http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog Tim Layton Fine Art: Blog
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/img/s/v-5/u131224912-o510457233-50.jpg 2018-06-12T09:27:00Z (C) Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/exploring-the-colorado-rocky-mountains---episode-2 Exploring The Colorado Rocky Mountains - Episode 2

In this video today, I share some of the magnificent scenery of my travels and exploration of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado.  I have traveled all over the world and I think the Rocky Mountains in Colorado are about as close to heaven on earth as one could get.  The cool mountain air and the scenery is refreshing to the soul and something that everyone should experience.  Enjoy this video today and more are coming soon.  You can subscribe to my YouTube Channel today and get notified when I upload new videos. 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-06-18T09:30:00Z 2018-06-18T09:30:00Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/making-the-silver-gelatin-darkroom-print-from-alley-spring-mill-episodes-2-and-3-of-3 Making the Silver Gelatin Darkroom Print From Alley Spring & Mill (Episodes 2 and 3 of 3)

In the first video, we took you to Alley Spring & Mill in the Ozark Mountains while we photographed the area with my Pentax 67II loaded with T-Max 400 rated at EI-250 and developed the film in XTOL 1:1 in the Jobo for 9 minutes at 20C.

In the second and third videos below, I make a silver gelatin black and white darkroom print from one of Tim Jr's negatives and in the third video, I selenium tone the print. 

Video 2 (Making The Print)

Video 3 (Selenium Toning) 

ALLEY SPRING & MILL
Alley Spring is the 7th largest spring in Missouri with a discharge of 81 million gallons per day.  These cool waters are a treat on a hot summer day and the color is mesmerizing.  While the star of the show is the spring and the old mill, you will enjoy the old-growth shortleaf pines and white oaks that once covered large parts of the lower Ozarks.

The spring conduit is known to extend at least 3000 feet underground and reaches at least 155 feet below the surface. Rainfall and runoff entering sinkholes around the town of Summersville, 15 miles to the northwest, has been determined to enter the labyrinth of cave passageways formed in dissolved dolomite ( a type of limestone) under the Missouri Ozarks and exit at Alley Spring.

Just outside of the natural area is Alley Spring gristmill that was built in 1894. Despite the historic use of the spring to power a mill, Alley Spring has retained its biological integrity. The cool waters issuing forth from Alley Spring flow through a spring branch for a half-mile before entering the Jacks Fork River. Here in the spring branch cool water (58 degrees Fahrenheit) provides habitat for colorful Ozark fishes including the southern redbelly dace, the Ozark sculpin, and the bleeding shiner.

On the dry rocky ridges of this natural area are some of the highest quality old-growth stands of white oak and shortleaf pine woodland known in the Ozarks. These stands were spared the heavy, indiscriminate timber cutting of the Ozarks that occurred from 1880-1920. Looking up at the sentinel pines found on the ridges one can get a glimpse of what the six million acres of shortleaf pine woodlands that were in Missouri in 1860 looked like. Today only about 600,000 acres of shortleaf pine remain in the state. At one time the nation’s largest sawmill was at Grandin, Missouri, where lumber production peaked at the beginning of the 20th century. In 1910 the mill was moved to West Eminence, just 4 miles from here, but by 1920 the woods were cutover and the mill was sold.

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-06-14T13:00:00Z 2018-06-14T13:00:00Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/alley-spring-mill-in-the-ozark-mountains-with-pentax-67ii Alley Spring & Mill in the Ozark Mountains With Pentax 67II & T-Max 400 (Episode 1 of 3)

We arrived at Alley Spring and Mill before daybreak in the Ozark Mountains to try and capture the mist and fog over the spring water.  This is basically a scouting trip, so we used the Pentax 67II with T-Max 400 rated at EI-250 and developed the film in XTOL 1:1 in the Jobo for 9 minutes at 20C.

ALLEY SPRING & MILL
Alley Spring is the 7th largest spring in Missouri with a discharge of 81 million gallons per day.  These cool waters are a treat on a hot summer day and the color is mesmerizing.  While the star of the show is the spring and the old mill, you will enjoy the old-growth shortleaf pines and white oaks that once covered large parts of the lower Ozarks.

The spring conduit is known to extend at least 3000 feet underground and reaches at least 155 feet below the surface. Rainfall and runoff entering sinkholes around the town of Summersville, 15 miles to the northwest, has been determined to enter the labyrinth of cave passageways formed in dissolved dolomite ( a type of limestone) under the Missouri Ozarks and exit at Alley Spring.

Just outside of the natural area is Alley Spring gristmill that was built in 1894. Despite the historic use of the spring to power a mill, Alley Spring has retained its biological integrity. The cool waters issuing forth from Alley Spring flow through a spring branch for a half-mile before entering the Jacks Fork River. Here in the spring branch cool water (58 degrees Fahrenheit) provides habitat for colorful Ozark fishes including the southern redbelly dace, the Ozark sculpin, and the bleeding shiner.

On the dry rocky ridges of this natural area are some of the highest quality old-growth stands of white oak and shortleaf pine woodland known in the Ozarks. These stands were spared the heavy, indiscriminate timber cutting of the Ozarks that occurred from 1880-1920. Looking up at the sentinel pines found on the ridges one can get a glimpse of what the six million acres of shortleaf pine woodlands that were in Missouri in 1860 looked like. Today only about 600,000 acres of shortleaf pine remain in the state. At one time the nation’s largest sawmill was at Grandin, Missouri, where lumber production peaked at the beginning of the 20th century. In 1910 the mill was moved to West Eminence, just 4 miles from here, but by 1920 the woods were cutover and the mill was sold.

VIDEO (Episode 1 of 3)

In this first of three videos, we take you to the mill and spring while we photographed the area.  In the second and third videos, we make a print in the darkroom and selenium tone it.  

Take a much needed break from your busy day to relax and enjoy the video for the next couple of minutes.  Tim Jr. did all of the video work on this movie and produced the entire segment on his own.  I will be making some prints from this outing in the near future and they will be available in my silver gelatin fine art print gallery

I plan to return in the fall when the colors will be spectacular and bring my 4x5 and 8x10 large format cameras.  I frequently scout with my Pentax 67II or my Pentax 645N for maximum portability.

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-06-12T23:30:00Z 2018-06-12T23:30:00Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/exploring-the-colorado-rocky-mountains---episode-1 Exploring The Colorado Rocky Mountains - Episode 1

In this video today, I share some of the magnificent scenery of my travels and exploration of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado.  I have traveled all over the world and I think the Rocky Mountains in Colorado are about as close to heaven on earth as one could get.  The cool mountain air and the scenery is refreshing to the soul and something that everyone should experience.  Enjoy this video today and more are coming soon.  You can subscribe to my YouTube Channel today and get notified when I upload new videos. 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-06-12T09:20:41Z 2018-06-12T09:20:41Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/quick-video-tip-on-how-to-align-your-enlarger-with-a-laser-alignment-tool Quick Video Tip on How to Align Your Enlarger With a Laser Alignment Tool

An often overlooked task by darkroom printers is making sure all of the planes on your enlarger are properly aligned.  In this quick video, I share my simple process by using the laser alignment tool "Parallel by Versalab".  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-06-12T08:33:34Z 2018-06-12T08:33:34Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/tim-jr-scouting-big-spring-in-the-ozark-mountains-with-pentax-67ii-and-t-max-400 Big Spring in the Ozark Mountains With Pentax 67II and T-Max 400

In this brief video, Tim Jr. went out scouting at Big Spring in the Ozark Mountains at daybreak.  Having him be a part of the business is a tremendous help for me personally and we are able to do things now that simply weren't possible when it was just me alone. He scouted this location, recorded the video footage and produced the movie all on his own.  

He used his Pentax 67II with T-Max 400 rated at EI-250 on the scouting trip and he developed the film in XTOL 1:1 in the Jobo for 9 minutes at 20C.   

BIG SPRING

Big Spring is a fascinating and beautiful place.  Big Spring is thought to be the largest natural spring in the USA with over 286 million gallons of water flowing per day.  

An enormous first magnitude spring, it rises at the base of a bluff on the west side of the Current River valley in the Missouri Ozarks. Located about four miles downstream from Van Buren, it is within the boundaries of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways, and its visitor facilities are managed by the National Park Service. It is a contributing resource to Big Spring Historic District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1981.

The spring issues from the base of a limestone bluff, churning out aqua-blue water with great force, creating white caps, then quickly calming to a crystal clear channel. The spring water travels about 1,000 feet (300 m) where it adds itself to the Current River. The water is about 58 degrees Fahrenheit (13.3 °C), and the spring is surrounded by a well maintained park and a steep valley hillside covered in hardwood forest. Most of the known drainage basin encompasses northern areas of the Eleven Point River watershed. Big Spring is ever increasing in size, as the groundwater continues to dissolve limestone in a vast karst system, and continuation of stream capture in greater quantities. The spring is estimated to dissolve and remove 175 tons of limestone during an average day. The amounts of limestone dissolved and removed by the spring system in one year is estimated to equal a one-mile (1.6 km) long cave 30 feet (9.1 m) high 50 feet (15 m) wide, though that amount is dispersed among all parts of the karst system.

VIDEO

Relax and enjoy the video for the next couple of minutes.  We will be making some prints from this outing in the near future and they will be available in my silver gelatin fine art print gallery

I plan to return in the fall when the colors will be spectacular and bring my 4x5 and 8x10 large format cameras.  Tim Jr. found a perspective that I am excited to photograph in the fall.  We frequently scout with the Pentax 67II or Pentax 645N medium format cameras for maximum portability.

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-06-09T13:00:00Z 2018-06-09T13:00:00Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/scouting-greer-spring-in-the-ozark-mountains Greer Spring in the Ozark Mountains With Pentax 67II

In this brief video, Tim Jr. hiked to Greer Spring before daybreak in the Ozark Mountains.  He used his Pentax 67II with Tri-X rated at EI-250 on the scouting trip and he developed the film in XTOL 1:1 in the Jobo for 7.5 minutes at 20C.

Tim Jr Part of The Team Now

In case you missed my recent newsletter update, Tim Jr. is part of the team now.  He is working on a daily basis to help me achieve even more moving forward.  He scouted this location, captured the video footage, and produced the movie all on his own. I am mentoring him in the darkroom over the next couple of years to become a solid darkroom printer.  He has a lot of aptitude for it and I couldn't be any more proud.  

He also happens to be an incredibly talented artist that can draw and paint.  In fact, last year, some of his original artwork was sold to Warner Bros. and used in a featured production.  He is also an aspiring woodworker.  He and I both make a variety of rustic home decor ranging from solid oak coasters, coat/hat/key racks, phone and tablet stands, tables/desks, candle holders, and more.  We also both paint and I will be sharing some of our nature abstract acrylic paintings in the near future.  

All of this has been a conscious plan that started three years ago when we bought our land in the Ozark's, moved off grid, and built our cabins and darkroom from the ground up.  We started with absolutely nothing other than some generators to run the power tools, about 5 feet of weeds, and a pile of lumber.  That project took us over 18 months, but we are in full production now with our analog photography, woodworking, and painting.  When I say we are off the grid, I truly mean we are off the grid.  The power that I am using to write this article right now was created from the sun. 

GREER SPRING

The 1 mile hike down to the spring is a relaxing and enjoyable hike.  You will be surrounded by the forest and frequently find all types of wildflowers along the well established trail in the spring and summer ranging from Wild Blue Phlox to Bird's Foot Violet's and Wild Petunia's and even Wild Geranium.  In the video below, you will see some Wild Columbine that frequently grow right around the spring area.  Leave your mobile phone behind because it won't get a signal anyway.  Take the time to really relax and enjoy the soothing and restorative powers of nature.    

Greer Spring is a first magnitude spring located in the southeast portion of the Ozark Plateau, in Oregon County in south-central Missouri within the boundaries of the Mark Twain National Forest. The spring is the second largest spring in the Ozarks, with an average discharge of 360 cubic feet (10 m3) of water per second.  Greer Spring was designated a National Natural Landmark in 1980. 

The spring emerges at the bottom of a narrow chasm. An upper outlet flowing from a cavern is only a fraction of Greer Spring's large flow. About 100 feet (30 m) downstream (north) the main outlet boils to the surface in a mixture of deep, aqua-blue water, moss covered rocks, and frothy whitewater.

The newly formed surface stream then races down a small, steep, hardwood blanketed gorge dropping 65 feet (20 m) in elevation for 1.2 miles (1.9 km) to its confluence with the Eleven Point River. Greer Spring greatly increases the flow of the river, ensuring ample water for recreational activities, such as boating, even in the dry months.

The vast amount of spring water changes the Eleven Point River into a coldwater stream for several miles downstream. The spring's cold water also creates ideal conditions for trout. The mouth of the spring branch is roughly 0.5 miles upstream (west) of the Missouri Route 19 bridge over the Eleven Point River. Greer Spring may be the most secluded and undisturbed big spring in the Ozarks.

The spring has been owned by the U.S. National Forest Service since 1993.  Before 1993 the spring was in the caring hands of private ownership. The area surrounding the spring has been retaken by nature, but had a small fish hatchery and roads many years ago, the site has remained very scenic and unspoiled.

VIDEO

Sit back and relax and enjoy the video for the next couple of minutes.  I will be making some prints from this outing in the near future and they will be available in my silver gelatin fine art print gallery

I plan to return in the fall when the colors will be spectacular and bring my 4x5 and 8x10 large format cameras.  I frequently scout with my Pentax 67II or my Pentax 645N for maximum portability.  I was also thinking about returning with my Fuji 617 Panoramic camera for some unique images too.  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-06-06T13:00:00Z 2018-06-06T13:00:00Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/do-you-need-to-do-less-to-achieve-more-in-your-photography Do You Need to Do Less To Achieve More in Your Photography?

The older that I get, the smarter my dad becomes...  

I am a very passionate about nature, and in particular, flowers, trees, and water scenes.  I have been enjoying the wonders and healing power of nature my entire life.  

Along with this passion and joy, I have discovered that I want to experience and photograph every flower, tree, river, creek, and waterfall that I see.  It turns out that it just isn't possible, and even more importantly, not optimal.  My dad advised me to focus on just a few things and master them deeply.  I unfortunately lost my dad when I was only 21 years old, so I didn't get the opportunity to learn from him as long as I wanted.  His words, even three decades later have significant meaning to me, and I now better understand what he was trying to tell me.  

I have been reflecting about my photography lately and I have come to realize that I need to produce less in order to create more.  What I mean by that is that I need to actually photograph fewer subjects and invest more time in just a very few select prints that are of the highest quality.  I find it very difficult to accept this realization because my passion runs so deep for these subjects.  

I suspect my limitation is one that potentially affects many other photographers, and even non-photographers.  I know that I need to focus on fewer things more deeply in order to achieve higher quality results.  I have evolved to a place where I would rather be a mile deep on a couple subjects as opposed to being an inch deep and a mile wide on many different subjects.

This realization has brought me new inner peace because I no longer feel that I need to photograph everything that I love.  I give myself permission to simply enjoy nature, experience and share it with people that I care about or alone, and be happy with that.  Now that Tim Jr. is part of the team, you will get to experience a greater diversity of topics and subjects because he will be sharing his passion for architecture, old barns and mills, wildlife, and more.  Only a very select few select subjects gain my attention to photograph now and I have a new sense of quality that I have never experienced before.  

How about you?  Have you had similar thoughts about your photography?  If so, share your thoughts and comments below. 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-06-05T11:54:09Z 2018-06-05T11:54:09Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/scouting-for-wildflowers-on-my-land-in-the-ozark-mountains Scouting For Wildflowers On My Land in The Ozark Mountains

In this brief video, I share some of the wildflowers that I discovered and photographed on my land in the Ozark Mountains.  I used my Pentax 67II with Tri-X rated at EI-250 on this day and developed in XTOL 1:1 in my Jobo for 7.5 minutes at 20C.  

Relax and enjoy the video for the next couple of minutes.  I will be making some prints from this outing in the near future and they will be available in my silver gelatin fine art print gallery

 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-06-04T18:28:32Z 2018-06-04T18:28:32Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/the-ultimate-tip-for-sharpening-very-large-prints The Ultimate Tip For Sharpening Very Large Prints (hint: it doesn't involve Photoshop)

Would you like the ultimate tip for sharpening very large prints?  

You will likely either find my answer annoying or possibly insightful.  I will let you be the judge of that.  If you are up for it, continue to read the rest of this article.  

There is so much talk about a variety of Photoshop techniques and sharpening is one that routinely surfaces.  It would appear that the world "assumes" everyone is creating prints with digital cameras and editing them in Photoshop before printing them on some type of computer-driven printing system.  

I have a news flash....Not everyone needs Photoshop, nor do all photographers need to spend tens of thousands of dollars on computers, scanners, software, massive storage devices, digital camera bodies, and all of the other technology that modern photography has swindled the vast majority of photographers into buying and continuing to buy, year after year.

Before you get made and send me some hate mail, I totally understand and acknowledge the relevancy of modern DSLR cameras for certain subjects and scenarios.  However, I think it is foolish to assume that all photography should default to digital capture and electronic printing.  

I don't need to know anything about the latest sharpening technique in Photoshop to create the ultimate fine art print on the planet.  I have a solution that produces the absolute sharpest and clearest ultra large fine art prints in the world.  It is simple, doesn't require constant upgrades, and it is the gold standard in quality and archival permanence.  My solution only requires three very simple things...a large format view camera, sheet film, and an enlarger.  If you don't believe me, then I would suggest you find a way to view one of Clyde Butcher's ultra large silver gelatin prints.  Clyde is internationally known and his mural-size prints.  His artwork is readily accessible in a number of high-end galleries, to include his own in Florida.

If I haven't made you mad, then I hope I have at least raised some awareness about the notion that every photographer needs an expensive digital camera, high-end computer system with massive storage capabilities, and an expensive inkjet printer that drinks ink and empties your bank account faster than you can make a new deposit. You can still make beautiful and superior prints with very simple film cameras and a basic darkroom.  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-06-03T00:44:47Z 2018-06-03T00:44:47Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/6/field-video-hand-staining-photo-rag-paper-for-floral-still-life-backgrounds-video-3 Field Video - Hand Staining Photo Rag Paper For Floral Still Life Backgrounds - Video 3

In this third video in this series, I headed out to my land in the Ozark Mountains and used the hand-stained backgrounds while exposing some Tri-X 320 at EI-250 developed in XTOL 1:1 for 7.5 minutes on my Jobo. 

I will be posting a fourth and final video when I make some silver gelatin prints in the darkroom that I will share with you.  I will be sending updates on this to my newsletter subscribers.  

 

I started this series by experimenting with a new way to make some backgrounds for my floral still life and wildflower photos while in the field. An old trick that us flower photographers use from time to time is to place a background behind our flowers so that we can stop down the lens and get greater definition or to eliminate undesirable elements and clutter from our compositions.  I go over this extensively in my Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop, in case you are interested. 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-06-02T19:44:55Z 2018-06-02T19:44:55Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/5/experiment---hand-staining-photo-rag-paper-for-floral-still-life-backgrounds---video-2 Experiment - Hand Staining Photo Rag Paper For Floral Still Life Backgrounds - Video 2

In this second video, I continued to experiment with various techniques and added coffee to the mix.  I share my updates over the course of a couple days with you in this new video.  

I will be posting a third video when I take the new backgrounds out in the field and then making some new prints in the darkroom to see how they look.  I will be sending updates on this to my newsletter subscribers.  

 

In this first video, I started by experimenting with a new way to make some backgrounds for my floral still life and wildflower photos while in the field. An old trick that us flower photographers use from time to time is to place a background behind our flowers so that we can stop down the lens and get greater definition or to eliminate undesirable elements and clutter from our compositions.  I go over this extensively in my Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop, in case you are interested. 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-05-19T18:50:07Z 2018-05-19T18:50:07Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/5/experiment-hand-staining-photo-rag-paper-for-floral-still-life-backgrounds-video-1 Experiment - Hand Staining Photo Rag Paper For Floral Still Life Backgrounds - Video 1

In this first video, I am experimenting with a new way to make some backgrounds for my floral still life and wildflower photos while in the field. An old trick that us flower photographers use from time to time is to place a background behind our flowers so that we can stop down the lens and get greater definition or to eliminate undesirable elements and clutter from our compositions.  I go over this extensively in my Large Format Floral Still Life Video Workshop, in case you are interested. 

I will be posting at least two more videos in this series as I experiment with different staining techniques and compare how tea works as opposed to coffee.  Then I will be heading to the field to create some new exposures and make some prints in the darkroom which I will share with you.  I will be sending updates on this to my newsletter subscribers.  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

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Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-05-16T19:15:42Z 2018-05-16T19:15:42Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/5/may-2018-darkroom-underground-fine-art-print-rocky-creek-shut-ins May 2018 Darkroom Underground Fine Art Print - Rocky Creek Shut-ins

 

I am now shipping the May 2018 Darkroom Underground Fine Art Print Club silver gelatin large format contact print, Rocky Creek Shut-ins.  

Rocky Creek is located in the Ozark Mountains in southern Missouri in the USA.  The Ozark's are a vast landscape of mountains, streams, natural springs, waterfalls, rivers, lakes, caves, hardwood forests, wildlife, and wildflowers covering 50,000 square miles located primarily in Missouri and Arkansas. Millions of visitors every year come to explore the rugged beauty of the Ozark's to enjoy the stunning vistas, sparkling rivers and waterfalls, fish-filled lakes, hiking and biking trails, world-class trout fishing, camping, canoeing, and a seemingly endless variety of rejuvenating outdoor adventures.

I used Ilford FP4+ 5x7 black and white sheet film developed in Pyrocat HD to create the negative.  I printed on Ilford MGIV Portfolio paper and selenium toned to archival standards for maximum permanence.  

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film, darkroom photography supplies, and all your photo gear and accessories from my website here and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-05-15T10:09:15Z 2018-05-15T10:09:15Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/5/making-a-large-format-contact-print-with-a-paper-negative-using-the-split-grade-method How To Make a Large Format Contact Print with a Paper Negative Using the Split-Grade Method

In this video, I show how to make a split grade silver gelatin contact print in the darkroom using grade 2 RC glossy darkroom paper as a negative medium.  The printing process for making contact prints with paper negatives is exactly the same for film.  I made my contact printing lamp out of a shop light that I sourced from my local hardware store.  I used a 15W incandescent lightbulb (2900k).  

Materials & Supplies Used In This Video 

You may be interested in my comprehensive Large Format Paper Negatives Video Workshop and my Split Grade Printing Step-by-Step eBook

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Shop for your film and darkroom photography supplies and support our analog photography mission. 

Learn how to transform your passion for photography into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-05-09T00:01:36Z 2018-05-09T00:01:36Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/5/you-can-now-purchase-your-film-darkroom-equipment-supplies-from-timlaytonfineart-com You Can Now Purchase Your Film & Darkroom Equipment & Supplies From TimLaytonFineArt.com

B&H Logo 300x206B&H Logo 300x206 I am super excited to announce that Tim Layton Fine Art is now a B&H Affiliate

This is good news for everyone, because when you make your regular purchases for film, darkroom chemicals, enlarging paper, cameras, lenses, or anything photography related, we earn a small commission at no additional cost to you.

You can get started right now by either clicking on the B&H Logo anywhere on the website and blog or visiting the main shopping page for a breakdown of all the various categories.   

Your support is important because it will allow us to go deeper and create more free articles and videos on the topics that you love.  If you have ideas for some future articles and videos, contact me and please share this with me. 

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Learn how to transform your passion into a profitable online business.  

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-05-08T14:24:51Z 2018-05-08T14:24:51Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/5/new-online-business-training-for-artists-photographers New Online Business Training For Artists & Photographers - Learn How To Make Money While You Sleep

Online Entrepreneur Business Training Program For Artists & Photographers

  • Are you a creative person that would love to be able to make a living by following your passion?
  • Do you ever wonder how other creatives are able to be successful in such a competitive environment?
  • Would you like to earn passive income so that you can focus on creating new artwork without financial stress? 
  • Learn how you can make money while you sleep and do other important things in your business.  

I am currently developing a comprehensive Online Entrepreneur Business Training Program for creative professionals to teach you everything you need to know to transform your passion into a profitable online knowledge business.

The old model of trading time for money is a road to a tired back and financial failure. You can only work so much and it's simply impossible to constantly produce day after day, trading your time for money.  The trading time for money approach is also very limited in terms of how much money you can really make.  

You can work smarter and create passive income while you focus on making new artwork without all the financial stress.  The passive income model has no theoretical limits on your earning potential.  Plus, wouldn't it be great to be able to take vacations and continue to make money while you enjoy your vacation and relax.  

It doesn't matter if you are a wedding or portrait photographer, painter, or a nature or commercial photographer, all artists have the same goals and challenges.  We all want to follow our passion, but we need income because that is how the modern world works. Stop trading your time for money and start making a passive income that will allow you to create new artwork without all the unnecessary financial stress.  

Even if you have other successful areas in your business such as in-person workshops, you are limited by your time and availability of others.  While this can still be a good and fun way to earn some extra income, there is a smarter way to earn money while you sleep and do other things.  

There is a better way and I show you how to create an online knowledge business that harnesses the power of online marketing. 

You can get a 50% DISCOUNT on my Online Entrepreneur Business Training Program by using the code “DM50” at checkout. Once I release the training program, I will never offer it again at this discount and this isn’t a sales gimmick to try and get you to purchase now.  This is how I do it with all of my other successful online photography training and you can see from the testimonials, I have satisfied customers from around the world.

By building an online segment to your photography and art business, you are creating a passive income source that allows you to make money while you are focusing on the creative aspects of your business.  This is how I am able to travel extensively and invest considerable periods of time developing my other video workshops and promoting my art without stress.  

With a successful online business, you can live anywhere, work from anywhere, and live your passion while helping others in the process.  Your age, race, education, and location doesn't matter.  Everyone can be successful if you understand how to build an audience, test and validate your offerings, and attract a steady flow of new customers.  I walk you through my entire process of how I built and run my online training business.  

I believe that the Online Entrepreneur Business Training Program is the single most important thing you can do right now to help you in your long-term success.  By having an area in your business that produces income while you do other things is the key to performing without stress.  I am able to create my fine art prints at a relaxed pace and without the need to run discounts or special sales because I have built an income engine for my business through my online training.  

For more information, visit my Online Entrepreneur Business Training Program page.

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-05-07T14:09:03Z 2018-05-07T14:09:03Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/5/early-spring-dogwood-flowers---make-the-split-grade-silver-gelatin-print---part-3-of-3 Early Spring Dogwood Flowers - Make The Split Grade Silver Gelatin Print - Part 3 of 3

In a three-part series, I take you along with me to Norfolk Lake in Mountain Home, Arkansas as I hike and explore while I scout for early spring flowers.  I found some beautiful dogwood trees that were in bloom and I decided to make a black and white split grade silver gelatin print.  

In this third video, I make the split grade silver gelatin black and white print and share it with you.  In the second video, I developed the T-Max 400 using XTOL and I share all the details with you.   In the first video, I shared the area with you as I hike and explore for early spring flowers.  

If you enjoy these types of videos, then connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new movies.

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-05-07T09:11:34Z 2018-05-07T09:11:34Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/5/early-spring-dogwood-flowers---develop-the-film---part-2-of-3 Early Spring Dogwood Flowers - Develop The Film - Part 2 of 3

In a three-part series, I take you along with me to Norfolk Lake in Mountain Home, Arkansas as I hike and explore while I scout for early spring flowers.  I found some beautiful dogwood trees that were in bloom and I decided to make a black and white split grade silver gelatin print.  

In this second video, I develop the T-Max 400 using XTOL and I share all the details with you.  In the third video, I make a split grade silver gelatin black and white print and share it with you.  In the first video, I shared the area with you as I hike and explore for early spring flowers.  

If you enjoy these types of videos, then connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new movies.

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-05-07T09:11:18Z 2018-05-07T09:11:18Z
http://www.timlaytonfineart.com/blog/2018/5/early-spring-dogwood-flowers---making-of-the-silver-gelatin-print---part-1-of-3 Early Spring Dogwood Flowers - Explore Norfolk Lake - Part 1 of 3

In a three-part series, I take you along with me to Norfolk Lake in Mountain Home, Arkansas as I hike and explore while I scout for early spring flowers.  I found some beautiful dogwood trees that were in bloom and I decided to make a black and white split grade silver gelatin print.  

In this first video, I share the area with you as I hike and explore for early spring flowers.  In the second video, I develop the T-Max 400 using XTOL and I share all the details with you.  In the third video, I make a split grade silver gelatin black and white print and share it with you.  

If you enjoy these types of videos, then connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new movies.

Connect with me on my YouTube Channel to get notified when I post new videos.

Join my Free Darkroom Newsletter and never miss an update again. You also get exclusive discounts on my darkroom and large format eBooks and video workshops.  

Tim Layton - Fine Art Analog Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Layton Fine Art tim@timlaytonfineart.com © Tim Layton Fine Art Corporation | All Rights Reserved 2018-05-07T09:10:52Z 2018-05-07T09:10:52Z