and third videos below, I make a silver gelatin black and white darkroom print from one of Tim Jr's negatives and in the third video, I selenium tone the print. 

Video 2 (Making The Print)

Video 3 (Selenium Toning) 

ALLEY SPRING & MILL
Alley Spring is the 7th largest spring in Missouri with a discharge of 81 million gallons per day.  These cool waters are a treat on a hot summer day and the color is mesmerizing.  While the star of the show is the spring and the old mill, you will enjoy the old-growth shortleaf pines and white oaks that once covered large parts of the lower Ozarks.

The spring conduit is known to extend at least 3000 feet underground and reaches at least 155 feet below the surface. Rainfall and runoff entering sinkholes around the town of Summersville, 15 miles to the northwest, has been determined to enter the labyrinth of cave passageways formed in dissolved dolomite ( a type of limestone) under the Missouri Ozarks and exit at Alley Spring.

Just outside of the natural area is Alley Spring gristmill that was built in 1894. Despite the historic use of the spring to power a mill, Alley Spring has retained its biological integrity. The cool waters issuing forth from Alley Spring flow through a spring branch for a half-mile before entering the Jacks Fork River. Here in the spring branch cool water (58 degrees Fahrenheit) provides habitat for colorful Ozark fishes including the southern redbelly dace, the Ozark sculpin, and the bleeding shiner.

On the dry rocky ridges of this natural area are some of the highest quality old-growth stands of white oak and shortleaf pine woodland known in the Ozarks. These stands were spared the heavy, indiscriminate timber cutting of the Ozarks that occurred from 1880-1920. Looking up at the sentinel pines found on the ridges one can get a glimpse of what the six million acres of shortleaf pine woodlands that were in Missouri in 1860 looked like. Today only about 600,000 acres of shortleaf pine remain in the state. At one time the nation’s largest sawmill was at Grandin, Missouri, where lumber production peaked at the beginning of the 20th century. In 1910 the mill was moved to West Eminence, just 4 miles from here, but by 1920 the woods were cutover and the mill was sold.

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) alley spring black and white film kodak medium format ozark mountains ozarks pentax 67ii river t-max 400 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/making-the-silver-gelatin-darkroom-print-from-alley-spring-mill-episodes-2-and-3-of-3 Thu, 14 Jun 2018 13:00:00 GMT
Alley Spring & Mill in the Ozark Mountains With Pentax 67II & T-Max 400 (Episode 1 of 3) http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/alley-spring-mill-in-the-ozark-mountains-with-pentax-67ii We arrived at Alley Spring and Mill before daybreak in the Ozark Mountains to try and capture the mist and fog over the spring water.  This is basically a scouting trip, so we used the Pentax 67II with T-Max 400 rated at EI-250 and developed the film in XTOL 1:1 in the Jobo for 9 minutes at 20C.

ALLEY SPRING & MILL
Alley Spring is the 7th largest spring in Missouri with a discharge of 81 million gallons per day.  These cool waters are a treat on a hot summer day and the color is mesmerizing.  While the star of the show is the spring and the old mill, you will enjoy the old-growth shortleaf pines and white oaks that once covered large parts of the lower Ozarks.

The spring conduit is known to extend at least 3000 feet underground and reaches at least 155 feet below the surface. Rainfall and runoff entering sinkholes around the town of Summersville, 15 miles to the northwest, has been determined to enter the labyrinth of cave passageways formed in dissolved dolomite ( a type of limestone) under the Missouri Ozarks and exit at Alley Spring.

Just outside of the natural area is Alley Spring gristmill that was built in 1894. Despite the historic use of the spring to power a mill, Alley Spring has retained its biological integrity. The cool waters issuing forth from Alley Spring flow through a spring branch for a half-mile before entering the Jacks Fork River. Here in the spring branch cool water (58 degrees Fahrenheit) provides habitat for colorful Ozark fishes including the southern redbelly dace, the Ozark sculpin, and the bleeding shiner.

On the dry rocky ridges of this natural area are some of the highest quality old-growth stands of white oak and shortleaf pine woodland known in the Ozarks. These stands were spared the heavy, indiscriminate timber cutting of the Ozarks that occurred from 1880-1920. Looking up at the sentinel pines found on the ridges one can get a glimpse of what the six million acres of shortleaf pine woodlands that were in Missouri in 1860 looked like. Today only about 600,000 acres of shortleaf pine remain in the state. At one time the nation’s largest sawmill was at Grandin, Missouri, where lumber production peaked at the beginning of the 20th century. In 1910 the mill was moved to West Eminence, just 4 miles from here, but by 1920 the woods were cutover and the mill was sold.

VIDEO (Episode 1 of 3)

In this first of three videos, we take you to the mill and spring while we photographed the area.  In the second and third videos, we make a print in the darkroom and selenium tone it.  

Take a much needed break from your busy day to relax and enjoy the video for the next couple of minutes.  Tim Jr. did all of the video work on this movie and produced the entire segment on his own.  I will be making some prints from this outing in the near future and they will be available in my silver gelatin fine art print gallery

I plan to return in the fall when the colors will be spectacular and bring my 4x5 and 8x10 large format cameras.  I frequently scout with my Pentax 67II or my Pentax 645N for maximum portability.

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) alley spring black and white film kodak medium format ozark mountains ozarks pentax 67ii river t-max 400 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/alley-spring-mill-in-the-ozark-mountains-with-pentax-67ii Tue, 12 Jun 2018 23:30:00 GMT
Exploring The Colorado Rocky Mountains - Episode 1 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/exploring-the-colorado-rocky-mountains---episode-1 In this video today, I share some of the magnificent scenery of my travels and exploration of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado.  I have traveled all over the world and I think the Rocky Mountains in Colorado are about as close to heaven on earth as one could get.  The cool mountain air and the scenery is refreshing to the soul and something that everyone should experience.  Enjoy this video today and more are coming soon.  You can subscribe to my YouTube Channel today and get notified when I upload new videos. 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) backpacking colorado exploring hiking nature rocky mountains http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/exploring-the-colorado-rocky-mountains---episode-1 Tue, 12 Jun 2018 09:20:41 GMT
Quick Video Tip on How to Align Your Enlarger With a Laser Alignment Tool http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/quick-video-tip-on-how-to-align-your-enlarger-with-a-laser-alignment-tool An often overlooked task by darkroom printers is making sure all of the planes on your enlarger are properly aligned.  In this quick video, I share my simple process by using the laser alignment tool "Parallel by Versalab".  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) alignment darkroom darkroom technique http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/quick-video-tip-on-how-to-align-your-enlarger-with-a-laser-alignment-tool Tue, 12 Jun 2018 08:33:34 GMT
Big Spring in the Ozark Mountains With Pentax 67II and T-Max 400 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/tim-jr-scouting-big-spring-in-the-ozark-mountains-with-pentax-67ii-and-t-max-400 In this brief video, Tim Jr. went out scouting at Big Spring in the Ozark Mountains at daybreak.  Having him be a part of the business is a tremendous help for me personally and we are able to do things now that simply weren't possible when it was just me alone. He scouted this location, recorded the video footage and produced the movie all on his own.  

He used his Pentax 67II with T-Max 400 rated at EI-250 on the scouting trip and he developed the film in XTOL 1:1 in the Jobo for 9 minutes at 20C.   

BIG SPRING

Big Spring is a fascinating and beautiful place.  Big Spring is thought to be the largest natural spring in the USA with over 286 million gallons of water flowing per day.  

An enormous first magnitude spring, it rises at the base of a bluff on the west side of the Current River valley in the Missouri Ozarks. Located about four miles downstream from Van Buren, it is within the boundaries of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways, and its visitor facilities are managed by the National Park Service. It is a contributing resource to Big Spring Historic District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1981.

The spring issues from the base of a limestone bluff, churning out aqua-blue water with great force, creating white caps, then quickly calming to a crystal clear channel. The spring water travels about 1,000 feet (300 m) where it adds itself to the Current River. The water is about 58 degrees Fahrenheit (13.3 °C), and the spring is surrounded by a well maintained park and a steep valley hillside covered in hardwood forest. Most of the known drainage basin encompasses northern areas of the Eleven Point River watershed. Big Spring is ever increasing in size, as the groundwater continues to dissolve limestone in a vast karst system, and continuation of stream capture in greater quantities. The spring is estimated to dissolve and remove 175 tons of limestone during an average day. The amounts of limestone dissolved and removed by the spring system in one year is estimated to equal a one-mile (1.6 km) long cave 30 feet (9.1 m) high 50 feet (15 m) wide, though that amount is dispersed among all parts of the karst system.

VIDEO

Relax and enjoy the video for the next couple of minutes.  We will be making some prints from this outing in the near future and they will be available in my silver gelatin fine art print gallery

I plan to return in the fall when the colors will be spectacular and bring my 4x5 and 8x10 large format cameras.  Tim Jr. found a perspective that I am excited to photograph in the fall.  We frequently scout with the Pentax 67II or Pentax 645N medium format cameras for maximum portability.

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) big spring black and white film kodak macro medium format ozark mountains ozarks pentax 67ii river t-max 400 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/tim-jr-scouting-big-spring-in-the-ozark-mountains-with-pentax-67ii-and-t-max-400 Sat, 09 Jun 2018 13:00:00 GMT
Greer Spring in the Ozark Mountains With Pentax 67II http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/scouting-greer-spring-in-the-ozark-mountains In this brief video, Tim Jr. hiked to Greer Spring before daybreak in the Ozark Mountains.  He used his Pentax 67II with Tri-X rated at EI-250 on the scouting trip and he developed the film in XTOL 1:1 in the Jobo for 7.5 minutes at 20C.

Tim Jr Part of The Team Now

In case you missed my recent newsletter update, Tim Jr. is part of the team now.  He is working on a daily basis to help me achieve even more moving forward.  He scouted this location, captured the video footage, and produced the movie all on his own. I am mentoring him in the darkroom over the next couple of years to become a solid darkroom printer.  He has a lot of aptitude for it and I couldn't be any more proud.  

He also happens to be an incredibly talented artist that can draw and paint.  In fact, last year, some of his original artwork was sold to Warner Bros. and used in a featured production.  He is also an aspiring woodworker.  He and I both make a variety of rustic home decor ranging from solid oak coasters, coat/hat/key racks, phone and tablet stands, tables/desks, candle holders, and more.  We also both paint and I will be sharing some of our nature abstract acrylic paintings in the near future.  

All of this has been a conscious plan that started three years ago when we bought our land in the Ozark's, moved off grid, and built our cabins and darkroom from the ground up.  We started with absolutely nothing other than some generators to run the power tools, about 5 feet of weeds, and a pile of lumber.  That project took us over 18 months, but we are in full production now with our analog photography, woodworking, and painting.  When I say we are off the grid, I truly mean we are off the grid.  The power that I am using to write this article right now was created from the sun. 

GREER SPRING

The 1 mile hike down to the spring is a relaxing and enjoyable hike.  You will be surrounded by the forest and frequently find all types of wildflowers along the well established trail in the spring and summer ranging from Wild Blue Phlox to Bird's Foot Violet's and Wild Petunia's and even Wild Geranium.  In the video below, you will see some Wild Columbine that frequently grow right around the spring area.  Leave your mobile phone behind because it won't get a signal anyway.  Take the time to really relax and enjoy the soothing and restorative powers of nature.    

Greer Spring is a first magnitude spring located in the southeast portion of the Ozark Plateau, in Oregon County in south-central Missouri within the boundaries of the Mark Twain National Forest. The spring is the second largest spring in the Ozarks, with an average discharge of 360 cubic feet (10 m3) of water per second.  Greer Spring was designated a National Natural Landmark in 1980. 

The spring emerges at the bottom of a narrow chasm. An upper outlet flowing from a cavern is only a fraction of Greer Spring's large flow. About 100 feet (30 m) downstream (north) the main outlet boils to the surface in a mixture of deep, aqua-blue water, moss covered rocks, and frothy whitewater.

The newly formed surface stream then races down a small, steep, hardwood blanketed gorge dropping 65 feet (20 m) in elevation for 1.2 miles (1.9 km) to its confluence with the Eleven Point River. Greer Spring greatly increases the flow of the river, ensuring ample water for recreational activities, such as boating, even in the dry months.

The vast amount of spring water changes the Eleven Point River into a coldwater stream for several miles downstream. The spring's cold water also creates ideal conditions for trout. The mouth of the spring branch is roughly 0.5 miles upstream (west) of the Missouri Route 19 bridge over the Eleven Point River. Greer Spring may be the most secluded and undisturbed big spring in the Ozarks.

The spring has been owned by the U.S. National Forest Service since 1993.  Before 1993 the spring was in the caring hands of private ownership. The area surrounding the spring has been retaken by nature, but had a small fish hatchery and roads many years ago, the site has remained very scenic and unspoiled.

VIDEO

Sit back and relax and enjoy the video for the next couple of minutes.  I will be making some prints from this outing in the near future and they will be available in my silver gelatin fine art print gallery

I plan to return in the fall when the colors will be spectacular and bring my 4x5 and 8x10 large format cameras.  I frequently scout with my Pentax 67II or my Pentax 645N for maximum portability.  I was also thinking about returning with my Fuji 617 Panoramic camera for some unique images too.  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) black and white film greer spring kodak macro medium format ozark mountains ozarks pentax 67ii river tri-x http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/scouting-greer-spring-in-the-ozark-mountains Wed, 06 Jun 2018 13:00:00 GMT
Do You Need to Do Less To Achieve More in Your Photography? http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/do-you-need-to-do-less-to-achieve-more-in-your-photography The older that I get, the smarter my dad becomes...  

I am a very passionate about nature, and in particular, flowers, trees, and water scenes.  I have been enjoying the wonders and healing power of nature my entire life.  

Along with this passion and joy, I have discovered that I want to experience and photograph every flower, tree, river, creek, and waterfall that I see.  It turns out that it just isn't possible, and even more importantly, not optimal.  My dad advised me to focus on just a few things and master them deeply.  I unfortunately lost my dad when I was only 21 years old, so I didn't get the opportunity to learn from him as long as I wanted.  His words, even three decades later have significant meaning to me, and I now better understand what he was trying to tell me.  

I have been reflecting about my photography lately and I have come to realize that I need to produce less in order to create more.  What I mean by that is that I need to actually photograph fewer subjects and invest more time in just a very few select prints that are of the highest quality.  I find it very difficult to accept this realization because my passion runs so deep for these subjects.  

I suspect my limitation is one that potentially affects many other photographers, and even non-photographers.  I know that I need to focus on fewer things more deeply in order to achieve higher quality results.  I have evolved to a place where I would rather be a mile deep on a couple subjects as opposed to being an inch deep and a mile wide on many different subjects.

This realization has brought me new inner peace because I no longer feel that I need to photograph everything that I love.  I give myself permission to simply enjoy nature, experience and share it with people that I care about or alone, and be happy with that.  Now that Tim Jr. is part of the team, you will get to experience a greater diversity of topics and subjects because he will be sharing his passion for architecture, old barns and mills, wildlife, and more.  Only a very select few select subjects gain my attention to photograph now and I have a new sense of quality that I have never experienced before.  

How about you?  Have you had similar thoughts about your photography?  If so, share your thoughts and comments below. 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) essay fine art photography psychology self awareness http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/do-you-need-to-do-less-to-achieve-more-in-your-photography Tue, 05 Jun 2018 11:54:09 GMT
Scouting For Wildflowers On My Land in The Ozark Mountains http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/scouting-for-wildflowers-on-my-land-in-the-ozark-mountains In this brief video, I share some of the wildflowers that I discovered and photographed on my land in the Ozark Mountains.  I used my Pentax 67II with Tri-X rated at EI-250 on this day and developed in XTOL 1:1 in my Jobo for 7.5 minutes at 20C.  

Relax and enjoy the video for the next couple of minutes.  I will be making some prints from this outing in the near future and they will be available in my silver gelatin fine art print gallery

 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) black and white film kodak macro medium format pentax 67ii tri-x http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/scouting-for-wildflowers-on-my-land-in-the-ozark-mountains Mon, 04 Jun 2018 18:28:32 GMT
The Ultimate Tip For Sharpening Very Large Prints (hint: it doesn't involve Photoshop) http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/the-ultimate-tip-for-sharpening-very-large-prints Would you like the ultimate tip for sharpening very large prints?  

You will likely either find my answer annoying or possibly insightful.  I will let you be the judge of that.  If you are up for it, continue to read the rest of this article.  

There is so much talk about a variety of Photoshop techniques and sharpening is one that routinely surfaces.  It would appear that the world "assumes" everyone is creating prints with digital cameras and editing them in Photoshop before printing them on some type of computer-driven printing system.  

I have a news flash....Not everyone needs Photoshop, nor do all photographers need to spend tens of thousands of dollars on computers, scanners, software, massive storage devices, digital camera bodies, and all of the other technology that modern photography has swindled the vast majority of photographers into buying and continuing to buy, year after year.

Before you get made and send me some hate mail, I totally understand and acknowledge the relevancy of modern DSLR cameras for certain subjects and scenarios.  However, I think it is foolish to assume that all photography should default to digital capture and electronic printing.  

I don't need to know anything about the latest sharpening technique in Photoshop to create the ultimate fine art print on the planet.  I have a solution that produces the absolute sharpest and clearest ultra large fine art prints in the world.  It is simple, doesn't require constant upgrades, and it is the gold standard in quality and archival permanence.  My solution only requires three very simple things...a large format view camera, sheet film, and an enlarger.  If you don't believe me, then I would suggest you find a way to view one of Clyde Butcher's ultra large silver gelatin prints.  Clyde is internationally known and his mural-size prints.  His artwork is readily accessible in a number of high-end galleries, to include his own in Florida.

If I haven't made you mad, then I hope I have at least raised some awareness about the notion that every photographer needs an expensive digital camera, high-end computer system with massive storage capabilities, and an expensive inkjet printer that drinks ink and empties your bank account faster than you can make a new deposit. You can still make beautiful and superior prints with very simple film cameras and a basic darkroom.  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) film fine art format large photoshop sharpening http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/the-ultimate-tip-for-sharpening-very-large-prints Sun, 03 Jun 2018 00:44:47 GMT
Field Video - Hand Staining Photo Rag Paper For Floral Still Life Backgrounds - Video 3 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/field-video-hand-staining-photo-rag-paper-for-floral-still-life-backgrounds-video-3 In this third video in this series, I headed out to my land in the Ozark Mountains and used the hand-stained backgrounds while exposing some Tri-X 320 at EI-250 developed in XTOL 1:1 for 7.5 minutes on my Jobo. 

I will be posting a fourth and final video when I make some silver gelatin prints in the darkroom that I will share with you.  I will be sending updates on this to my newsletter subscribers.  

 

I started this series by experimenting with a new way to make some backgrounds for my floral still life and wildflower photos while in the field. An old trick that us flower photographers use from time to time is to place a background behind our flowers so that we can stop down the lens and get greater definition or to eliminate undesirable elements and clutter from our compositions.  I go over this extensively in my Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop, in case you are interested. 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white darkroom film fine art floral still life flower photography large format photography http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/field-video-hand-staining-photo-rag-paper-for-floral-still-life-backgrounds-video-3 Sat, 02 Jun 2018 19:44:55 GMT
Experiment - Hand Staining Photo Rag Paper For Floral Still Life Backgrounds - Video 2 http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/5/experiment---hand-staining-photo-rag-paper-for-floral-still-life-backgrounds---video-2 In this second video, I continued to experiment with various techniques and added coffee to the mix.  I share my updates over the course of a couple days with you in this new video.  

I will be posting a third video when I take the new backgrounds out in the field and then making some new prints in the darkroom to see how they look.  I will be sending updates on this to my newsletter subscribers.  

 

In this first video, I started by experimenting with a new way to make some backgrounds for my floral still life and wildflower photos while in the field. An old trick that us flower photographers use from time to time is to place a background behind our flowers so that we can stop down the lens and get greater definition or to eliminate undesirable elements and clutter from our compositions.  I go over this extensively in my Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop, in case you are interested. 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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tim@timlaytonfineart.com (Tim Layton Fine Art) analog photography black and white darkroom film fine art floral still life flower photography large format photography http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/5/experiment---hand-staining-photo-rag-paper-for-floral-still-life-backgrounds---video-2 Sat, 19 May 2018 18:50:07 GMT